Environmental Protection

Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Sustainable Living / 23.03.2011

  Making the growing season grow longer, that’s the idea for Daphne Yannakakis, an organic farmer in western Colorado. Along with husband Don Lareau on Zephyros Farm, they’re growing vegetables in wintertime as part of a study by Colorado State University. The vegetables grow under the protection of unheated green houses called high tunnels, which hold in heat stored by the Earth at night and capture solar heat during the day. They also provide protection from the wind. These farmers plant a variety of cold hardy vegetables at monthly intervals and record weather data electronically with custom software. The data is collected from five farms across Colorado and will be compiled and made available to other small-scale farmers. Funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and called the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program or SARE, the study is intended to help small-scale farmers in the Rocky Mountains remain productive and profitable through much of the winter by utilizing high tunnels. Even when outside temperatures reach sub-zero extremes these simple structures allow vegetables to survive harsh winter conditions and enable farmers to grow more.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection / 11.03.2011

  Collisions with automobiles make it pretty clear where Mule Deer don’t make it across the road. But what researchers want to find out is where they do. The answer is important as officials in Wyoming get ready to expand major highways -some up to five lanes- that run through this wildlife rich gateway to Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks.   “If we can figure out where animals are crossing, we can at least hope to reduce some of those wildlife vehicle collisions, which will help from a population perspective to keep the animals alive,” said Embere Hall of Teton Science Schools. “Secondly it will help improve human safety. No one wants to hit an animal with their car.” A three-year study is underway to better understand the highway-crossing behavior of mule deer. At a cost of my more than $300,000 this labor intensive project aims to discover exactly how animals maneuver through this increasingly busy valley.
Africa, Charitable Giving, Climate Change, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Justice, Environmental Protection, Ethiopia, Manic Media Monday, philanthropy / 07.03.2011

  There’s hardly a storage of news to be had in our worldwide 24/7 media cycle. What’s remarkable is the sheer volume of information out there that tends to clog the pipe and make it difficult to find those articles that truly help to shape our thoughts. For those of us engaged in an active sustainable lifestyle there are several stories worth following this week that can both inspire and encourage our personal efforts to make the world a better place.
Environmental Protection, Music, The Give Review / 02.03.2011

Outdoor clothing manufacturer Patagonia announced Tuesday a new initiative to promote environmental causes through the sale of popular music. Backed by bands Pearl Jam, The Bad Plus and Toad the West Sprocket along with performers Jack Johnson and Brett Dennen, the company aims to let customers support conservation efforts for every $.99 download from iTunes through the Patagonia Music Collective
Environmental Protection, Manic Media Monday, Mountain Film, Photography, Skiing / 28.02.2011

Protests over collective bargaining continue into their third week here in Wisconsin.  Despite a turnout of almost 80,000 who reject the Budget Repair Bill, Governor Walker is holding firm in his assertion that the State’s deficit of $137 million can only be resolved by stripping unions of their right to negotiate for benefits such as better working conditions and health care. Although this blog is dedicated to telling stories about the sustainable active lifestyle it’s important that we recognize the value that hard working public employees bring to the protection of our wild and scenic places. In this country men and women on the payroll of state and federal governments perform the service of conservation. In it less for the money than their love of the natural environment these unionized workers typically settle for low wages, fewer vacation days and medical benefits in order to do the vital work of protecting our green spaces.
Banff, Environmental Protection, Film Festival, Film Review, Sustainable Living / 24.02.2011

A father wants what’s best for his children. In his film Mi Chacra (My Land), director Jason Burlage explores a year in the life of a Peruvian farmer as he struggles to make a better life for his son. Taking top honors at the Banff Mountain Film Festival this documentary feature depicts the world of laborers who divide their time between planting crops and carrying loads for tourists on the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu.