Environmental Protection

Assignment Earth, Environmental Protection / 11.06.2010

“Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” – Winston Churchill. When it comes to oil spills no one knows this better than Native Alaskans.  Indigenous Arctic tribes learned their lesson during the Exxon Valdez debacle of 1989. In this edition of Assignment Earth several leaders of the Inupiaq Tribe came south to tour the devastation of the recent British Petroleum disaster that continues to spew toxic crude into the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast. “We had many miles of our beaches like this,” said Alaskan native Earl Kingik. “ A lot of our shore birds fly away and don’t come back to Point Hope due to this kind of oil activity, this oil spill.” [caption id="attachment_3336" align="aligncenter" width="472" caption="Native Alaskan/Exxon Valdez survivor Earl Kingik tours the Gulf Oil Spill"][/caption]
Environmental Protection, Film Festival, Mountain Film / 03.06.2010

[caption id="attachment_3322" align="aligncenter" width="472" caption="Moving Mountains symposium on the extiction crisis"][/caption]

I’m sure it wasn’t just the altitude. Over Memorial Day weekend I nursed a raging headache at Mountain Film in Telluride. There was also a deep churning at the pit of my stomach that made me feel a bit uneasy. But at 9,000 above sea level I believe the symptoms I felt were less due to a lack of oxygen than it was the sudden and intense onslaught of complex ideas, passion stirring images and ire-raising conversations that are typically part of the Mountain Film experience. As passionate artists, athletes and activists come together to share their particular view of life on Earth, most who attend are roused to an emotional reaction they can feel in their hearts and minds as well as their bodies.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Protection, This American Land / 10.05.2010

With government support, a huge land purchase by conservationists protects prime habitat for grizzlies, mountain lions and other sensitive species. In order to maintain wilderness habitat in the Swan Valley of Montana The Nature Conservancy and the Trust for Public Land has bought and set aside 367,000 acres in the Montana Legacy Project. Land once the owned by the state’s biggest private property holder Plum Creek Timber Company is now closed to development. Parcels scattered throughout forested area will be protected as corridors for the free movement of many wild species including large carnivores.
Environmental Justice, Environmental Protection, Film Review, Fun Film Friday / 07.05.2010

The documentary film “Tapped” is a glaring indictment of the bottled water industry. Directed by Stephanie Soechtig this expansive look into the commercial acquisition, production and distribution of the Earth’s most precious natural resource, fresh drinking water, is a horrifying tale of abuse and corruption. The story spans the socio-political landscape from small municipalities to multi-national corporations across the globe. But at its heart the film speaks to the personal responsibility each of us must assume in the perpetuation of a product that we freely purchase as its consumption and improper disposal is slowly killing us.