Environmental Journalism

Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Video / 16.02.2011

The Rio Grande flows through some of the oldest continually inhabited land in the United States. In northern New Mexico, the river follows a deep gorge formed by the separation of the Earth’s crust. Because of its wild and pristine state it’s home to a rich population of birds and mammals and is one of the world’s great migratory fly-aways linking the United States and Canada for hundreds of migrating bird species.

For the past 30 years concerned citizens and lawmakers have been working to create the Rio Grande Del Norte National Conservation Area along New Mexico’s northern boarder. The proposed NCA consists of 235,000 acres of rolling sagebrush hills and 70 miles of the Rio Grande, the first section of wild and scenic river established in the United States. The goal is not only to preserve this rare and wild landscape, but also a way of life that dates back hundreds of years.

Africa, Breaking News, Climbing, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection, Ethiopia, Manic Media Monday, Photography / 14.02.2011

It’s good to finally be caught up. After months of road trips, foreign travel and writing projects this Monday morning I suddenly find myself at the top the news cycle ready to take another lap. Now that Season Three of the Joy Trip Project is well underway it’s time to start taking a look around the world of adventure see what’s going on. Here are six stories to watch this week: Imagine One Day Opens Registration for Ethiopia Tour 2011:   [caption id="attachment_4575" align="alignright" width="368"] Majka Burhardt setting new routes in Ethiopia[/caption] If...

Assignment Earth, Climate Change, Environmental Journalism, National Parks, Video / 03.02.2011

A love of backcountry skiing explains David Gonzales’ obsession with white bark pines. A writer and photographer, he spends a lot of time beneath these ancient trees. But the white barks are under attack. And that has this skier marshaling forces to fight back. Once the snow melts, he leads volunteers called Tree Fighters into the forest surrounding Yellowstone National Park. Tree Fight is an organization that is working to curb the loss of white bark pines due to the escalating impact of climate change. Scientists say rising temperatures have opened the door to a mountain pine beetle invasion. White barks live at the highest, harshest elevations in the northwestern United States and Southwestern Canada. Extremely cold temperatures used to keep this native pest at lower elevations. Now these beetles are capitalizing on warmer temperatures, killing white barks at a staggering rate. Tree Fight aims to stop them.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Video / 23.01.2011

Fossil Creek is a conservation success story. This river that flows through the Mazatzal Mountains of Central Arizona has been reclaimed for the preservation of species habitat and recreation for the residents of nearby Phoenix. The removal a dam built at the turn of the last century has made it possible for Fossil Creek to return to its natural state of pristine beauty. Unfortunately the influx of human visitors has put the newly restored Fossil Creek at risk. The impact of automobile and foot traffic, plus a proliferation of garbage could very well undo the scenic and ecological features that make this conservation land worth protecting.

Adventure Activism, Climate Change, Environmental Journalism, Photography, Podcast / 10.01.2011

Any photographer will tell you, seeing is believing. But when it comes to climate change, a long slow process that occurs over time, its difficult to capture a single image that demonstrates the sheer magnitude of this global crisis. Even though the most obvious and apparent result of our warming planet is the recession of glacial ice, in some of the most remote places in the world it’s hard to truly show how relatively quickly and dramatically that ice is melting. So photographer James Balog came up with a plan to record the progress of climate change by taking a series of pictures from specific locations near glaciers over the course of several months. "We have time-lapse cameras installed permanently at these various glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Montana, Alaska and soon to be around Mount Everest," Balog said. "And these cameras shoot every half hour around the clock as long as it’s daylight and they’re looking down on these glaciers that are changing and we make this visual record of the landscape in flux." Called the Extreme Ice Survey these images around the world shot on tripods show the cascade of glacial ice as it forms and then melts. The passage of time is quickly sped up to show the pace of change and its apparent progress.
Assignment Earth, Environmental Journalism, Environmental Protection / 10.12.2010

Fossil Creek is a newly preserved wild and scenic river  that may again be at risk due to the very efforts meant to protect it. In a video from Assignment Earth producer Jay Canode tells the story of a beautiful body of water that flows through the Mazatzal Mountains of Central Arizona.  With the removal of a hydroelectric damn put in place at the turn of the last century Fossil Creek has been reborn to provide habitat to scores of fish and animal species and recreation opportunities to thousands of human visitors.