Interview

Diversity, Interview, Podcast / 11.12.2009

MajoraCarter_001

An interview with urban

revitalization strategist Majora Carter

JTP: Delegates from about 190 countries are gathering over the next two weeks at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Although this is a landmark event, the largest meeting ever to discuss the environmental future of our planet. I’m a little concerned that we may not be talking about the most important issues. The other night on NPR David Kestenbaum reported on the first day of the conference. In his report on All Things Considered he said everyone pretty much agrees that we have to do something about climate change. But how I see it where the problem lies is that the delegates also seem to share the same disagreements NPR: In fact most of the disagreements, they’re all about money. Developing countries like Bolivia are arguing “Hey The global warming problem? you in the developed world made it. So to solve it you’re going to have to give us money to adapt and to keep our emissions down as we grow. JTP: The industrial growth that caused the climate change crisis in the first place will apparently continue. You see it seems that the Copenhagen delegates are really only arguing about who gets to continue to pollute the atmosphere with carbon gas emissions and how much. The conversation so far seems to be relegated to trading carbon credits for cash so the developing world can continue to build factories and produce consumer goods. But at what cost? What about the environment? And what about millions of disenfranchised people in the U.S. and around the world that will be most directly impacted as our planet’s climate continues to change in the wake of human progress? I won’t be attending the conference in Copenhagen. But a few weeks ago I did attend the Breaking the Color Barrier to the Great Outdoors conference in Atlanta. A few hundred African American Environmentalist gathered to talk among other things about the role people of color can play in protecting the natural world. There I met Majora Carter, the 2005 winner of the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant. She received $500,000 to developed her ideas on creating sustainable urban communities. And while we didn’t talk about Copenhagen in particular Carter has a rather unique perspective how best to curb some of the social effects of Climate Change. Carter: The McArthur Foundation dubbed me an urban revitalization strategist. Which I love, because of the work that I did around pioneering one of the first green jobs training systems in the country, really doing community based, led project development in one of the poorest congressional districts in the country that’s also one of the most environmentally challenged. And the idea was that you can do development that met both the environmental as well as economic needs of a very poor communities and give them the tools they need to enjoy it and be a part of its development. JTP: The environmental issues that our planet faces aren’t limited to carbon emissions. Though green houses gases are indeed the primary cause of global warming it’s the institutions and practices of human behavior that create them. Carter believes that we need to develop community based initiatives that produce green jobs and allow ordinary people take an active part in the cessation carbon emitting industries.     In order to make lasting change in the fight again climate change we have to rethink how we develop and live in our urban centers. And for many communities around world that’s going to mean taking a hard look at issues of social justice, how we treat the urban poor as well as racial and ethnic minorities. I’m James Mills and you’re listening to The Joy Trip Project.
Banff, Film preview, Interview, Mountain Film, Podcast / 15.11.2009

An interview with mountaineer Peter Athans

Mountaineer Peter Athans Photograph by Robert Mackinlay We’ve explored much of the modern world. Today very little is left to tempt the imagination. We’ve succeeded in climbing the highest mountains. We’ve traveled to the depths of the ocean. There’s not much of our planet that we haven’t seen. It would seem then now that what remains of adventure, at least on earth, isn’t to discover where human beings have yet to go but instead where we’ve been. A new film by produced in cooperation PBS and National Geographic takes a look at the discovery and exploration of an ancient civilization. The new film The Secrets of Shangri-La: Quest for Secret Caves premiered at the 2009 Banff Mountain Film Festival.  In this edition of The Joy Trip Project producer and professional mountain guide Peter Athans takes us on an amazing journey to reveal the great mysteries of a long-ago culture once forgotten.
Interview, Podcast / 15.10.2009

CarrHagerman There’s a good chance that you’re one of those creative types. I’ll bet you’re the kind of person who derives a great deal of satisfaction from what you can make or do with your hands. You might play an instrument or you draw or maybe you like sing. And sometimes while you’re cooking I imagine you’ve been known to dance a little to the music on your CD player while you stir a pot of spaghetti sauce. And if don’t have one those jobs where paint, design clothes or build models, or even if you do in spare time you probably like to hike or climb or maybe mountain bike. All these are the many things we do express ourselves, how we perform to show the world who we really are. Knowing how to express yourself is an incredible gift and a talent Carr Hagerman learned to develop at early age.When he was 14 Carr started working as a street performer at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival. Using improvisational comedy and a host of characters he played off the energy of the crowds he entertained to create something special out of nothing but human interaction.
Interview / 25.08.2009

Evonne Blythers Evonne Blythers is an avid outdoorswoman. After a lifetime of recreation for her personal enjoyment she now helps others in her community experience nature in comfort and safety. Blythers is the director of the volunteer outdoor outreach organization “Keeping It Wild” in Atlanta, Georgia. She’s also a finalist for the Cox Conserves Heroes program in recognition for her work promoting diversity in the environmental protection movement. In this interview Blythers shares her story. ~ Evonne is a finalist for Atlanta's 2009 Cox Conserves Heroes program.  The finalist with the most votes receives $5K to donate to their environmental  nonprofit of choice.  Please vote for Evonnne Blythers at http://tinyurl.com/l3p534 ~ voting ends August 31.
Cycling, Interview, Outdoor Recreation / 06.08.2009

Tandem 4 Alan Winslow and Morrigan McCarthy recently returned home after a very long trip. Over 10 months and 11,000 miles these two travelers road bicycles across the country and back again. Departing from New York in October of 2008, they pedaled down the Atlantic Coast, across the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean. They road up through the Pacific Northwest, over the Rocky Mountains, back across the Plains and returned to the Adirondacks in early August. -- In itself, this is not such an amazing feat. But as Winslow and McCarthy made their way across the county they collected a series of personal interviews and incredible photographs. Their mission was to document the nation’s thoughts on the subject of the climate change. --

Winslow and McCarthy spoke to ordinary people in big cities and small towns throughout the United States. Their plan was to discover the overlooked stories of everyday Americans who struggle with notions of human contributions to a warming planet and they role they might play in environmental protection. In their blog called Project Tandem the two share their pictures and tales of people they encountered on their journey. In this interview they tell us a little about their experience.