The Joy Trip Project | Reporting on the Business, Art & Culture of the Sustainable Active Lifestyle
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Adventure Activism, Africa, Charitable Giving, Ethiopia, Expedition News, philanthropy / 16.08.2011

Watch an idea transform into reality and you’ll never be the same again. When you see a community torn apart by war, famine and death come together and build a brighter future, it’s hard to not believe that anything is possible. After three weeks last fall traveling in Ethiopia I’ve come to understand exactly how individuals can make a difference to change the world. The non-governmental organization Imagine1Day is making it possible for ordinary people to deliver creative contributions to improve the lives of millions living in poverty. Through the process of Creatribution a handful of do-gooders blend their artistic talents and passion for helping others to raise money and awareness for the building of schools throughout one of the poorest countries on the planet.
#ORSummer, Business, Diversity, Environmental Justice, Gear Whore Confessions, Outdoor Retailer, Summer / 15.08.2011

I spent more than a week trying to get Chris Keyes to return my calls. So when the senior editor at Outside Magazine reached out to shake my hand during the breakfast meeting of the Conservation Alliance I was naturally thrilled. It’s at these events during the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market when the distance between professional relationships shrinks and contact can be made face to face. But the depth and strength of any relationship should never be taken for granted. And as I discovered it’s usually best to truly connect with a person before you try to game an exchange of business cards into something more than the meeting of two people.
Adventure Activism, Africa, Charitable Giving, Climbing, Environmental Justice, Ethiopia, philanthropy, Photography / 12.08.2011

A caravan of five Land Cruisers bounces along a rocky path. Five hundred miles north of Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, the village of Atsemba is only accessible by a dirt road, and the nearest town is over an hour away. The passage is not so much a road as it is simply the clearest line of travel across a dusty landscape scattered with stones and scrub grass.

In this remote region of East Africa, donkeys are more common than cars. And the arrival of so many sport utility vehicles in this austere community of 3,200 draws an excitable crowd Laughing voices rise with the sound of beating drums. Ululations and cheers from the growing throng are jubilant, welcoming. People of the village and the surrounding community come running to meet honored guests-17 tired travelers. Their white skin and pristine sportswear are a stark contrast against the dark complexions and second-hand cotton clothing of the villagers. But everyone shares broad smiles and eyes that shine bright with excitement. The visitors, from North America and Australia, are eager to see their vision of foreign aid brought to life in the shape of a four-room schoolhouse they helped to fund here. The people of Atsemba are just as anxious to show them. Children are quick to take the strangers’ hands as they enter the heart of the village. The new arrivals exchange greetings with village elders, some offering handshakes, others offering hugs. It’s a boisterous and happy parade of strangers, one of which-a tall, athletic blond woman-tries to go unnoticed. She’s hard to miss, and, as she’d visited Atsemba before, a few of the villagers recognize her as the catalyst for the occasion. She smiles warmly, but Shannon Wilson tries not to draw anyone’s attention. It’s clear she doesn’t want today’s celebration to be about her. Even as she cuts a bright pink ribbon to dedicate the new building at the Atsemba Community Primary School she has very few words. “We hope that your children will envision a brighter future for themselves.”
Book Review, Diversity, Environmental Justice, Sierra Club / 11.08.2011

From Emancipation Day through the first decade of the 20th century, Gloryland spans the arch of freedom. In his premiere novel veteran National Park Service ranger Shelton Johnson chronicles the path of an African-American man born mere hours after the abolition of slavery at the end of the Civil War. Narrated by lead character Elijah Yancy the story unfolds in the years that follow to track his life’s course to become empowered by the liberty to be found in service to his country and communion with nature. Fleeing the...

#ORSummer, Diversity, Environmental Justice, National Parks, Outdoor Retailer, Podcast, Special Events, Summer, Yosemite / 10.08.2011

For those of us who spend a great deal of time outdoors it’s hard to believe that there are many of those who don’t. Especially when it comes to our national parks there is an entire segment of the United States population, natural born citizens who seldom if ever visit. This is particularly true among people of color. African-Americans, Hispanics and other ethnic minorities spend far less time in nature than their white counterparts. And in a shifting demographic where minorities will soon become the majority there’s rising concern throughout the conservation movement that one day in the not so distant future most U.S. citizens will have no personal relationship with or affinity for the natural world. This concern is expressed most eloquently by National Park Ranger Shelton Johnson. The only permanent African-American ranger at Yosemite National Park his mission is to share with audiences, black and white, lessons of stewardship that illustrate the bond with nature that is every U.S. citizen’s birth rite. An interpretive ranger that tells the story of the Buffalo Soldiers, African-American cavalrymen who projected Yosemite at the turn of last century, Johnson puts into context the importance of wilderness not merely as a point of national pride but an intrinsic value of what it mean to be human.
#ORSummer, Fashion / 09.08.2011

Spurred by first-time prize package including a design contract and cash prizes, San Francisco State University student designer Amy Dorie won Project OR Cycle 7 at Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2011 with a woman's outfit, inspired by the outdoors and the Aventura brand.

 

Designed and constructed during the intense 48-hour concept-to-prototype student design competition, Dorie's prototype garments earned her a $5,000 Aventura design contract for the Spring 2013 line, a $2,500 donation to San Francisco State University design school's student outplacement program, a profile in Textile Insight and an all-expense paid trip to Winter Market 2012.

 

"I feel so fortunate to have been a part of Project OR," said Amy Dorie, winner of Project OR Cycle 7. "Preparing for the competition, collaborating with the judges and designers onsite, and now meeting so many people in the industry has been invaluable."