Climbing

Adventure Media Review, Climbing, Manic Media Monday / 03.10.2011

It’s always interesting to see how mainstream media depicts the world of rock climbing and mountaineering. Last night the CBS television show The Good Wife revolved around a fictional ill-fated incident on an expedition to the summit of Mount Everest. In an episode called The Death Zone, lawyers debate the circumstances that suggest one climber stole the bottled oxygen of another leaving him to die below the Hillary Step. In a libel suite against a book written by the brother of the dead climber the alleged oxygen thief -one of those wealthy mountaineers who can afford a lawyer -justifies his actions, claiming a legal precedent. That’s what happens on an expedition. “He froze to death and you left him, I left him, everybody left him. Why? Because we would have died carrying him down,” he said. “It is the law of the death zone. We all know we can’t be carried out.”
Book Review, Climbing, Expedition News, Interview, Podcast / 30.09.2011

An interview with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson As an adventure journalist I have the opportunity to meet some amazing people. And it was through the magic of social media that I became friends with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson. We first got acquainted on Facebook. But last year we met in person at a café in the Canadian Rockies, a town called Banff. There he told his incredible story of friendship, adventure and survival that’s the subject of his new book, “The Ledge”. On...

Adventure Media Review, Climbing, Film Review / 28.09.2011

Filmmaker Chuck Fryberger makes climbing movies for climbers. His flicks are an intimate look at state of the art and he suffers no patience for those on the short end of the learning curve. “I’m going to make a film with Chris Sharma and I’m not going to explain who he is, because that just gets in the way of the story.” He said in a recent interview. So don’t expect a voiceover narration on the intricate details of big wall climbing or even bouldering. “I’m not at all worried about confusing non-climbers with my films,” Fryberger said. “If my mom sees this film and understands everything she sees then I’ve failed."
Climbing, Destinations, Interview, Kids in Nature, Podcast, Yosemite / 23.09.2011

[audio mp3="http://joytrip2019.mhwebstaging.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Ron-Kauk.mp3"][/audio] Ron Kauk is one of the best known climbers in Yosemite Valley. He was among that early generation of big wall pioneers that set the standards and established the major routes that are still popular today. Since 1974 he’s been a regular in the Yosemite climbing community. Having made the first free ascent of Washington Column in 1975 with John Long and John Bachar Kauk renamed the route Astroman and it became the most challenging climb in the Valley for more than 10 years. On a joy trip...

Adventure Activism, Africa, Charitable Giving, Climbing, Environmental Justice, Ethiopia, philanthropy, Photography / 12.08.2011

A caravan of five Land Cruisers bounces along a rocky path. Five hundred miles north of Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, the village of Atsemba is only accessible by a dirt road, and the nearest town is over an hour away. The passage is not so much a road as it is simply the clearest line of travel across a dusty landscape scattered with stones and scrub grass.

In this remote region of East Africa, donkeys are more common than cars. And the arrival of so many sport utility vehicles in this austere community of 3,200 draws an excitable crowd Laughing voices rise with the sound of beating drums. Ululations and cheers from the growing throng are jubilant, welcoming. People of the village and the surrounding community come running to meet honored guests-17 tired travelers. Their white skin and pristine sportswear are a stark contrast against the dark complexions and second-hand cotton clothing of the villagers. But everyone shares broad smiles and eyes that shine bright with excitement. The visitors, from North America and Australia, are eager to see their vision of foreign aid brought to life in the shape of a four-room schoolhouse they helped to fund here. The people of Atsemba are just as anxious to show them. Children are quick to take the strangers’ hands as they enter the heart of the village. The new arrivals exchange greetings with village elders, some offering handshakes, others offering hugs. It’s a boisterous and happy parade of strangers, one of which-a tall, athletic blond woman-tries to go unnoticed. She’s hard to miss, and, as she’d visited Atsemba before, a few of the villagers recognize her as the catalyst for the occasion. She smiles warmly, but Shannon Wilson tries not to draw anyone’s attention. It’s clear she doesn’t want today’s celebration to be about her. Even as she cuts a bright pink ribbon to dedicate the new building at the Atsemba Community Primary School she has very few words. “We hope that your children will envision a brighter future for themselves.”