Environmental Journalism

Adventure Media Review, Environmental Journalism, Manic Media Monday / 29.08.2011

  If you were stuffed in a snow cave, out in the backcountry, climbing a rock or otherwise just too busy to check into your regular news channels here are six of the top stories in Adventure Media to follow this week:  Los Angeles River Tries On New Role, as Waterway http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/26/us/26river.html?_r=1&ref=travel The Los Angeles river was once a drainage ditch filled with floating debry and rusting shopping carts. A new pilot program from the Los Angeles Conservation Corps opens urban waterway to recreational kayaking  
Capital Region Business Journal, Charitable Giving, Environmental Journalism, Gardening, Madison, Magazines, philanthropy, Sustainable Living / 22.06.2011

Teachers, students and parents gathered to celebrate the destruction of a school. Defunct for many years the building that once housed Badger Rock Middle School was finally demolished in late March to make way for a new vision of secondary education. A modern construct will stand its place to offer lessons in growing vegetables, healthy nutrition and living in a sustainable community.
Adventure Activism, Banff, Breaking News, Environmental Journalism, Mountain Film / 31.03.2011

I’m no critic. I’m actually more of a commentator, and if you’re a creator of adventure inspired media I’m looking to tell your story. Adventure media, movies, music, photographs and art, are in a genre all of their own. Truly unique expressions of active lifestyle culture, action pics, conservation documentaries, original songs, sculptures and paintings, help to fuel the passions of those eager for that next exciting journey. Artists, athletes and activists are cranking out hundreds of new works, feature films and web-based shorts that inspire a growing audience of millions around the world to both chase their dreams and fight to protect the wild places where they love to play. And the Joy Trip Project is where they meet to share their stories.
Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Expedition News, National Geographic, National Parks / 24.03.2011

 

National Geographic Young Explorers Dashiell Masland and Trevor Frost are contending to save the world, at least a small piece of it. Hoping to continue work in progress both are angling to raise awareness for the preservation of wild animal species in remote corners of the planet. Going head-to-head in a competition for funding to support their respective conservation projects, the two want your vote in the Expedition Granted contest.

As part of Expedition Week that starts April 3rd on the National Geographic Channel, viewers are invited to register online and cast their ballots for the explorer they like best. With the added incentive of winning a free trip to the Galapagos Islands for themselves, voters have the chance to provide Trevor or Dash with an expedition grant worth $10,000.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Sustainable Living / 23.03.2011

  Making the growing season grow longer, that’s the idea for Daphne Yannakakis, an organic farmer in western Colorado. Along with husband Don Lareau on Zephyros Farm, they’re growing vegetables in wintertime as part of a study by Colorado State University. The vegetables grow under the protection of unheated green houses called high tunnels, which hold in heat stored by the Earth at night and capture solar heat during the day. They also provide protection from the wind. These farmers plant a variety of cold hardy vegetables at monthly intervals and record weather data electronically with custom software. The data is collected from five farms across Colorado and will be compiled and made available to other small-scale farmers. Funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and called the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program or SARE, the study is intended to help small-scale farmers in the Rocky Mountains remain productive and profitable through much of the winter by utilizing high tunnels. Even when outside temperatures reach sub-zero extremes these simple structures allow vegetables to survive harsh winter conditions and enable farmers to grow more.
Camping, Environmental Journalism, Film Review, Kids in Nature, Outdoor Recreation / 18.03.2011

“The landscape of childhood has changed.” From the opening frames of Play Again, directed by Tonje Hessen Schei, the documentary makes it clear that the world we knew as children is fundamentally different than it is today. With a proliferation of technology that captivates both the time and attention of young people, a generation of humanity is emerging out of touch with the natural world. And as teenagers spend more and more time playing video games and surfing the web indoors the producers of this feature-length movie warn that as they grow to become adults they may be deprived of the very experiences that make us human.