The Joy Trip Project | Reporting on the Business, Art & Culture of the Sustainable Active Lifestyle
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Breaking News, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, National Parks, Outdoor Recreation, Video / 17.02.2011

It’s hardly fair to berate the President of the United States for being late. The speech scheduled for 4:45 EST in the East Room of the White House didn’t get underway until well past the top of the hour. But for what its worth his report on America’s Great Outdoors Initiative arrives just in the nick of time. Through more than 10 months of outreach, research and planning the Obama administration tapped the leading minds in outdoor recreation and wilderness conservation to create a new plan. “And together, we’ve laid the foundation for a smarter, more community-driven environmental strategy,” the President said.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Video / 16.02.2011

The Rio Grande flows through some of the oldest continually inhabited land in the United States. In northern New Mexico, the river follows a deep gorge formed by the separation of the Earth’s crust. Because of its wild and pristine state it’s home to a rich population of birds and mammals and is one of the world’s great migratory fly-aways linking the United States and Canada for hundreds of migrating bird species.

For the past 30 years concerned citizens and lawmakers have been working to create the Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area along New Mexico’s northern boarder. The proposed NCA consists of 235,000 acres of rolling sagebrush hills and 70 miles of the Rio Grande, the first section of wild and scenic river established in the United States. The goal is not only to preserve this rare and wild landscape, but also a way of life that dates back hundreds of years.

Africa, Breaking News, Charitable Giving, Ethiopia, philanthropy / 15.02.2011

There’s nothing quite like having your imagination transformed into reality. Less than five months ago I stood taking pictures of a hole in the ground and pile of stones on a dusty plain in Sub-Saharan Africa. Today I received a photograph via Facebook of the newly dedicated Laelay Wukro Community Primary School. Though I was not surprised, I continue to be amazed.

Capital Region Business Journal, Charitable Giving, Madison, Magazines, philanthropy, Sustainable Living / 15.02.2011

Home improvement projects and discount building supplies make for strong communities at the Habitat For Humanity ReStore. Stocked exclusively with donated new and used household materials this retail establishment on Madison’s Eastside helps low-income wage earners work their way to homeownership while keeping tons of construction waste out of area landfills. The first of its kind in Wisconsin the ReStore at 208 Cottage Grove Road is now one of 19 locations in the state that take in unwanted supplies for home renovation. Staffed by volunteers the business with 750 storefronts nationwide offers those eligible for a home construction grant to invest their time and energy working to provide affordable supplies to Madison do-it-yourselfers on a budget.
Africa, Breaking News, Climbing, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Ethiopia, Manic Media Monday, Photography / 14.02.2011

It’s good to finally be caught up. After months of road trips, foreign travel and writing projects this Monday morning I suddenly find myself at the top the news cycle ready to take another lap. Now that Season Three of the Joy Trip Project is well underway it’s time to start taking a look around the world of adventure see what’s going on. Here are six stories to watch this week: Imagine One Day Opens Registration for Ethiopia Tour 2011:   [caption id="attachment_4575" align="alignright" width="368"] Majka Burhardt setting new routes in Ethiopia[/caption] If...

Assignment Earth, Climate Change, Environmental Journalism, National Parks, Video / 03.02.2011

A love of backcountry skiing explains David Gonzales’ obsession with white bark pines. A writer and photographer, he spends a lot of time beneath these ancient trees. But the white barks are under attack. And that has this skier marshaling forces to fight back. Once the snow melts, he leads volunteers called Tree Fighters into the forest surrounding Yellowstone National Park. Tree Fight is an organization that is working to curb the loss of white bark pines due to the escalating impact of climate change. Scientists say rising temperatures have opened the door to a mountain pine beetle invasion. White barks live at the highest, harshest elevations in the northwestern United States and Southwestern Canada. Extremely cold temperatures used to keep this native pest at lower elevations. Now these beetles are capitalizing on warmer temperatures, killing white barks at a staggering rate. Tree Fight aims to stop them.