The Joy Trip Project | Reporting on the Business, Art & Culture of the Sustainable Active Lifestyle
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Quote of the day / 04.11.2009

"Here is a classic example of observing wildlife and learning their behaviors. In Yellowstone I would often see coyotes hunting voles in the fields. Each one would have a different stalk, approach and leaping technique. After watching, I could learn their behavior and anticipate when they would get ready to pounce. It was amazing the success rate they had." This photograph and advice from Chris Gibbs...

Quote of the day / 03.11.2009

“Confront the dark parts of yourself, and work to banish them with illumination and forgiveness. Your willingness to wrestle with your demons will cause your angels to sing. Use the pain as fuel, as a reminder of your strength.” August Wilson ~  American playwright. His literary legacy is the ten play series, The Pittsburgh Cycle, for which he received two Pulitzer Prizes for Drama. Each is set in a different decade, depicting the comic and tragic aspects of the African-American experience in the twentieth century. (1945 – October 2,...

Commentary / 02.11.2009

SeaTurtle_001 In the world of social media I have no fans, only friends. I’m very fortunate that a few hundred people follow my work on the Joy Trip Project. Most are strangers, but that’s only because we haven’t met yet. Everyone is a friend. So when Joel Knutson messaged me by Facebook I was more than happy to meet him for coffee. My work would suffocate in a vacuum of isolation. Conversations with even the most causal acquaintance can often lead to profound revelations. This was no exception.
Podcast / 30.10.2009

ChicksRock Empowered women like Kim Reynolds call themselves what they like. This Chick runs a business out of Colorado showing other women how to climb rock and ice called Chicks Rock. "It’s fun. I think sharing life experiences, climbing experiences, there’s a certain comradery," Reynolds said. " Someone might have the same challenges or same talents or whatever as I as do and it’s nice to experience that with other women." A few weeks ago Kim, a certified mountain guide and life coach, lead a small group of women on a rock climbing trip to a local crag about 40 miles north of Madison, Wisconsin,  a spot called Devil’s Lake. I only came out for the day to take pictures and ask a few questions. Because on this trip there were no men allowed. "I think men are fun. I don’t want to leave them out, but there’s also a trend toward more and more women’s trips I think," Reynolds said. "And women wanting to do things with other women and learn from other women and have that opportunity." In the world of adventure women are busting out on their own. They’re leaving husbands, boyfriends and children at home to discover their strengths and celebrate the feminine side of the wild. Hear their story in this edition of The Joy Trip Project.