Photography

Adventure Activism, Adventure Media Review, Cycling, Outdoor Recreation, Photography / 30.11.2011

Back in January I reported on the plans of photojournalists Alan Winslow and Morrigan McCarthy to map the minds of young people around the world. Riding bicycles from Anchorage, Alaska the two are peddling across 50 countries and over 30,000 miles on an expedition to discover what their 20-something peers are thinking about. The Geography of Youth project began in July and I managed to catch Morrigan on the phone for an update as she and Alan made their way across the boarder into Mexico. “We’ll cruise through Central and South America and then we head on to Africa,” she said.
Art, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Natural History, Photography / 28.11.2011

  Photojournalists Benjamin Drummond and Sara Joy Steele want to show a side of science that often goes overlooked. Based more on observation and than hard data-based research natural history is science so soft as to be considered art. The role of natural historians has long been to document the current state of life on our planet. And in the hopes of capturing the thoughts and impressions of leading experts on the subject the Natural History Network commissioned Drummond and Steele to help tell their story.
Adventure Activism, Africa, Charitable Giving, Climbing, Environmental Justice, Ethiopia, philanthropy, Photography / 12.08.2011

A caravan of five Land Cruisers bounces along a rocky path. Five hundred miles north of Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, the village of Atsemba is only accessible by a dirt road, and the nearest town is over an hour away. The passage is not so much a road as it is simply the clearest line of travel across a dusty landscape scattered with stones and scrub grass.

In this remote region of East Africa, donkeys are more common than cars. And the arrival of so many sport utility vehicles in this austere community of 3,200 draws an excitable crowd Laughing voices rise with the sound of beating drums. Ululations and cheers from the growing throng are jubilant, welcoming. People of the village and the surrounding community come running to meet honored guests-17 tired travelers. Their white skin and pristine sportswear are a stark contrast against the dark complexions and second-hand cotton clothing of the villagers. But everyone shares broad smiles and eyes that shine bright with excitement. The visitors, from North America and Australia, are eager to see their vision of foreign aid brought to life in the shape of a four-room schoolhouse they helped to fund here. The people of Atsemba are just as anxious to show them. Children are quick to take the strangers’ hands as they enter the heart of the village. The new arrivals exchange greetings with village elders, some offering handshakes, others offering hugs. It’s a boisterous and happy parade of strangers, one of which-a tall, athletic blond woman-tries to go unnoticed. She’s hard to miss, and, as she’d visited Atsemba before, a few of the villagers recognize her as the catalyst for the occasion. She smiles warmly, but Shannon Wilson tries not to draw anyone’s attention. It’s clear she doesn’t want today’s celebration to be about her. Even as she cuts a bright pink ribbon to dedicate the new building at the Atsemba Community Primary School she has very few words. “We hope that your children will envision a brighter future for themselves.”
Adventure Activism, Art, Environmental Justice, Photography / 25.05.2011

Long after a natural disaster fades from the headlines the human tragedy continues. To most, the Sumatra earthquake and tsunami of 2004 is a distant memory. But a young photographer from Wyoming wants the world to keep in mind the thousands who died and hundreds of thousands more who survived but still suffer. Becca Skinner wants to tell their story. And working in collaboration with photographer James Balog and a grant from National Geographic, she and fellow student Chris Michael will make sure we never forget. “A place after a natural disaster is in the media for only a short period of time,” Skinner said. “Communities rebuild or don’t rebuild behind closed doors. Nobody really pays attention to how communities recover.”