Environmental Protection

Adventure Activism, Adventure Media Review, Banff, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Film Festival, Film Review / 11.11.2011

Every initiative to protect the environment needs a charismatic poster species. When it comes to the controversial tar sands debate that endangered animal is the rare and genetically unique Spirit Bear. A black bear with a recessive gene that turns its fur white is the star of the award winning film Spoil. And with fewer than 400 remaining in the wild the Spirit Bear is at the heart of reasons why activists aim to preserve the pristine Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia. Produced and directed by National Geographic...

Adventure Activism, Adventure Media Review, Environmental Protection, Examiner.com, Stand Up Paddling / 17.08.2011

An open water channel crossing of the Hawaii Islands will always make for good cinema. And in that Destination 3 Degrees, a film by Chris Aguilar and Soul Surf Media Productions, does not disappoint. Though hardly a triumph of movie-making, the film pulls together the key components of a complex recipe that blends adventure and conservation goals to document an amazing athletic achievement.
Adventure Activism, Charitable Giving, Environmental Protection, Kids in Nature, Outdoor Recreation, philanthropy / 01.07.2011

Ten outdoor activists are vying for a cash prize to support their unique causes. Product manufacturer L.L. Bean is looking to you to cast your vote to select the fourth annual Outdoor Heroes Award. If you’re looking for a way to help make a difference in the world here’s something quick and simple you can do right now to lend a hand to at least one individual who’s working to make life on the planet a little better for all of us. It just takes a few minutes to make a selection and cast your vote!
Destinations, Environmental Protection, Interview, National Parks, PBS, Podcast, Television, Yosemite / 19.04.2011

01 Lee Stetson 1 Yosemite Valley California, president day: I’m walking with my recorder along a wooded path with a long bearded man wearing period clothing circa 1890, a tweed coat, a wool vest with a red pocket square and wide brimmed hat. Ahead of us is Yosemite Falls, a massive flowage of water running white and fast, churning with melted snow from the high country upstream. The man describes a fanciful vision of what we see. "Can you imagine? Can you imagine if in the midst of its headlong descent with all this whirling fairy springtime spray and those rushing comet tails that the fall was suddenly frozen solid and then carried bodily out into the middle of the valley that we might go around it and see it from all sides in the sunshine,” he says. “Oh was a show it would make. This colossal white pillar half a mile tall adorned with airy flowing drapery as if chiseled out of white marble.” Who better with whom to tour one of America’s greatest National Parks than the man himself John Muir. As if transported back in time I had the rare opportunity to get his impressions on Yosemite today.
Adventure Media Review, Environmental Protection, National Parks, PBS, Television, Yosemite / 18.04.2011

The idea of wilderness conservation would seem to be a foregone conclusion. But at the turn of the last century private interests of corporate greed may well have developed the wild and scenic places we enjoy today well out of existence. Prized then for their vast resources of timber, fresh water and minerals these lands are valued now more for their intrinsic beauty and awe-inspiring tranquility. Had it not been for the passionate and articulate voice of a Scottish-American from Wisconsin our system of National Parks and Conservation Areas may have never been established. John Muir will long be remembered as the founder of the Sierra Club and a great advocate for the protection of the natural world. A new PBS American Masters documentary of his life tells the story of early experiences that formed his character to become the man we know today. Directed by Catherine Tatage John Muir in the New World provides the back-story that details many of the little known influences of his upbringing that inspired him to venture west and explore what remained of the North American frontier.
Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Expedition News, National Geographic, National Parks / 24.03.2011

 

National Geographic Young Explorers Dashiell Masland and Trevor Frost are contending to save the world, at least a small piece of it. Hoping to continue work in progress both are angling to raise awareness for the preservation of wild animal species in remote corners of the planet. Going head-to-head in a competition for funding to support their respective conservation projects, the two want your vote in the Expedition Granted contest.

As part of Expedition Week that starts April 3rd on the National Geographic Channel, viewers are invited to register online and cast their ballots for the explorer they like best. With the added incentive of winning a free trip to the Galapagos Islands for themselves, voters have the chance to provide Trevor or Dash with an expedition grant worth $10,000.