Photography

Environmental Protection, Manic Media Monday, Mountain Film, Photography, Skiing / 28.02.2011

Protests over collective bargaining continue into their third week here in Wisconsin.  Despite a turnout of almost 80,000 who reject the Budget Repair Bill, Governor Walker is holding firm in his assertion that the State’s deficit of $137 million can only be resolved by stripping unions of their right to negotiate for benefits such as better working conditions and health care. Although this blog is dedicated to telling stories about the sustainable active lifestyle it’s important that we recognize the value that hard working public employees bring to the protection of our wild and scenic places. In this country men and women on the payroll of state and federal governments perform the service of conservation. In it less for the money than their love of the natural environment these unionized workers typically settle for low wages, fewer vacation days and medical benefits in order to do the vital work of protecting our green spaces.
Africa, Breaking News, Climbing, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Ethiopia, Manic Media Monday, Photography / 14.02.2011

It’s good to finally be caught up. After months of road trips, foreign travel and writing projects this Monday morning I suddenly find myself at the top the news cycle ready to take another lap. Now that Season Three of the Joy Trip Project is well underway it’s time to start taking a look around the world of adventure see what’s going on. Here are six stories to watch this week: Imagine One Day Opens Registration for Ethiopia Tour 2011:   [caption id="attachment_4575" align="alignright" width="368"] Majka Burhardt setting new routes in Ethiopia[/caption] If...

Adventure Activism, Climate Change, Environmental Journalism, Photography, Podcast / 10.01.2011

Any photographer will tell you, seeing is believing. But when it comes to climate change, a long slow process that occurs over time, its difficult to capture a single image that demonstrates the sheer magnitude of this global crisis. Even though the most obvious and apparent result of our warming planet is the recession of glacial ice, in some of the most remote places in the world it’s hard to truly show how relatively quickly and dramatically that ice is melting. So photographer James Balog came up with a plan to record the progress of climate change by taking a series of pictures from specific locations near glaciers over the course of several months. "We have time-lapse cameras installed permanently at these various glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Montana, Alaska and soon to be around Mount Everest," Balog said. "And these cameras shoot every half hour around the clock as long as it’s daylight and they’re looking down on these glaciers that are changing and we make this visual record of the landscape in flux." Called the Extreme Ice Survey these images around the world shot on tripods show the cascade of glacial ice as it forms and then melts. The passage of time is quickly sped up to show the pace of change and its apparent progress.
Africa, Environmental Protection, philanthropy, Photography / 16.12.2010

[caption id="attachment_4413" align="alignleft" width="500" caption="Photo by Rachel Meyer"][/caption]

Filmmakers, fashionistas and philanthropists pulled it together in Portland to benefit elephants in danger of extinction due to the illegal ivory trade. The Go Wild Night of Fashion event raised money and awareness for a media and research partnership that aims to document the DNA of pachyderms picked off by poachers.

Art, Charitable Giving, philanthropy, Photography / 26.04.2010

On a rainy Sunday afternoon I spent several hours in my basement cutting glass. Taking a break from a long week of writing it was a pleasant diversion. With my mind and my hands I created something tangible, unlike my stories, an expression of art you can feel and touch. In the process though I seem to have manifest a better understanding of my life’s purpose.