The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com Reporting the business art and culture of the active lifestyle Tue, 09 Jan 2018 23:00:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.4 https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/cropped-JTPLogo-Prime.png?fit=32%2C32 The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com 32 32 http://joytripproject.com/feed/podcast/ James Edward Mills clean James Edward Mills james@joytripproject.com james@joytripproject.com (James Edward Mills) 2017 The Joy Trip Project Reporting on the business art and culture of the sustainable active lifestyle james@joytripproject.com TV-G Madison, WI 42686986 Alice's Garden - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2017/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/ Fri, 20 Oct 2017 13:00:37 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064487 http://joytripproject.com/2017/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2017/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/AlicesGardenSign.jpg?fit=5472%2C2799" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world. Modern agriculture is such a big deal, because things like soil […] It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world. It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world. Modern agriculture is such a big deal, because things like soil health and water quality directly impact the nutrition, physical health and wellbeing of people all over the world.  But farms no matter how big or small also have a profound effect on the overall safety and security of nearby  rivers and lakes.
Across North America watersheds that span hundred, even thousand of miles connect our forests upstream to densely populated cities where urban people depend upon the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables, sustainably raised meat and dairy products and of course safe drinking water. So agriculture was pretty heavy in my thoughts when I reached out to my friend Amy Kober. She’s the director of communications at the nonprofit American Rivers and I was really just checking in to see what kind of initiatives they might be working on in relation to watersheds and farming.
“Well, it just so happens ,”she said “we’re about to release a new film we produced on the Milwaukee River.” Amy sent me a link to a film called Alice’s Garden. There I could stream it online in advance and I was pretty blown away in the first two minutes of watching it. Milwaukee is about an hour and half from my front door and I had never heard of Alice’s Garden. Located in the heart of downtown this green patch of land is surrounded the urban core. With systems in place to retain rainwater and restore the capacity of the soil to support growing things, Alice’s Garden helps people who live in the neighborhood to experience nature in meaningful ways through the cultivation of fresh vegetables. But what really struck me most was the environmental justice angle of this very cool short film.
“If we’re going to be honest, the river of Milwaukee and Lake Michigan are places that have been refashioned more for white people with means than for the community I serve on a daily basis,” said Venice Williams, an African-American woman who is the executive director of Alice’s Garden. “I personally love going downtown and I love the riverwalk, but when I look up, there are very few people who look like me. So I think the rivers in this city, if we’re going to be honest, have been some of those places of segregation and divide.”
It didn’t take long for me to realize that I wanted to learn more about this remarkable place in one of the most urbanized cities in North America. So I made the drive cross-state to have a conversation with Venice Williams at Fondy Farmers Market in heart of the African-American community in Downtown Milwaukee. There just a few blocks away where she and members of her community grow their own vegetables she told me all  about Alice’s Garden.

Alice’s Garden from American Rivers on Vimeo.

 
 
 
Music this week provided by Low Tree or Ziv Moran You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, clean 13:41 2064487
Ranger Betty Reid Soskin - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2017/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/ Wed, 12 Jul 2017 12:00:41 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064330 http://joytripproject.com/2017/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2017/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i1.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/RangerBettyReidSoskinCover.jpg?fit=5472%2C2782" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>  At 95 years young National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during one of the most turbulent periods in time. Drawing on her personal experience through the […]   At 95 years young National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during ...  
At 95 years young
National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during one of the most turbulent periods in time. Drawing on her personal experience through the 1940s she offers a compelling look into the past that helps us to understand who we are today and chart a course toward a brighter tomorrow. As an African-American woman who endured and survived the racially motivated oppression of previous generations, Ranger Soskin offers young people of color especially the hope and motivation to become leaders and role models themselves in the future.

Ranger Soskin addressed a gathering of more than 200 young people of color at an event called the PGM ONE Summit in Berkeley, California. PGM stands for People of the Global Majority, an emerging new generation of black and brown people around the world who are mobilizing to achieve lasting social change. Much like those of her generation who rallied to confront the   threat of foreign armies during World War II Soskin wants the young people of today to stand up against the rising challenges of the 21st century.
“I’ve live now for almost 96 years. And what I have learn in those 96 years is the fact that ever since 1776 my nation has experienced an upward spiral, ciclical periods of chaos,” Soskin said. “And it’s in those periods of chaos that democracy is redefined. We’re in another one of those now. Those periods provide opportunities to reset the buttons, allows us to redefine what demoncracy means. And to get on with the project of forming that more perfect union.”
After so many years of life experience in this country Ranger Soskin understands that the great experiment of democracy is an ongoing process. Like ascending a spiral staircase we wind our way round and round, getting higher and higher though we seem to find ourselves in the same place time and time again. And here we are back to once more test and redefine the integrity of American democracy. We’ve here before.
Right after her talk in Berkeley Ranger Soskin shared with me her thoughts on our history and the roles each us may play to protect the legacy of our future.

Music in this episode by Oren Tsor and Muted 

]]> James Edward Mills clean 22:24 2064330 The Delicious Wind - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2017/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:00:12 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064286 http://joytripproject.com/2017/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2017/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/RHOutsideMagazineCover.jpg?fit=1400%2C800" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2,179 miles from Georgia to Maine under the power of her own two feet over several months in 2016. In her fascinating story, one […] Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2, Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2,179 miles from Georgia to Maine under the power of her own two feet over several months in 2016. In her fascinating story, one passage in particular stood out.
“Throughout my youth, my grandmother and I took walks in Miami, where I’d hear her say the words tuum nifas,” Haile wrote. “It meant a delicious wind, a nourishing wind. These experiences shaped how I viewed movement throughout the natural world. How I view it still. The elements, I thought, could end my hunger.”


Transformational experiences in nature are perhaps the single most compelling reason that anyone would devote months of their lives and thousands of miles walking the great National Scenic trails of North America. Every year trails like the Appalachian, the Continental Divide or the Pacific Crest draw hikers from across the country and around the world to sample the delicious, nourishing winds of the world outside. Many spend these long hikes in quiet reflection of their lives, while others use this time to heal the emotional wounds of their past. In that regard Rahawa Haile was no different. But during the intensely divisive and politically polarizing climate of the 2016 Presidential election she felt the added burdens of race and gender identity in a natural environment populated predominantly by white men.
The disparities of participation among those who spend time in nature and those who don’t still fall dramatically along the same distinctions of race, gender and class that divide much of our country today. But on her long journey Haile was pleased to discover that she was welcomed and encouraged to become part of the Appalachian Trail community despite hiking while bisexual, female and black.
This interview with writer and Appalachian Trail through-hiker Rahawa Haile was recorded in a coffee shop in Oakland, California. Sorry about all the ambient noise, but this conversation was definitely worth sharing. Look for a feature story on Haile and the delicious winds of the outdoors in the next issue of the journal Appalachia.

Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro. Check out his latest album Travels now available on iTunes or at Jake Shimabukuro.com

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To Be Brave ~ An interview with Royal Robbins - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2017/to-be-brave/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 18:37:19 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064237 http://joytripproject.com/2017/to-be-brave/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2017/to-be-brave/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Royal_Robbins.jpg?fit=2560%2C1440" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>  On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of Yosemite’s Half Dome and in 1961 he completed an […]   On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of ...  
On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of Yosemite’s Half Dome and in 1961 he completed an ascent of the Salathé Wall on El Capitan. In a long career that included the founding of a global sports apparel brand that bears his name Royal Robbins was a leader in the outdoor industry and a philanthropic supporter of many organizations that encouraged environmental conservation and getting youth outside.
In 2009 at the Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival in Alberta, Canada I had the pleasure of meeting Robbins for the first time. He very graciously agreed to an interview on his book To Be Brave, the first in a series of memoirs that recounted his remarkable life of adventure. In this flashback edition of the podcast I am proud to share for the first time this archived conversation with Royal Robbins.

Music in this edition of the Joy Trip Project by the Ahn Trio 
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Campfire Stories ~ An interview with authors Dave & Ilyssa Kyu - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2017/campfire-stories/ Mon, 23 Jan 2017 14:55:23 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064174 http://joytripproject.com/2017/campfire-stories/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2017/campfire-stories/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i2.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/CampfireStories.jpg?fit=5472%2C3648" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>  In 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments. I know I personally made stops at Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon and Yosemite. It was during this centennial summer that I had […]   In 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments.  
n 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments. I know I personally made stops at Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon and Yosemite. It was during this centennial summer that I had the chance to meet two truly amazing people. Dave and Ilyssa Kyu are graphic artists based in Philadelphia. Through the magic of social media I connected with them in a series of Facebook posts and a remarkable project they had funded through Kickstarter. As they were traveling home after a long journey they just happen to make a stop near my home in Madison, Wisconsin. There we met for breakfast at an outdoor café to hear about more about their recent travels.
“We are just wrapping up a three and half-month trip across the U.S. travel to six national parks,” Ilyssa said. ” We went to Acadia, Smokey Mountains, Rocky Mountains, Zion, to Yosemite and to Yellowstone. We went to each of these national parks to interview all different types of people to help us with the research for our book Campfire Stories.
Anytime you mix the national parks with storytelling you’re definitely going to pique my interest. Dave and Ilyssa’s project sparked a wonderful discussion on the importance identity and a sense of place in the continuing efforts to protect and preserve our public lands for future generations.
“We only started going outdoors as adults,” Dave said. “And we where always curious to learn more about these outdoor places where we were starting to spend so much of our vacation time in. We were looking around for a book of campfire stories from these national parks and didn’t find it so we thought, why don’t we make it!”
Inspired by camping excursions near their home in Philadelphia these two artists ventured out to find others in their tribe of enthusiasts to share their tales of the wild. From the rocky beaches of Acadia National Park in Maine to the granite cliffs of Yosemite Valley in California they drove thousands of miles in search of stories that profoundly express our collective passion for the majestic beauty of the world outdoors. In the tradition of sharing tales of adventure  around a roaring fire while camped out under the stars or huddled under blankets in a rustic lodge Dave and Ilyssa have gathered together a series of exciting narratives in a new book they call Campfire Stories.

The new book Campfire Stories will be out soon. Dave and Ilyssa are taking a bit of break from writing as they embark on another great adventure. They recently welcomed the arrival of a baby daughter named Lula June. You can learn more about their project and even pre-order a copy online at http://campfirestoriesbook.com
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This Moment ~ A conversation with Dr. Carolyn Finney - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2016/0808/ Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:00:45 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064002 http://joytripproject.com/2016/0808/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2016/0808/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/CentennialInitiative20160316-4-e1470661876376.jpg?fit=5458%2C2855" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the natural spaces of the United States for future generations. As […] In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the... In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the natural spaces of the United States for future generations. As our National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary the group aims to make it possible for those in our society least likely to spend time in the outdoors to become passionate stewards of our public land well into the 21st century and beyond. Called the Next 100 Coalition this dynamic assembly of leaders is telling the stories of African-American, Latino, Asian and Native American people of color who have long enjoyed a history and legacy of conservation.
As a member of the Next 100 Coalition, Dr. Carolyn Finney is helping to define a new vision of conservation that will carry us into the future. In the sincere belief that sustainable land management requires the cooperation and participation of all the American people Dr. Finney has crafted a compelling narrative that details the rich cultural heritage of our past while celebrating the great opportunities we enjoy today to build a brighter tomorrow. In this moment she wants us to realize that now is the time to set aside all that had divided us in the past in order to make a better world for the millions of children who will one day inherit the land we leave behind.
I had the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Finney recently in Washington D.C. and she shared with me her wonderful vision of the future in an essay called This Moment. Addressing the potential lives of children born eight years ago at the begining of the administration of President Barack Obama, Finney details a series of challenges and opportunities to make proactive change in the decades which still lie before us.
“What we can do in this moment is work to change the nature of the next moment. What

we can do in this moment is to remember, learn, fight, stand and expand who we are and

who we might become,” she said. “In 2008, 4,247,694 babies were born (in the U.S.). And no matter the color of their hands, they will be reaching for grass, dirt and dreams and we will need all their love and fight and possibility.”
Dr. Finney is the author of the book Black Faces White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. She is a professor geography at the University of Kentucky and you can follow her work online at CarloynFinney.com

This edition of the Joy Trip Project Podcast is part of the New Century Vision Project and is made possible with the support of our partner Choose Outdoors. Find out how you can get connected to our public lands through outdoor recreation at ChooseOutdoors.org. #inclusivevision4next100

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José In The Arctic - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2016/jose-in-the-arctic/ Fri, 22 Jul 2016 15:44:38 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063928 http://joytripproject.com/2016/jose-in-the-arctic/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2016/jose-in-the-arctic/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i1.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/IntoTheArctic2016-29.jpg?fit=5472%2C3648" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we live work and play. One such place is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In a region of […] Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we li...
Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we live work and play. One such place is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In a region of Alaska so remote that it is only accessible by small charter airplane the Arctic Refuge is perhaps the most geographically isolated wilderness area in the continental United States. Very few people will ever visit there, but as the home many different plant and animal species including caribou and grizzly bears this remarkable ecosystem on the shores of the Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Ocean is at the forefront of the modern conservation movement. And as a bellwether of the global impacts of climate change the protection of the Arctic Refuge is a major priority for conservation groups like the Sierra Club and many other environmentally focused community outreach organizations.
José Gonzalez is the founder of Latino Outdoors. His group aims to help members of the Latino community to become engaged in efforts to protect the natural environment. Along with a leader from Outdoor Afro, a group dedicated to helping African American families forge a bond with the natural world,  José and I had the rare opportunity to travel through the Arctic Refuge. Over the span of seven days we paddled more than 50 miles  along the course of the HulaHula river to experience for ourselves the unique beauty of this vast yet fragile natural habitat. In the hopes raising awareness for the importance of this and other distant wilderness areas this trip was organized to help make a connection with emerging communities of color who will one day be called upon to save them.

The purpose of this trip was to help define a new vision of environmental protection, one that includes the participation of all the American people. That means people of color. As the National Park Service celebrates it’s 100th anniversary in 2016 we look forward to a new century of conservation that is more diverse and inclusive. You can get involved. Just follow the hashtag inclusivevision4next100 on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

This edition of the Joy Trip Project Podcast is part of the New Century Vision Project and was made possible with the support of our partner Choose Outdoors. Find out how you can get connected to our public lands through outdoor recreation at ChooseOutdoors.org. #inclusivevision4next100

And special thanks to the Sierra Club for making this Joy Trip possible. Learn more about the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at  clean 2063928
Forget Me Not ~ An interview with Jennifer Lowe-Anker - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2016/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/ Wed, 04 May 2016 17:42:41 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063773 http://joytripproject.com/2016/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2016/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i2.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/jppt_012.jpg?fit=1237%2C830" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the base of Mt Shishapangma. After 17 years the legacy of Alex Lowe is continues through […] If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the ba... If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the base of Mt Shishapangma. After 17 years the legacy of Alex Lowe is continues through the lives his surviving climbing parnter Conrad Anker, his wife Jennifer and his sons Max, Sam and Issac. In his name the Alex Lowe Foundation works support and improve the lives of indigenous people throughout the Himalayan region as well as raise awareness for the importance of avalanche safety and prevention.
In memory of Alex Lowe the Joy Trip Project is reposting an interview with Jennifer Lowe-Anker recorded in 2009. Her memoir  Forget Me Not shares the intimate details of her life after having tragically lost her husband, a climber, only to fall in love all over again with another one.

Have you have ever thought about why you love the things you love most? And not just things, what about people? How do we come to discover those with whom we fall in love? Through the course of our lives I believe we drawn without even realizing it to things, places and people that are important to us, that make us happy. We bring them into our lives and with them comes great joy. But sometimes, actually more often than not, the thing that you love most is what keeps you apart.
Jenny:
I think from the beginning I knew Alex was one of those guys that was kind of like a wild bird that you might entice to hold in your hand but you could never really hold on to him. And that was part of his appeal to me.
JTP:
Jennifer Lowe-Anker was in love with professional climber Alex Lowe. Each with a passion for the outdoors and the wild scenic places of the world, they built a life together of adventure and travel. But with separate careers, Jenny as fine artist, there were many times when the two were apart for long stretches of time while Alex explored
Jenny:
Interestingly enough that’s what I thought of book from the very beginning. I thought this was not going to be the average climbing story. And I’m not going to be doing a biography but what I really wanted was to show people the person that they loved from the most intimate perspective that I could give away of him because there was such an outpouring of grief and love for Alex at his death.
Jenny:
Very soon after we got married I decided to leave him and go off in pursuit of a better job because I didn’t like the fact that I wasn’t making good money and I felt like I was spinning my wheels. It was just a situation we were in and I kind of learned from him that time was precious and I wanting to make good use of my time and thinking when we’re together we could do something fun once we made our money and earned it. So I took off and chose to spend a couple of months apart from him working so that we could have a different dream.
JTP:
Do you have any idea what it was like for him without you?
Jenny:
I certainly do through his letters. He missed me. We missed each other. And we wrote each other a lot. And some of those letters you get to read. He wrote very avidly. I literally have over a thousand letter from Alex through the time we were together.
Jenny:
We were together through our letters a lot. He sat down and wrote me nearly every night when were apart. And sometime it was in a journal form and he would spend me like 5 sheets you know over a period of a week or two weeks and little bits of writing that he did everyday to tell me little pieces of what he lived that day and share that with me. And then I would do the same back to him.]]> James Edward Mills clean 13:55 2063773 Life Or Limb ~ Recovering From The Traumatic Injuries of War - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2016/0415/ Fri, 15 Apr 2016 18:14:28 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063733 http://joytripproject.com/2016/0415/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2016/0415/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i0.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Chad-Jukes-1.jpg?fit=2004%2C1332" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickstarter campaigns as well as provide financial support […] One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickst... One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickstarter campaigns as well as provide financial support to folks in need through Indie-Go-Go. And it was just such a request that reminded me of a story I did in 2008 when I met my good friend Chad Jukes. He’s currently looking for support to climb the highest mountainin the world Mount Everest.
“I’m a staff sergeant in the army,” Jukes had told me. “Back in 2006 I was running convoy security operations over in Iraq and my truck hit an anti-tank mine and ended up shattering my heel bone and breaking my femur.”
Recorded at during the time of the Irag War this interview aimed to explore how soldiers like Jukes were dealing with the aftermath of devasting injuries received in combat.
“After a few months I ended up contracting an infection a fairly serious infection in my heel,” Jukes said. “And when they went in to repair that they discovered that the infection had done a lot of damage to the bone. At that point they gave me a few options. And one of them was amputation.”
At the time Jukes was only 22-years-old and he was faced with one of hardest decisions anyone would ever have to make. Should he abandon the hope of recovering his damaged foot or allow the doctors to remove his leg from below the knee?
At that point I went online and started doing some research and ended up finding a web site called the adaptive climbers organization.com,” Jukes said. “And I went in there and posted on the forums with my situation. Within the day I received responses from Malcolm Daly, Pete Davis, Craig DeMartino and a number of others with advice for me, and just telling me what I could expect if I chose the amputee route.”
The guys who responded to Jukes’ post were all climbers, including my old boss and long-time friend Malcolm Daly. Each of them had opted for amputation rather than preserve a damaged foot or leg. In the hopes of continuing their lives in the most active ways possible these injured athletes provide inspiring role models for wounded soldiers to recover from the tragic circumstance of war to ascend to unimaginable heights. And in this flashback edition of the podcast we’re revisiting the process Jukes endured to put him on track toward an Everest summit.

Our theme music is by Jake Shimabukuro. The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks to fans like you on Patreon. For as little as a dollar month you can support this podcast and many adventure media initiatives covered here. For details visit patreon.com/joytripproject.

Thanks for listening, but as always I want to hear from you. So please write to me with your questions comments and criticisms to info@joytriproproject.com
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Hadwin’s Judgement ~ an interview with author John Vaillant - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2016/hadwinsjudgement/ Thu, 07 Apr 2016 14:12:51 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063708 http://joytripproject.com/2016/hadwinsjudgement/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2016/hadwinsjudgement/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i2.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/HadwinsJudgementCOVER.jpg?fit=1500%2C1000" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>Journalist and author John Vaillant began his career with a profound interest in connecting stories of adventure with complex social issues. And it was on a reporting assignment to the remote regions North Western Canada that put him on the path of a remarkable narrative steeped in both ancient mythology and a modern controversy at […] Journalist and author John Vaillant began his career with a profound interest in connecting stories of adventure with complex social issues. And it was on a reporting assignment to the remote regions North Western Canada that put him on the path of a r... Journalist and author John Vaillant began his career with a profound interest in connecting stories of adventure with complex social issues. And it was on a reporting assignment to the remote regions North Western Canada that put him on the path of a remarkable narrative steeped in both ancient mythology and a modern controversy at the heart of the environmental movement.
“It was thanks to Outside Magazine that I got up there. I was doing a paddling story for them in Haida Gwaii, which is this remote archipelago off the northwest coast of British Columbia, an extraordinary place, home of the Haida Nation,” Vaillant said. “One way to understand them is the Vikings of the North Pacific. Huge canoes, but they are also a great political force, very powerful environmental advocates. It was also the home of this botanically unique tree, this Golden Spruce. It was 165 feet tall, seven feet across at the base and had golden needles. Every tree from Mendocino to Anchorage, growing in that rainforest band has green needles. And there was one coming up out of that forest. You could see it from 20,000 feet in the air in a plane. There was one golden spire and it was that tree.”
Sitting at the MacLab Bistro at the Banff Center in Alberta Canada, Vaillant and I had the opportunity to talk about this incredible tree. The Golden Spruce is at the center of a film which appeared at the 2015 Banff Mountain Film Festival and sets the stage for a very complicated discussion on the importance of wildlife conservation and the sustainable management of public land. In the film Vaillant helps frame the story behind why this particular tree means so much to the Haida People and their forest home.


The story of the Golden Spruce begins in a village long since reclaimed by the shadows of the forest. It was a time of plenty, but the people were taking too much from the land. A long winter came. The village was decimated by hunger and only two people survived, a little boy and his grandfather. As they fled the village the man warned the boy not to look back. But the boy could not resist. As he turned back to take one last look his feet became rooted to the earth. The spirits transformed the boy into a tree in protest at the ways of the people. And there on the banks of Yakoun is the rare and beautiful tree with yellow needle that shine like gold in the sun.


“It was a unique quirk of nature,” Vaillant said. “The Golden Spruce did actually have a golden aura, a radiance that was derived from a genetic mutation of its needle’s coloring. But for the Hida, what really makes the Golden Spruce stand out is it is the only living being that connects back to that myth time.”
The Golden Spruce was sacred to the Haida People. It was a botanical mystery that was glorious to behold and as an economic driver to the region it was a much beloved tourist destination. Not unlike our own icon National Parks its location and the surrounding area were set aside to be protected and preserved. The Golden Spruce also stood as a living reminder to never again take so much from the land that we might put it at risk.

Tragically though on forest land nearby on Haida Gwaii and on public land throughout North America others trees were being cut down by the tens of thousands in industrial logging operations. Through the devastating practice of clear cutting these ancient for...]]>
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Jumbo Wild - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2015/jumbo-wild-an-interview-with-filmmaker-nick-waggoner/ Fri, 18 Dec 2015 15:18:53 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063513 http://joytripproject.com/2015/jumbo-wild-an-interview-with-filmmaker-nick-waggoner/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2015/jumbo-wild-an-interview-with-filmmaker-nick-waggoner/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i1.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web-pondella_c_0319_BP.jpg?fit=800%2C533" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>From the opening  frames of the latest film by Sweetgrass Productions the monumental scale of the subject fills the screen. In concert with vocals and orchestra the images swell with the music in pace with the magnitude of a very controversial issue and the mountain wilderness which surrounds it. Never one to shy from the […] From the opening  frames of the latest film by Sweetgrass Productions the monumental scale of the subject fills the screen. In concert with vocals and orchestra the images swell with the music in pace with the magnitude of a very controversial issue an... Sweetgrass Productions the monumental scale of the subject fills the screen. In concert with vocals and orchestra the images swell with the music in pace with the magnitude of a very controversial issue and the mountain wilderness which surrounds it. Never one to shy from the dramatic filmmaker Nick Waggoner sets the stage with meticulous care, like the conductor of a great opera. At the heart of this wonderful documentary is the age-old question: Do we develop the natural world for our own purposes, for commerce and recreation or do we keep it wild? This debate which rages in the halls of the Canadian parliament pits the interests of ski resort developers against the opposition of environmental activists and in the balance lies the fate of an ancient alpine ecosystem called Jumbo Mountain.
A significant departure from his usual role as a maker of big mountain ski films Waggoner is plying his cinematic skills to tell a different kind of story. Unlike the “ski porn” movies that feature gratutitous action sequences of steep downhill descents through deep powder snow, Jumbo Wild is a film with a mission. Hoping to raise the consciousness of viewers to recognize the importance of conserving the habitat of grizzly bear and the protecting of scared land of native people Waggoner uses own passion for backcountry skiing to illustrate the intricate details of a political fight that has endured through much of his lifetime.
Jumbo Wild offers up a candid view into the controversy that has divided this mountain community in the Canadian Rockies for more than two decades. After a screening at the 2015 Banff Mountain Film in Alberta Waggoner sat down with me at the MacLab Bistro at the famous Banff Centre to share a bit of the story behind this beautifully crafted documentary.

The film Jumbo Wild from Sweetgrass Productions is now available on iTunes and Vimeo on Demand. You can learn more about Jumbo Mountain and this continuing controversy online at sweetgrass-productions.com/jumbo-wild
Our theme music is by Jake Shimabukuro. The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks to fans like you on Patreon. For as little as a dollar month you can support this podcast and many adventure media initiatives covered here. For details visit patreon.com/joytripproject.
Thanks for listening, but as always I want to hear from you. So please write to me with your questions comments and criticisms to info@joytriproproject.com
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Cerro Torre ~ An interview with climber David Lama - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2014/cerro-torre-an-interview-with-climber-david-lama/ Tue, 04 Nov 2014 00:44:38 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2062714 http://joytripproject.com/2014/cerro-torre-an-interview-with-climber-david-lama/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2014/cerro-torre-an-interview-with-climber-david-lama/feed/ 1 In 2009 professional sport climber David Lama declared that he would summit the great mountain in Patagonia called Cerro Torre. Known around the world as one of the most difficult alpine ascents Lama proposed to make the climb up the 3128 meter spire via the infamous and highly controversial Compressor Route. But unlike those who […] In 2009 professional sport climber David Lama declared that he would summit the great mountain in Patagonia called Cerro Torre. Known around the world as one of the most difficult alpine ascents Lama proposed to make the climb up the 3128 meter spire v... David Lama declared that he would summit the great mountain in Patagonia called Cerro Torre. Known around the world as one of the most difficult alpine ascents Lama proposed to make the climb up the 3128 meter spire via the infamous and highly controversial Compressor Route. But unlike those who had successfully reached the top this young athlete then only 19 years old planed to climb using just the rock’s natural features and aided by bolts and ropes only for protection in case of a fall, a technique known as free climbing. But veteran Patagonia climbers like Jim Bridwell believed that free climbing Cerro Torre was impossible.
But undeterred by skeptics Lama would spend the next three years in pursuit of his goal. Having achieved a free climb ascent of the summit in 2012 his story is now the subject of a new film that premiered at the 2014 Banff Mountain Film Festival called Cerro Torre: A Snowball’s Chance in Hell.

Theme music by Jake Shimabukuro

This edition the Joy Trip Project was made possible thanks to the support of the Banff Mountain Film & Book Festival at the Banff Centre, inspiring creativity . You can support future episodes of this podcast through our crowd sourcing website at patreon.com For as little as a dollar a month, just 12 bucks a year you can keep the Joy Trip Project on the road. To find out how just visit patreon.com/joytripproject
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Peter McBride ~ photographing the most endangered river in America - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2014/peter-mcbride-photographing-the-most-endangered-river-in-america/ Fri, 14 Feb 2014 18:31:30 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=444368 http://joytripproject.com/2014/peter-mcbride-photographing-the-most-endangered-river-in-america/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2014/peter-mcbride-photographing-the-most-endangered-river-in-america/feed/ 0     Adventure photographers and filmmakers give us a unique view of the world. And throughout his long career taking pictures and telling stories for major magazines Peter McBride has offered up an exciting perspective, most often from the air. When he was in his 20s he flew a World War I biplane called the […]     Adventure photographers and filmmakers give us a unique view of the world. And throughout his long career taking pictures and telling stories for major magazines Peter McBride has offered up an exciting perspective, most often from the air.  
Adventure photographers and filmmakers give us a unique view of the world. And throughout his long career taking pictures and telling stories for major magazines Peter McBride has offered up an exciting perspective, most often from the air. When he was in his 20s he flew a World War I biplane called the Vickers Vimy from London to Cape Town to reenact the first time an airplane traveled across Africa in 1920.
“I think that really gave me an interest in the aerial perspective,” he said in an interview with the Joy Trip Project. “I was able to sell it to National Geographic with some good luck and that led me into a decade of doing work for Geographic and other magazines.”
Through his camera McBride has shown us images of the planet most of us can only dream of. Having chosen a profession suited to his nature he admits that his work fulfills a selfish desire.
“I guess I became a photographer more because I had an interest in seeing the world to be honest,” he said. “I love photography, but I love adventures. I love exploring and I love going into the unknown.”
McBride’s work in photography provides us with an eye-opening look at the planet. He gives his viewers and readers the opportunity to see the place they call home in a different way. From the high mountains of the Himalaya to the jungles of the Amazon McBride has made it possible for to people to see how they and others interact with their environment and to observe their role in the natural order of things. But it’s in his most recent body of work that McBride turns his lens back toward the place where HE grew up. Flying high above the Rocky Mountains to Sea of Cortez he has been following the course of the great North American river, The Colorado.
In a series of photo essays and feature films McBride now tells the story of the river that provides food and water for more than 10 percent of the U.S. population. The hardest working river in the world Colorado has flowed for more than 6 million years. But in the span of just a few decades its precious resources have been tapped to the breaking point.
Returning to his home in Colorado Peter McBride is raising awareness for the importance of conserving water in the west. Through his films and still photographs he illustrates the plight of the Colorado and demonstrates the impact of over development and the abuse of our most precious natural resource.
JTP:

So I think it’s fair to suggest that you have been involved in different types of photo capturing all over the world, specifically what is it that made you come back to the United States and put so much effort into telling the story of the Colorado River?
 
McBride:

I think I came home…I still travel a lot for work today, but I came home in part because I was a little burned out to be honest. I was telling someone just last night that I wanted to try to do something that had a little more impact than just a magazine article that somebody reads going to the bathroom or something. You know…And that’s not entirely fair. Magazine stories can chance things for sure, but I guess I just wanted to sink my teeth into something that was bigger, maybe bigger than me. And I didn’t have a really huge master plan. It sort of evolved on its…as it happened and it still is. But I came home and wanted to do something just around home and not travel a bunch. I was traveling all the time and so I had to hunker down and I came back to the valley where I grew up. My father’s a pilot and I started looking at doing some aerial work. And that led into the Colorado River project that technically took me two years. But I’ms till doing tributaries. I’m still doing rafting and I’m still talking about it. It’s an issue that’s definitely not going away and it’s going getting more and more severe.
JTP

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Wild, an interview with best selling author Cheryl Strayed - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2013/wild-an-interview-with-best-selling-author-cheryl-strayed/ Fri, 19 Apr 2013 12:15:17 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=51538 http://joytripproject.com/2013/wild-an-interview-with-best-selling-author-cheryl-strayed/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2013/wild-an-interview-with-best-selling-author-cheryl-strayed/feed/ 1 At the age of 26 best-selling author Cheryl Strayed strapped on a backpack and hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. Over the course of 94 days she traveled from Mojave California to the Bridge of the Gods in Cascade Locks Oregon, just outside of Portland where she lives today. Four years after loosing her mother who […] At the age of 26 best-selling author Cheryl Strayed strapped on a backpack and hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. Over the course of 94 days she traveled from Mojave California to the Bridge of the Gods in Cascade Locks Oregon,
At the age of 26 best-selling author Cheryl Strayed strapped on a backpack and hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. Over the course of 94 days she traveled from Mojave California to the Bridge of the Gods in Cascade Locks Oregon, just outside of Portland where she lives today. Four years after loosing her mother who died of cancer Strayed ventured  into the wilds of nature in order to find a part of herself she felt was missing. With absolutely now experience in backpacking she made the impulsive decision to deal with her unimaginable grief with an impossible adventure.
Strayed:

I was in such a place of desperation at that moment in my life that I needed something big. I needed a journey. I needed to go, to get myself to a different place. As I say in my book to gather myself, back to myself. And I knew that that wasn’t going to be a bunch of day hikes as I traveled and car camped. It needed to be a journey into the wild.
JTP:

While hiking the PCT Strayed encountered much of what you might expect on a long backpacking trip. But she’d find there was more in store for her than bug bits, blisters and sunburn. Along the miles of her journey she discovered the strength to endure the pain and suffering of loss while coming to the understanding that like the trail before her life goes on.

I’m James Mills and you’re listening to the Joy Trip Project.
Music by the Shanghai Restoration Project
JTP:

Cheryl Strayed was the key note speaker at the biannual breakfast meeting of the Conservation Alliance during the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market in Salt Lake City, Utah. I had the opportunity to talk to her about her book Wild and the circumstances that started her long journey after the sudden death of her mother.
Strayed:

I was really in a place of total despair. It’s sort of strange for me to really remember it now, because I’m 44. I’m happy. I have this really rich happy life. But at that time I really felt like I didn’t feel that I could go on. I had worked myself into such a place of sorrow over the grief of my mother. But then the things I did in that grief brought me further down. I made bad decisions. I was sexually promiscuous. I cheated on my husband who I loved. And that was really against my values. It was against the person I am. I’m not against promiscuity. I think it can have its moment in a life, but it was not the good thing for me to be doing it in that context. I was deceiving someone I loved. I was deceiving, really sort of violating a promise I made to someone I cared about. And then I got involved with drugs. Anyone who’s ever been under the influence knows, those things we reach for them because we think they’ll make us feel better and they always make us feel worse. When you reach for them in desperation they make you feel worse. And so those things were all effecting my state of mind too. And I got to the point where I thought, well you know why should I? Why should I go on living? Who would care if I disappeared? And I was feeling so much pain that it was the first time that I understood how it is that people would choose to end their lives. I wasn’t…I wouldn’t say I was honestly considering suicide. But I felt that kind of pain. Why  I go on?
JTP:

Is it fair to suggest that you might have gone into the wild in act of not necessarily of self destruction but in that moment in time to perhaps become r...]]>
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Urban Revitalization - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2013/urban-revitalization/ Thu, 31 Jan 2013 17:51:57 +0000 http://joytrip2012.mhwebstaging.com/?p=8577 http://joytripproject.com/2013/urban-revitalization/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2013/urban-revitalization/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i1.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/image3.jpg?fit=2048%2C1367" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>It goes without saying. Our world is growing bigger and more complicated everyday. Especially in our urban centers where economic and political fortunes are beginning to shift and reflect the values of a much more culturally diverse population. Despite the devastating effects failing banks and climate change there are rising many new opportunities to tap […] It goes without saying. Our world is growing bigger and more complicated everyday. Especially in our urban centers where economic and political fortunes are beginning to shift and reflect the values of a much more culturally diverse population. Majora Carter.
“An urban revitalization strategist, or me, is a person who identifies in particular low-income  communities and in our inner cities in the States, and looks around and sees what the problems are, what the failings are and figures out strategies to improve them both socially and environmentally as well as economically,” she said in this interview. “And you have to have all three involved, because it’s not just about putting band aids on these communities. It’s literally about increasing the quality of life, economically, socially as well as environmentally.”
Majora Carter was the keynote speaker at the biannual breakfast meeting of the Outdoor Industry Association during the 2013 Outdoor Retailer Winter Market in Salt Lake City Utah. Sharing her thoughts on strategies for urban revitalization she impressed upon those in attendance the importance of reaching out to under served communities, in particular people of color. Now that a majority of the worlds’ population lives in cities it is in these urban areas where we must now strive to achieve lasting change for the benefit of humanity. Working in the South Bronx borough of New York City, Carter is putting together solid plans to make this and other communities across the U.S. into vital centers of sustainable economic growth and development while helping to protect the environment. With the creation of both green jobs and green spaces in the heart of our biggest cities Carter hopes to encourage an ethos of conservation that will serve the interests of wilderness as well.
JTP:

The bulk of your work right now is in the South Bronx (New York), now work internationally but specifically what exactly have you done to revitalize that particular urban setting?
Carter:

Sure, we literally wanted to sort of flip the script on what was considered development in our community. So much of it was actually around noxious facilities and burdensome things of that nature, power plants, etc., and we wanted to change the landscape by creating more ecologically sound development. So it started with parks and greenways. And then we even went to people and started one of the country’s very first green-collar job and placement systems. Now we’re moving into real estate development because we understand that you can use real estate development as a platform for social, environmental and economic change, if it’s done correctly and strategically. It can be a transformation tool, which it has not been used that way before in poor communities.
JTP:

So what’s the disconnect? How is it that we even need to have someone like you tell us that the spaces that we occupy perhaps as residential areas or as businesses require some type of revitalization?
Carter:

The disconnect is that there are really low expectations placed on poor communities in general. And the people that are in them, and the elected that allegedly support them, the regulators who are supposed to regulating them, that kind of dynamic has been going on for generations to the point where I think even people who live there believe it.]]>
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The Road Not Taken an interview with Everest climber Hilaree O’Neill - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/roadnottaken/ Fri, 07 Dec 2012 14:00:30 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=8364 http://joytripproject.com/2012/roadnottaken/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/roadnottaken/feed/ 0   A professional ski mountaineer for more than 13 years climber Hilaree O’Neill started out her career at a very young age. Skiing since the age of three she spent most of her early days on the many 14,000-foot peaks near where she went to school in Colorado. “When I finished college I moved to […]   A professional ski mountaineer for more than 13 years climber Hilaree O’Neill started out her career at a very young age. Skiing since the age of three she spent most of her early days on the many 14,000-foot peaks near where she went to school in Co...  
A professional ski mountaineer for more than 13 years climber Hilaree O’Neill started out her career at a very young age. Skiing since the age of three she spent most of her early days on the many 14,000-foot peaks near where she went to school in Colorado.
“When I finished college I moved to Chamonix in France for about 5 years,” she said in an interview. “And that brought in sort of the more big mountain high altitude stuff with glaciers and ice climbing and all that kind of stuff. That kind of brought all the pieces together”
In 1999 she came to the attention of the North Face pro mountaineering team. Looking for elite female athlete to round out their roster TNF connected with O’Neill at the Outdoor Retailer Show in Salt Lake City, UT. With solid climbing skills and a resume packed with ascents both North America and Europe she was just who they were they looking for.
“And three weeks later I was on a plane to the India Himalaya,” she said So that was my first big expedition and from then on I was hooked!”
For more than a decade O’Neill has put in two to three trips to the Himalaya each year. And in the middle of very busy career she managed to find time to get married and give birth to two sons. As a wife and mother she’s still at the top of her game as world class mountaineer. Most recently in 2012, during one of the most challenging climbing seasons ever, O’Neill made a successful ascent of Mount Everest and then climbed to the top near by Lotse another 8,000 meter peak both on the same day. On tour with the North Face speakers series O’Neill visited Madison, WI to sit down and share her story a a presentation she calls the Road Not Taken.
O’Neill:

It was a huge learning curve going from the states the Chamonix was the first big learning curve of getting into skiing with ropes and harnesses and all that kind of stuff and then going from the Alps to Himalayas was a massive learning curve going from both culturally and myself personally in the sport because all of the sudden now it was becoming more about the climbing and less about the skiing and so really had to focus on those climbing skills more than the skiing for the first time in my life. It was also about sustaining mental toughness over three four five six week periods and being out and exposed for long periods of time. You know a lot of winter camping, a lot of storms. So it was a very steep learning curve. You know I think right after India I went to Russia and spent…got stuck in a storm and spent six days in a snow cave with a bunch of Russians. You know like where am I? So yes it was a steep learning curve.
JM:

So now what motivates you to do that kind of thing. You obviously had this great opportunity, but what made you stick with it?
O’Neill:

I just love the satisfaction I get from the adventure of it. Expeditions really are different in that you can plan to the best of your abilities and it never turns out the way you planned it. There’s always something new that you never expected, the climbing’s harder or easier or just different. And that’s the part of it I love. And I really like challenging myself. High altitude obviously is something that’s always been a major draw for me and I like the simplicity of it.
JM:

So now through the course of all that you also had an opportunity to fall in love and get married and started to raise a family. You’ve got a husband and a family and two small boys at home. I’ve heard you say in previous interviews that being a parent is infinitely more difficult or more challenging a mountaineer. Well I’ve got to know, what is it about parenting that making is so much difficult than being a climber?
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Elephant Engima - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/elephant-engima/ Sun, 23 Sep 2012 19:38:01 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=7958 http://joytripproject.com/2012/elephant-engima/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2012/elephant-engima/feed/ 1 Veterinarian and photographer Dag Goering is the co-founder with his wife author Maria Coffey in the adventure touring business Hidden Places Travel. For many years he’s worked at combining his love of travel with the care and protection of animals. “It all started with Camels really,” he said in an interview. “I was very interested […] Veterinarian and photographer Dag Goering is the co-founder with his wife author Maria Coffey in the adventure touring business Hidden Places Travel. For many years he’s worked at combining his love of travel with the care and protection of animals. Dag Goering is the co-founder with his wife author Maria Coffey in the adventure touring business Hidden Places Travel. For many years he’s worked at combining his love of travel with the care and protection of animals.
“It all started with Camels really,” he said in an interview. “I was very interested in doing longer journeys across the Sahara with the Tuaregs.”
The Tuaregs are a nomadic people who travel across the deserts of Northern Africa on caravans of camels. So Goering tried to find a way to come along.
“I thought as a veterinarian, that’s my background I could bone up on some camel medicine,” he said. “And that might make me useful.”
So he did some researched and someone suggested that he go to Bikaner in India, a desert region of Rajasthan. There he hoped to learn a few thing about camels. But he was surprised to discover that camels weren’t as popular as he thought.

“Everyone said, “well ‘Camels? Why are you interested in Camels? Camels are nasty animals.’” Goering said. “ And after working there for a couple of weeks in the clinic with camels I came to the conclusion they are indeed nasty animals.
Unfortunately, he didn’t learn very much. And disappointed but not discourage Goering decided to stay in India and travel. Along the way he wound up working with a non-profit organization that does volunteer veterinary medicine for camels dogs and other animals.
“And at one point we were called out to examine this newly born elephant,” he said. “So I was in the presence of all these magnificent large animals in these stables, elephant stables, and it was such a profound experience I just came home and said Maria I just want to work with elephants!”
Making the shift from camels to elephants Goering and his wife Maria Coffey began focusing their attention on the care and treatment of elephants. Through their non profit Elephant Earth Initiative to two work now to protect the habitats of elephants in the wild and their welfare among humans in captivity the couple raise awareness for the plight elephants both in Asia and in Africa
“There are huge issues to do with the welfare of captive elephants. One of the things that we bring across  in our presentation is how captive elephants are trained, are broken and then how they’re kept after that, the welfare issues about that. Most people just have no idea of the cruelty that’s inflicted upon captive elephants,” Coffey said. “ And then of course in the wild, like any mega-fauna they’re being hugely effected by population growth, by the loose of habitat, the growth of human elephant conflict. In many places around the world it’s becoming a very big issue. Elephants are very important to us and to world as a whole. Doug and I passionately believe that we have to do what we can to help preserve them.”
I had the pleasure of meeting Goering and Coffey during the 2011 Banff Mountain Film Festival in Alberta Canada. There they had on display an amazing assortment of elephant photographs that help to tell the story behind this magnificent but endangered animal in the presentation they call Elephant Enigma.

JTP:

In your presentation I heard you say that the eye of an elephant is like looking into orb into another world. And a lot of that imagery comes out in many of your photographs. What is it about the eye of an elephant that is so transformational?
Goering:

Well it is a bit difficult to describe. I think there is a strange energy, you know elephants don’t have expressive faces. They’re not like dogs. Dogs can sort of grimes or smile.]]>
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Wisconsin Life: Devil’s Lake Climbing - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/wisconsin-life-devils-lake-climbing/ Wed, 12 Sep 2012 14:04:59 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=7909 http://joytripproject.com/2012/wisconsin-life-devils-lake-climbing/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/wisconsin-life-devils-lake-climbing/feed/ 0 This summer, I traveled across the North American west, hitting  some of the top rock climbing destinations in the country. Moab, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite and Joshua Tree … plus a quick hike through the Grand Canyon.   I trained at mountaineering in the Chugach Range of Alaska and made it safely to the summit of […] This summer, I traveled across the North American west, hitting  some of the top rock climbing destinations in the country. Moab, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite and Joshua Tree … plus a quick hike through the Grand Canyon.
This summer, I traveled across the North American west, hitting  some of the top rock climbing destinations in the country. Moab, Utah, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite and Joshua Tree … plus a quick hike through the Grand Canyon.   I trained at mountaineering in the Chugach Range of Alaska and made it safely to the summit of Mount Baker in the Washington Cascades.  Next year I’ve got an even more ambitious project — to reach the top of Mount Denali, the highest point on the continent.    But there’s more to climbing than elevation, and some of the most challenging terrain I know is right here in Wisconsin. Devil’s Lake State Park, just 40 minutes north of Madison, is home to incredible high cliffs and stone walls that are perfect for rock climbing.
“People don’t realize that the southwest corner of Wisconsin had no glaciers. It’s called the driftless region,” Anne Hughes a friend avid local climber. “And so these valleys hills and cliffs have not been leveled out by glaciers and this particular rock that we’re climbing on is the center of an old mountain range.”
 
Anne is among the many climbing enthusiasts from Madison who regularly defy the misconception that Wisconsin is flat and featureless.
“These cliffs rise 500 feet off the surface of the lake,” she said. “That’s the center piece of the park called Devil’s Lake. So people who think of the Midwest as looking like central Illinois or or I-90 going across Ohio, you know haven’t been to a non-glaciated region.”
People have asked me if Devil’s Lake can offer much of a challenge to someone who’s climbed snow covered mountains in Colorado or vertical walls of granite 3,000 feet high.  Actually, it’s one of the most challenging terrains I know.  The rock here is relatively smooth with very little texture – which means there’s not a lot to hang onto.  It takes incredibly strong fingers and toes, and a whole lot of balance and dexterity.  It’s like the difference between ballet and football.  You need strength and stamina to play football.  You need a whole other level of skill if you want to dance on your toes for an hour.  That’s why people who learn to climb in Wisconsin climb well and go on to climb all over the world.
“I climb because I love being outside. I really enjoy the fact that it’s a three dimensional sport that every move is different, every climb is different,” Anne said. “Climbing the same climb is different every time. So I get strong all over my body. I like the partner relationship that is almost always involved, going out with a friend or more friends. You’re literally holding their lives in your hands, which is a sobering thought. It’s fun, but you’re really committed to each other. You’re watching each other’s back, making sure that she doesn’t do anything unsafe that she forgot about or just was preoccupied. And look at this environment! you’re outside everyday in this beautiful place doing something that makes your strong and healthy and fun.”
 
For Wisconsin Life, this is James Mills

Joy Trip Project contributions to National Public Radio programs like Wisconsin Life made possible in part with the support sponsors Patagonia, Rayovac and the New Belgium Brewing Company


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Paul Colangelo on the Sacred Headwaters - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/paul-colangello-on-the-sacred-headwaters/ Tue, 11 Sep 2012 18:44:04 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=7888 http://joytripproject.com/2012/paul-colangello-on-the-sacred-headwaters/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/paul-colangello-on-the-sacred-headwaters/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i2.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Sacred-Headwaters-mp3-image.jpg?fit=421%2C332" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>Typically political action can take shape only when the general populous is rallied and motivated to take a stand. When it comes to building awareness for issues of environmental protection it’s especially difficult because those regions most in need of protecting are usually far away from the public eye. That’s why an organization called the […] Typically political action can take shape only when the general populous is rallied and motivated to take a stand. When it comes to building awareness for issues of environmental protection it’s especially difficult because those regions most in need o... Typically political action can take shape only when the general populous is rallied and motivated to take a stand. When it comes to building awareness for issues of environmental protection it’s especially difficult because those regions most in need of protecting are usually far away from the public eye. That’s why an organization called the International League of Conservation Photographers goes out into some of the most remote habitats in the world to document the current condition of delicate ecosystems at  risk of destruction.
“I’ve been working in the Sacred Headwaters region since about 2009, now,” said ILCP photographer Paul Colangello. “And really briefly, the Sacred Headwaters is where three salmon bearing rivers all begin in one region of Northern British Columbia. So it’s the Stakeen, the Skeena and the Nass. It’s also home to one of the largest predator prey ecosystems in North America and it’s the traditional territory of the Tahltan first nation.”

Paul Colangelo is one of several members of the ILCP working to protect the Sacred Headwaters of British Columbia. This region is among the largest temperate rainforests in North America. But over the past few years it’s been flooded with proposed resource extraction projects. The biggest of which is Shell Oil’s million acre, coalbed methane tenure right in the heart of the headwaters. Others include an open pit gold and copper mine and a mountain top removal coal mine.

But the push back among the local population has been fierce. Approximately 1,500 members of the indigenous Tahltan nation have raised a lot of public awareness through blockades and sit-ins. They were actually able to stop Shell, the second largest corporation in the world.

“Well somewhat stop them,” Colangelo said. “They achieved a four year moratorium. But this will be lifted in december of 2012. And so we’ve been working in the area. That’s when the ILCP got involved too and produced a RAVE.”
A RAVE is a Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition. A team of world-class photographers like Colangelo along with videographers and journalists go into endangered regions such as the Sacred Headwaters and work to tell its story.
“We’re trying to bring the Sacred Headwaters to people, because it’s so remote,” Colangelo said. “Most people even living in British Columbia have never even heard about it. So we’re pretty much just trying to raise awareness. And we’re hoping to get people’s support for the protection of this area.”
Paul Colagello’s work along with eight other members of the ILCP culminated in a book written by National Geographic explorer Wade Davis called Sacred Headwaters Sacred Journey. I had a chance to talk to Colangello back in 2011 during the Banff Mountain Film Festival in Alberta Canada. There he shared the story behind his amazing photographs and the RAVE launched to protect this remote region at risk.
 
JTP:
Tell me a little bit about what a photographer does to help facilitate the preservation of these wild places.
Colangelo:

Well number one would be bringing places to people were they can’t see it. You can read about a spot, but you’re more likely to have a, you know a real connection and a reaction and waiting to save it if you actually see it. And then, I mean, after that, I mean, after you get to know and get,]]>
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127 Hours - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/127-hours/ Wed, 22 Aug 2012 18:56:20 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=7779 http://joytripproject.com/2012/127-hours/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/127-hours/feed/ 0   A conversation with Aron Ralston In 2003 Aron Ralston was brash young man looking for adventure. But while exploring the slot canyons of the Utah desert he found himself trapped miles from home deep within a underground chasm his right arm crushed and pinned by a massive boulder. There he lay stranded with no […]   A conversation with Aron Ralston In 2003 Aron Ralston was brash young man looking for adventure. But while exploring the slot canyons of the Utah desert he found himself trapped miles from home deep within a underground chasm his right arm crushed an... A conversation with Aron Ralston

In 2003 Aron Ralston was brash young man looking for adventure. But while exploring the slot canyons of the Utah desert he found himself trapped miles from home deep within a underground chasm his right arm crushed and pinned by a massive boulder. There he lay stranded with no hope of rescue for five days. Rolston’s story was portrayed in the 2010 film 127 Hours starting James Franko.
In order to escape from circumstance that would have meant certain death Ralston was forced to amputate his own arm. But he would go one to inspire millions through his incredible story of survival and perseverance through his bestselling book Between a Rock & a Hard Place. Ralstonwas the keynote speaker at the bi-annual meeting of the Conservation Alliance during 2012 Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Salt Lake City Utah. Immediately following his presentation I had the opportunity to ask him a few questions about his ordeal and what inspired him to live to tell his story.
JTP: Many people have seen the film and have read the book. The film is called 127 Hours. And the book is called Between a Rock and a Hard Place and it tells your story of a very harrowing experience in the Utah desert. I’ll leave it to other people to get an idea as to what it is that, that story meant to them, but perhaps you can give me an idea. In the film, how accurate was James Franko’s portrayal of your story? What did they get right? What did they get wrong?
Ralston: Well I worked with the film team for seven years as it was to take it all the way from when I wrote my book to turn it into a script and then selecting a director and working with them to choose James as they did to depict me and my experience. And even working with James then to coach him through the actions. He’s admittedly not an outdoorsman and to get him familiar with the desert, to get him an understanding of my experience. Not that he was trying to impersonate me so much, but to take an audience through my entrapment, the psychological aspects of the ordeal that I endured and then the liberation, the release, the triumph of it all too. And I thought it was very accurately portrayed, both from the overarching emotional stories, the themes that they highlighted about love and family and also the very physical and factual aspects of it too, all wrapped up in this extraordinary film adaptation of my experience. I think that people who watch it they know what I went through. You feel it really as you watch the film. So I was extremely pleased with what they did. I was that the point where I’m watching it with my sister a couple of times and as she’s seeing it for the first time she’s like elbowing me and slapping me on the knee saying , “That’s so you! They totally nailed it!” Even with my family they saw how genuine it was and to do that and at the same time really make a film that moves people? That’s not an easy thing.]]>
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SUP Wisconsin Life - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/sup-wisconsin-life/ Fri, 23 Mar 2012 15:32:11 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=7012 http://joytripproject.com/2012/sup-wisconsin-life/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/sup-wisconsin-life/feed/ 0 Recently I was asked to create at story about outdoor recreation for the Wisconsin Public Radio program ‘Wisconsin Life‘. With such unseasonably warm weather I managed to get my stand up paddle board out onto Madison’s lakes earlier  than ever before. So I went out on Lake Wingra with my digital recorder to gather sound […] Recently I was asked to create at story about outdoor recreation for the Wisconsin Public Radio program ‘Wisconsin Life‘. With such unseasonably warm weather I managed to get my stand up paddle board out onto Madison’s lakes earlier  than ever before. Wisconsin Life‘. With such unseasonably warm weather I managed to get my stand up paddle board out onto Madison’s lakes earlier  than ever before. So I went out on Lake Wingra with my digital recorder to gather sound and an experience to write a short essay. ~JEM
SUP Wisconsin
​Spring has come early to Wisconsin this year. It’s a warm day in March when I strap my Stand Up paddle board to the roof of my car and make the short drive to Madison’s Lake Wingra.
Winter’s ice has only just retreated and the clear open water ripples beneath bright sunshine. So early in the season the boat docks haven’t yet been put in place and I’m among the first to venture out.
​Eleven feet four inches long, my board eases in to the chilly water. Dressed  in neoprene booties, Lycra tights and a life jacket I hold the board steady with one foot, the other planted firmly on the wooden pier as I adjust the length of my paddle. I push away from shore with a gentle kick propelled just a little by a light breeze from the south.
​I’m a little out of practice after the winter, so it takes a few strokes of the paddle to find my center of balance on the board, to set my feet. Within minutes, though, I find that familiar rhythm as I sweep the blade through the water past the tall brown marsh grass and freeze-dried cattails along the shore. Standing tall above the water I can see swaying lake weeds beneath me and schools of blue gill that dart out before the rushing surge of my board.
​Faster now, the wind at my back, the lake’s current carries me toward the far shore. With a starboard turn I paddle along the beach front … locking breath and pulse to each stroke … building first then settling to a sustainable cadence.
Turning again into the wind I set a course straight in the direction of a distant tree. Matching each sweep of the paddle left side, right side and back again the blade balances the arch of travel to pull evenly through the water ever forward. Canadian Geese honk with encouragement as I go past and a family of ducks scatters, taking flight.
​With this lake all to myself I feel uniquely part of a great whole. Surrounded by water and wildlife, astride my board,  I too can fly like the birds . And as the sun slowly sets, I can see on the horizon many more great adventures on the lakes and rivers of Wisconsin.
 
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

 
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Visions of the Arctic - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/visions-of-the-arctic/ Fri, 10 Feb 2012 16:58:36 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6824 http://joytripproject.com/2012/visions-of-the-arctic/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/visions-of-the-arctic/feed/ 0 For most of his life wildlife photographer Florian Schulz has fought to protect the diversity of animals species around the world. Working in the most remote region of the planet he’s tracked and documented the wild birds of Mexico, big game animals of the African continent as well as the migratory patterns of caribou in […] For most of his life wildlife photographer Florian Schulz has fought to protect the diversity of animals species around the world. Working in the most remote region of the planet he’s tracked and documented the wild birds of Mexico,
For most of his life wildlife photographer Florian Schulz has fought to protect the diversity of animals species around the world. Working in the most remote region of the planet he’s tracked and documented the wild birds of Mexico, big game animals of the African continent as well as the migratory patterns of caribou in the Alaskan Arctic. And it’s in this frozen region known for its vast featureless landscapes where Florian has followed and photographed the great Polar Bears of the northern hemisphere.
Florian:
It’s really a land of extremes both in temperatures but also in the survival of animals in these harsh environments. And for me that is so intriguing, how the natural world is able cope and adapt to such extreme places. And I found it anything else but a barren wasteland.
With patient study after long months in the field Florian has come to a profound understanding of nature’s most delicate balance. By observing large animals musk ox, wolves, moose and grizzly bears he hopes to make those who see his photographs realize that all of these species have a direct relationship with each other, the land and in no small way the survival of humanity.
At the bi-annual breakfast meeting of the Conservation Alliance at the 2012 Outdoor Retailer Winter Market in Salt Lake City Utah Florian Schulz was the keynote speaker. Shortly after his presentation he shared with me how he first came to forge an intimate relationship with the harsh and forbidding environment of the Alaskan Arctic.
Florian:
I realized once I gave the land some time, once almost I got invited in I was starting to be able to see and document things that I would have never dreamt of seeing. But I have to be honest that you won’t go there and immediately just see everything. I mean it’s definitely important that you do spend the time and you don’t too big expectations because it’s a vast open place and wildlife sometimes is very dispersed.
JTP:
I think that’s actually one of the most compelling things about your work in that not unlike ice it takes a long time to develop. You have to slow it down. I’m interested in finding out how it is that you were able to slow yourself down enough to get a full appreciation for the minute changes that you wouldn’t necessarily see instantly just by being there. How did you find yourself even able to work in the solitude of that area?
Florian:
I think as a photographer you have it a little bit easier because if you are dreaming of exceptional images that kind of really occupies you. So if it’s a question of how do you get the patience? How do you go to a remote location year after year even though you haven’t been successful in finding the caribou for example? It is because you are envisioning these most spectacular images and that gives you so much excitement that you’re willing to go through the millions of mosquitoes, the freezing temperatures where you’re just really suffering. But that fascination with the images kind of let’s you endure all of that. But I don’t care enough about the suffering like that because you get rewarded with the view of an iceberg underneath the water or, you know, a view of thick bill murres diving as if they were penguins going down into the depths of the ocean. So yeah it’s rewarding. That’s why you can endure it.
JTP:
The work that you’re doing helped to establish a program called Freedom to Roam and the primary premise as I understand it is to create wildlife corridors through which animal species can successfully migrate for mating, for the gathering of food. How is it that you came to understand the necessity...]]>
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There is no alternative: an intererview with eco-economist Andrew Winston - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2012/there-is-no-alternative-an-intererview-with-eco-economist-andrew-winston/ Mon, 30 Jan 2012 15:05:03 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6747 http://joytripproject.com/2012/there-is-no-alternative-an-intererview-with-eco-economist-andrew-winston/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2012/there-is-no-alternative-an-intererview-with-eco-economist-andrew-winston/feed/ 0   For companies in the Outdoor Industry day-to-day operations that protect and preserve the environment naturally make good sense. So-called green business practices are meant to be sustainable, using a minimum amount energy and mostly renewable resources to create the products and services that drive our economy. And for Andrew Winston it’s become abundantly clear […]   For companies in the Outdoor Industry day-to-day operations that protect and preserve the environment naturally make good sense. So-called green business practices are meant to be sustainable, using a minimum amount energy and mostly renewable resour... For companies in the Outdoor Industry day-to-day operations that protect and preserve the environment naturally make good sense. So-called green business practices are meant to be sustainable, using a minimum amount energy and mostly renewable resources to create the products and services that drive our economy.
And for Andrew Winston it’s become abundantly clear that despite any political and social ideology that espouses the virtues of capitalism above all else green technology in commercial manufacturing and production is the best way to for businesses of every variety to assure their long-term profitability and prosperity. Having begun his career as a traditional business consultant Winston said he started taking a closer look into how business and the environment might work together.
Winston:
So I went back to school for an environmental management degree and decided that I wanted to marry business and the environment and figure out how to combine my business background and what was just an interest and passion about resource use, what the foundations of business really are, which is stuff and material and how we’re using too much of it. So it came from a place of practicality and profitability almost, even more than traditional quote tree hugging. That was just about business can’t survive like this. And that means our society can’t.
 
The author of two books Green to Gold and Green Recovery Andrew Winston was the keynote speaker at the biannual breakfast meeting of the Outdoor Industry Association at the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market in Salt Lake City Utah. There he shared with an audience of true believers his view on the importance of sustainability in business and why in the long run really there is no alternative.
 
JTP:
One of the things I find fascinating about your conversation is that you talk about issues, especially issues that you describe as “TINA Issues” And that stands for “There Is No alternative”. What are a few examples of these TINA issues? And what do they mean when it comes to reducing sustainability costs?
 
Winston:
Tina I’m really using in the broadest since. In dealing with climate change, dealing with biodiversity loss, dealing with waste,  there is no alternative. We don’t have a choice any more for a lot of reasons and the forces driving that include just increased resource cost and reduced resource availability as the number of people on the planet who are getting richer grows. There’s just not enough stuff. That’s sort of the obvious one. But there’s also transparency, the technology driven demand for knowing what’s in everything. And so this just opens up companies and they have to start talking about what they’re doing. And that means they actually have to start changing what they’re doing. You can’t be transparent about a process that they you don’t want to be a transparent about. So it means that you start changing products, what’s in it? Who made it? Where was it made? Were they paid a living wage? These things start being open to the world. So there is no choice. You can’t compete in a world where your customers, especially big business customers won’t put your products on the shelf if they don’t have the data, if they don’t know how it was made.
 
JTP:
And you refer to certain technologies that allow consumers to very quickly and...]]>
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The Canterbury Trail - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-canterbury-trail/ Sat, 31 Dec 2011 00:30:49 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6591 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-canterbury-trail/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-canterbury-trail/feed/ 0 When it comes to adventure writing the sharpest literary minds draw on the subject matter they know best. Author Angie Abdou brings to her latest book themes from an ancient English text first made popular in the middle ages. “I was a medievalist in a past life, which is a weird thing to be,” Angie […] When it comes to adventure writing the sharpest literary minds draw on the subject matter they know best. Author Angie Abdou brings to her latest book themes from an ancient English text first made popular in the middle ages. Angie Abdou brings to her latest book themes from an ancient English text first made popular in the middle ages.
“I was a medievalist in a past life, which is a weird thing to be,” Angie said at the Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival. “But before I took up fiction writing I taught medieval studies.”

You may remember from courses in English lit the classic travel stories known collectively as the Canterbury Tales. Written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century it’s a dark ages joy trip that follows the path of Christian pilgrims on their way from London to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral in Kent.
“And I think for people who haven’t read Chaucer they think it’s a classic text and that it must be serious and religious,” Angie said. “But Chaucer is a raunchy, bawdy, wild, wild text. And I always like the idea of how it might manifest, or turn into a contemporary novel, because he’s writing social satire of the whole breath of medieval society. And he uses the devise of a pilgrimage to bring together diverse groups that wouldn’t otherwise spend time together. So he has the fighters and prayers and workers and women and men and upper and lower, people who would normally never interact, but they’re together for the space of this pilgrimage. And so he’s able to satire the whole group. And so I thought where I live, what’s a pilgrimage? And it’s the back country ski-touring trek.”

Set in the fictional town of Coalton, somewhere in the Canadian Rockies Abdou tells in her book the many stories of mountain people. Drawn to a remote ski lodge by the last big snow dump of the year, these stereotypical nature lovers gather to offer up a bit of social satire on those who lead an active lifestyle.
“So you have the redneck snowmobiles and the pothead ski-bums and the snowshoeing hippies and they’re all…this developer guy who wants to cess out the territory and all the different groups from my town are headed back to the backcountry,” Angie said. “So I get to get them together and I put them in the same hut in the back country and see what happens!”
The tales are every bit as raunchy, bawdy and wild as anything Chaucer ever wrote. And in the classic style of the medieval poet Angie Abdou shares a comical story our own lives in adventure she calls The Canterbury Trail.
Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of our sponsor Patagonia. Discover their conservation and new media initiatives on their blog the Cleanestline.com. And special thanks to the Walton Works whose support underwrote travel expenses to Banff so I could bring back this and other great stories. Visit the Walton Works.com

 
Thanks for listening., But you know I want to hear from you. So please drop me a note with your questions, comments and criticisms to info@joytripproject.com.
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How to become a National Geographic Explorer - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/how-to-become-a-national-geographic-explorer/ Mon, 19 Dec 2011 06:00:00 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6532 http://joytripproject.com/2011/how-to-become-a-national-geographic-explorer/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/how-to-become-a-national-geographic-explorer/feed/ 0 If you’ve ever wondered how you might become an explorer for National Geographic believe it or not it can be as simple as attending a seminar. During the Banff Mountain Film Festival in a conference room at the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada aspiring young explorers learn the ropes of turning their dreams of adventure […] If you’ve ever wondered how you might become an explorer for National Geographic believe it or not it can be as simple as attending a seminar. During the Banff Mountain Film Festival in a conference room at the Banff Centre in Alberta, If you’ve ever wondered how you might become an explorer for National Geographic believe it or not it can be as simple as attending a seminar.
During the Banff Mountain Film Festival in a conference room at the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada aspiring young explorers learn the ropes of turning their dreams of adventure into an assignment for National Geographic. Their works may land on television, on the web or the famous magazine with the bright yellow border. Carrie Regan, Vice president of specials development at National Geographic Television tells young photographers, writers and filmmakers what she wants to see and hear in a pitch.
“In brief it’s basically looking for great adventures, adventures with great payoffs, a great discovery,” Regan said. “Think about what the hook would be, what would make viewers when they tune in for the first 5 minutes say, ‘Oh, my God! I have to stick around and see if they’re going to solve this mystery if they’re going to accomplish this quest’.”
 
For many, like those at this seminar, the dream of exploration began between the pages of National Geographic Magazine. Who can forget the image of early human ancestors discovered at Olduvai Gorge or the hunting eyes of the “Afghan girl” Sharbat Gula? Those vivid pictures and compelling stories have inspired people for generations to travel the world in search of adventure and scientific discovery. Since 1888 National Geographic has supported more than 10,000 expeditions to the most remote corners of the globe. And those gathered here want to be among the next group of explorers. In this seminar Regan encourages them to keep a few things in mind.
‘So really think about how this is going to be visually different,” she said “what great characters we have and what’s that great payoff that will keep viewers tuned in.”
 
Developing content across a variety of different media National Geographic is looking for new and exciting stories. Gregory McGruder, vice president of public programs at National Geographic also sits on the Expeditions counsel as well as the Young Explorers Grant counsel. He helps to pick from among the many projects that apply for support and funding. But he warns new applicants not to make up the social and culture significance the magazine is known for in their stories. He says just keep it real.
“We’ve got really good radar for things that are shoehorned in kind of improperly,” McGruder said. “If it’s something about adventure make it adventure. Don’t add the cultural element as a tag-on. I mean the cultural element is fine, but it just has to be authentic.”
It is this authenticity that adventure filmmaker and past National Geographic Younger Explorer Grant recipient Andy Maser brings to the magazine.
“I got a young explorer grant in 2009 for a project in Bolivia that blended climate change with white-water kayaking,” he said.
Maser’s project for National Geographic proposed to demonstrate through a paddling adventure how a warming planet might impact the availability of water in a major city like La Paz.
“A lot of their water comes from melting glaciers that are rapidly receding because of climate change,” Maser said. “So we launched an expedition to study these glaciers and then paddle the rivers that flow with the melt waters of these glaciers.”
Maser, who’s now 26, pitched his expedition idea to National Geographi...]]>
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‘Cold’ an interview with climber photographer Cory Richards - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/cold-an-interview-with-climber-photographer-cory-richards/ Mon, 05 Dec 2011 15:29:47 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6504 http://joytripproject.com/2011/cold-an-interview-with-climber-photographer-cory-richards/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/cold-an-interview-with-climber-photographer-cory-richards/feed/ 1 Making the rounds at mountain film festivals all over the world is a new movie by Anson Fogel and Cory Richards. In the classic style of adventure storytelling Richards shares his tale of three climbers in his award-winning film ‘Cold’. “It’s a very raw real look into what’s kind of going on inside my head […] Making the rounds at mountain film festivals all over the world is a new movie by Anson Fogel and Cory Richards. In the classic style of adventure storytelling Richards shares his tale of three climbers in his award-winning film ‘Cold’. Making the rounds at mountain film festivals all over the world is a new movie by Anson Fogel and Cory Richards. In the classic style of adventure storytelling Richards shares his tale of three climbers in his award-winning film ‘Cold’.

“It’s a very raw real look into what’s kind of going on inside my head as I did a climb with Simone Moro and Denis Urubko last winter on a peak called Gasherbrum II,” Richards said in an interview.
Ascending one of the highest peaks in the world at temperature 50 degrees below zero as the film opens Richards can’t help but ask himself a quintessential question.
 
“What the f#@%! am I doing here? We have to get down,” he says in the film.
 
Gasherbrum II stands more than 8,000 feet above sea level.
 
“For you guys who aren’t good at math that’s above 26, 240 feet. There’s 14 of them in the world. Obviously Everest is the highest,” Richards said. “And 9 of those peaks are in Nepal and Tibet. And 5 are in Pakistan. And for the past 26 years since the Polish advent of winter 8,000 meter climbing all of the peaks in Nepal and Tibet had been climbed in winter, but none of the Pakistani 8,000-meter peaks had been successfully climbed in winter.”
 
Going after this Pakistani summit through a Himalayan winter in the tradition of the great Polish climbers of the last century Richards and his team Italian climber Simone Moro and Denis Urubko of Kazakhstan attempted to do what no one had done before.
 
“So when we did it on February 2nd 2011 it was actually a monumental achievement. And it’s funny for me to say that because I don’t necessarily look at it in that way. That’s not something that I think. But that’s how it’s viewed,” Richards said. “ ‘Cold’ is basically a representation of what I think goes on in everybody’s head when they’re climbing. They think about their family. They think about their life. They think about the doubts they have. And hopefully it’s just a real perspective, verses a chest pounding triumphant heroic film. It’s not meant to be that.”
 
At the 2011 Banff Mountain Film Festival ‘Cold’ took the grand prize. Climber, photographer and filmmaker Cory Richards also took a few minutes to tell me about his life now making movies on the highest mountains in the world.
 
 
JTP:
What’s really fascinating is that you actually did all the photography yourself with a handheld camera throughout the entire expedition. At high altitude that’s a lot to take on in addition to actually doing the climb. What was it like to be able to be responsible for both climbing and surviving on Gasherbraum II and taking pictures?
 
Cory:
You know it’s funny a lot of people talk about just that fact, that…”what’s it like to film up there?” And for me, coming from a photography background, coming from a film background, I don’t actually think of it like that because that’s just why I get invited to go on these trips because that’s my job. So I think it’s an added aspect, but it’s something that’s sort of hard for me to describe because it’s not a tangible thought process any more. This is what I’m doing here. This is what I have to do. So I’m doing it.
 
JTP:
At the same time though you also have to have the presence of mind to set the shot, to be able to while Simone is puking on the summit you’re there holding the camera.
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Freedom Climbers - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/freedom-climbers/ Fri, 18 Nov 2011 06:01:32 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6408 http://joytripproject.com/2011/freedom-climbers/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/freedom-climbers/feed/ 0   Writer and former director of the Banff Mountain Film Festival Bernadette McDonald has new book that offers a unique perspective on high altitude climbing in the Himalaya. As the author of several titles on the subject she’s well regarded in the international mountaineering community. And back in 2003 she came up with an idea […]   Writer and former director of the Banff Mountain Film Festival Bernadette McDonald has new book that offers a unique perspective on high altitude climbing in the Himalaya. As the author of several titles on the subject she’s well regarded in the inte... Writer and former director of the Banff Mountain Film Festival Bernadette McDonald has new book that offers a unique perspective on high altitude climbing in the Himalaya. As the author of several titles on the subject she’s well regarded in the international mountaineering community. And back in 2003 she came up with an idea for this latest project at an adventure film festival in Poland.

“And as most ideas do, this one began at a party,” McDonald said.
 
It was the after party of this festival and McDonald was in the clubhouse of the Katowice Mountain Club. She knew a number of these climbers from her years working at the festival. But in this particular situation she was sort of swamped with them, she said. There were dozens of climbers in this clubhouse and there was a lot of energy in the room.
 
“But it wasn’t just about the festival. It was about a community of the hardest core climbers I had ever seen in my life,” McDonald said. “And the stories that I heard that night, the passion and the depth of their history in the mountains absolutely astonished me. But the other thing that struck me was that it felt like it was the end of an era because a lot of the best of those climbers had already died in the mountains. It felt a bit like an Irish wake. That’s the way it struck me and I thought there was a story here. Because the situation in which they grew up, the conditions, the hardships that they endured were so different than anything that I had ever experienced and more different than most people I knew had experienced. And I somehow felt that those two things were linked.”
 
From the mid1970s through the 1980s Polish climbers dominated the Himalayan mountaineering scene. This generation of adventurers rose up from the horrific occupation by Nazi Germany during World War II only to be subjugated afterward by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. For thousands of young people at that time the mountains were their only escape and many of them ventured far away from Poland into the high of places of Central Asia where they distinguished themselves among the best alpinists in the world. In her book Freedom Climbers Bernadette McDonald tells their story.
Music this week by guitarist Alex Chudnovsky and singer songwriter Cheryl B. Englehart


 
The Joy Trip Project Adventure Media Review is made possible with the support of sponsors Patagonia and The Walton Works


 
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The Descent - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-descent/ Mon, 10 Oct 2011 20:55:35 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6172 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-descent/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-descent/feed/ 0 On NPR’s All Things Considered veteran public radio reporter Alex Chadwick tells an intimate story of environmental activist Tim DeChristopher. Before he was sentenced to two years in federal prison for an act of civil disobedience DeChristopher and Chadwick spent several days together on a whitewater rafting trip. Chadwick: Every time you write a piece […] On NPR’s All Things Considered veteran public radio reporter Alex Chadwick tells an intimate story of environmental activist Tim DeChristopher. Before he was sentenced to two years in federal prison for an act of civil disobedience DeChristopher and Ch... On NPR’s All Things Considered veteran public radio reporter Alex Chadwick tells an intimate story of environmental activist Tim DeChristopher. Before he was sentenced to two years in federal prison for an act of civil disobedience DeChristopher and Chadwick spent several days together on a whitewater rafting trip.
Chadwick: Every time you write a piece you have to kind of figure out what the piece is about what the story’s about. I actually finished this piece before I really understood what it’s about. It’s about two guys in trouble who go done a river.
DeChristopher had been convicted of disrupting a Bureau of Land Management auction of oil and gas drilling leases on property adjacent to two national parks in the state of Utah.
Chadwick: So he was waiting to be sentenced and I was going through struggles of my own that had to do with the loss of my wife and I my just feeling lost and kind of uncertain about really everything. And the two of us go down this river together and just have an experience and adventure.
Chadwick had recently lost his wife National Public Radio producer Carolyn Chadwick. And on the invitation of river guide and activist John Weisheit he and DeChristopher made a long journey down the Colorado River through the rapids of Cataract Canyon. In the time that hey spent together two men shared their stories in a piece for radio called the Descent. On this trip DeChristopher ponders the sacrifices we he made, everything he’s given up to protect the environment.
DeChristopher:
And I started to accept that in a lot of ways I have nothing to loose by fighting back because I’ve already grieved the loss of everything that can be taken away from me.
Chadwick:
Everything. Carolyn loved being outside. She loved the rivers, the west the way the night ski here makes star galleries. We were coming some day. We were coming to the river and she wouldn’t be scared. She was afraid of her end sometimes. But she almost never showed it. She didn’t want to talk about it. I’m on this journey because of her. John Weisheit knows what I lost and he thinks the river is transformative, healing maybe. I’m carrying a recorder and making notes and talking with time out of habit, or maybe to learn that I still can.
Clearly Chadwick hasn’t lost his touch. And in the Descent he paints a picture of DeChristopher that provides an alternative view of the calm serious activist so willing to lay down his freedom.
 
Chadwick:
I saw on the river a different side of him a lightness a sense of fun and pleasure and laughter that’s absent from his life in Salt Lake City as an activist. He had a good time on the river. He had a really good time as did I.

You can listen to Chadwick’s piece the descent on the KCRW public radio program Unficitional, with a revised version also available at the NPR show All Things Considered.
Music by Max Carmichael

The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia


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Coffee Story Ethiopia - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/coffee-story-ethiopia/ Fri, 07 Oct 2011 20:06:57 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6110 http://joytripproject.com/2011/coffee-story-ethiopia/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/coffee-story-ethiopia/feed/ 0 An interview with climber and writer Majka Burhardt Many Americans -maybe even most of us- begin our mornings with a steaming cup of coffee. That wonderfully dark warm beverage helps to kick start your day and put a little bounce in your step. But if you’re like me, you probably haven’t put a whole lot […] An interview with climber and writer Majka Burhardt Many Americans -maybe even most of us- begin our mornings with a steaming cup of coffee. That wonderfully dark warm beverage helps to kick start your day and put a little bounce in your step.
Many Americans -maybe even most of us- begin our mornings with a steaming cup of coffee. That wonderfully dark warm beverage helps to kick start your day and put a little bounce in your step. But if you’re like me, you probably haven’t put a whole lot of thought into where it comes from or how it’s grown. That’s why writer and climber Majka Burhardt traveled more than 8,000 miles to discover the story.

“I went to Ethiopia originally as a journalist to try to find a rare coffee,” she said. “That coffee receives about $150 a pound on the U.S. market and we tried to find the genetic roots of it in Ethiopia. We didn’t find the coffee. But I wound up staying there and climbing and writing a book called Vertical Ethiopia about doing first ascents — and really, a book about how to use rock climbing to tell a different story about Ethiopia that was not only about drought, poverty, and famine.”
Majka and I first met as we discussed her early journeys through eastern Africa. Her book Vertical Ethiopia details her adventures while climbing some of the very first routes on the cliffs of Gheralta in a region called Tigray. And during her travels while climbing she discovered that in addition to its rich and complex flavors, coffee also offers a deep look to the history of Ethiopia and its people. “Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee. It’s the home of 10,000 varietals of coffee,” Majka said. “So for me to come back and tell the stories behind coffee, that was just the ultimate expression of what is Ethiopia. In some ways you can tell the story of Ethiopia through coffee.”
I had the pleasure of traveling through Africa with Majka as she was finishing up the last few chapters of her latest book. And as we reconnected during the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Salt Lake City Utah we had a chance to talk about what she learned and to share her new book Coffee Story Ethiopia.
Music this week by Cheryl B. Englehardt
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of our sponsor Patagonia

Check out their latest new media and conservation initiatives at their blog thecleanestline.com
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The Ledge - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ledge/ Fri, 30 Sep 2011 21:19:54 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6058 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ledge/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ledge/feed/ 2 An interview with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson As an adventure journalist I have the opportunity to meet some amazing people. And it was through the magic of social media that I became friends with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson. We first got acquainted on Facebook. But last year we met […] An interview with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson As an adventure journalist I have the opportunity to meet some amazing people. And it was through the magic of social media that I became friends with climber,
As an adventure journalist I have the opportunity to meet some amazing people. And it was through the magic of social media that I became friends with climber, writer and public speaker Jim Davidson. We first got acquainted on Facebook. But last year we met in person at a café in the Canadian Rockies, a town called Banff. There he told his incredible story of friendship, adventure and survival that’s the subject of his new book, “The Ledge”. On a routine decent of Mt. Rainier Jim and his climbing partner Mike Price suddenly fell and were trapped in a deep crevasse.
“After a few more distant impacts, there is silence and darkness beneath this cocoon of snow,” Jim writes in his book. “I wonder whether it’s quiet now because the snow has ceased falling or because I am buried so deep that I can no longer hear what’s happening on top of the thick snowpack. The silence terrifies me.
I open my eyes -at least I  think I do- but blackness envelops me. To make sure they’re actually open, I blink a few times and feel sharp snow grains scratch my eyelids. I see nothing.
I’m buried alive.”
Jim’s partner Mike died in the fall. And it was only after several hours of painstaking effort that Jim was able, all alone, to climb his way to safety. Despite the tragic circumstances of his story as detailed in his book  Jim finds great comfort in the lessons he’s learned through the power of persistence, determination and the bonds of friendship. Ironically these are life-long skills that Jim picked up as a young a man not as a climber, but doing dangerous work with his father as a high altitude painter of tall buildings towers and bridges.
The Ledge: an adventure story of friendship and survival on Mount
Rainier by Jim Davidson and Kevin Vaughan is available in hardcover and published by Ballantine Books. You can learn more online at Jim’s web site Speaking of Adventure.
Music by Jake Shimabukuro
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

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Ron Kauk, a climber’s journey - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/ron-kauk-a-climbers-journey/ Fri, 23 Sep 2011 21:36:48 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=6014 http://joytripproject.com/2011/ron-kauk-a-climbers-journey/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/ron-kauk-a-climbers-journey/feed/ 2 Ron Kauk is one of the best known climbers in Yosemite Valley. He was among that early generation of big wall pioneers that set the standards and established the major routes that are still popular today. Since 1974 he’s been a regular in the Yosemite climbing community. Having made the first free ascent of Washington […] Ron Kauk is one of the best known climbers in Yosemite Valley. He was among that early generation of big wall pioneers that set the standards and established the major routes that are still popular today. Since 1974 he’s been a regular in the Yosemite ...
Ron Kauk is one of the best known climbers in Yosemite Valley. He was among that early generation of big wall pioneers that set the standards and established the major routes that are still popular today. Since 1974 he’s been a regular in the Yosemite climbing community. Having made the first free ascent of Washington Column in 1975 with John Long and John Bachar Kauk renamed the route Astroman and it became the most challenging climb in the Valley for more than 10 years.
On a joy trip out to the west coast this summer I had the chance to meet Kauk and talk to him about his younger days in Yosemite.
“For me it was like entering this incredible world of granite and rivers and trees and this interesting like-minded group of people in this place we’re sitting in which is camp four,” Kauk said. “It was colorful and energized with this enthusiasm to climb but also live simply. To think that you could walk in and feel so comfortable and belong to this group and inspire each other just out here on these boulders … or out there on those big walls once you learned the fundamentals.”
It’s been more than 30 years and Kauk is still climbing in Yosemite. With a life philosophy that includes a deep and abiding appreciation for nature he continues to inspire young people through a non-profit called Sacred Rok. Making the connection between spirituality and the preservation of wild places he’s taking the sport of rock climbing to a whole new level.
 
Music this week by Eric Garcia & Jake Shimabukuro 
 
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Dean Karnazes - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/dean-karnazes/ Wed, 14 Sep 2011 09:54:26 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5983 http://joytripproject.com/2011/dean-karnazes/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/dean-karnazes/feed/ 0 An interview with the inspirational ultra-marathon runner of the Endurance 50 Back in 2006 ultra distance runner Dean Karnazes performed an amazing stunt. Over the course of 50 days he ran 50 marathons in each of the 50 United States. An inspiring feat to be sure, running 26.2 mile every day and then traveling quickly […] An interview with the inspirational ultra-marathon runner of the Endurance 50 Back in 2006 ultra distance runner Dean Karnazes performed an amazing stunt. Over the course of 50 days he ran 50 marathons in each of the 50 United States. Endurance 50

Back in 2006 ultra distance runner Dean Karnazes performed an amazing stunt. Over the course of 50 days he ran 50 marathons in each of the 50 United States. An inspiring feat to be sure, running 26.2 mile every day and then traveling quickly by car to the next state and do it again.  But what was especially interesting to Dean and me too with I spoke to him were the stories of the many people he met along away.
 
Dean Karnazes is touring the country as part of The North Face Speakers Series. And in anticipation of an upcoming visit here to Madison, WI I’m treating you this week to a Joy Trip flashback from an interview I recorded with Dean in 2007. You’ll be surprised how some who inspires so many can be inspired by others.
 
You can learn about Dean Karnazes and his career in running online just visit the athletes page at the North Face.com
Music by the band Hot Buttered Rum
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The Raven’s Gift - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ravens-gift/ Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:50:43 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5871 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ravens-gift/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-ravens-gift/feed/ 0 An interview with writer and explorer Jon Turk Many of us put a lot on the line for the sake of adventure. And for writer and scientist Jon Turk the decision to paddle a kayak across the Pacific Ocean from Asia to North American was in keeping with a tradition of discovery as old as […] An interview with writer and explorer Jon Turk Many of us put a lot on the line for the sake of adventure. And for writer and scientist Jon Turk the decision to paddle a kayak across the Pacific Ocean from Asia to North American was in keeping with a t...
Many of us put a lot on the line for the sake of adventure. And for writer and scientist Jon Turk the decision to paddle a kayak across the Pacific Ocean from Asia to North American was in keeping with a tradition of discovery as old as humanity itself.
“You look for an audacious and bold plan that’s still feasible,” Turk said. “You look to be vulnerable and at the same time secure. And at that time, which was about 10 years ago now nobody had successfully crossed the Pacific Ocean in a standard production off the shelf-kayak.”
 
Turk had a dream to paddle more than 3,000 miles across a vast ocean. But he would later realize that he was actually tracing a migratory route he believes was followed by ancient humans thousands of years ago. And it kind of makes you wonder why anyone today or way back when would ever to do such a thing.
 
“We all agree that migration is difficult,” Turk said. “It’s difficult to get into a canoe, to leave your homeland with deer in the forest, seals in the bay, with salmon in the streams and paddle three thousand miles across the arctic in the middle of the ice ages.”
If it’s so difficult again the question then as it is today is why? The anthropologist will tell you that because we are a pragmatic people the only reason why we would do something that difficult, paddle 3,000 miles across the ocean, is if we are force out of our homeland by warfare or starvation or lured into more productive hunting grounds by a more productive place. In other words it was beaten up, famished people who had just lost a war escaping for their lives. But Jon Turk doesn’t believe that.

“I don’t believe that on two grounds,” he said. “First of all it’s such a hard trip that if you started out beaten up weakened, famished loosing most of your warriors in a battle you’re going to die. Second of all I think the hardest and most audacious journeys are following dreams, not pragmatic reasons. Pragmatism will get you so far. But the dream will get you farther.”
 
So following his dream Jon Turk ventured out across the ocean and along the way he discovered a few interesting ideas about the very nature of adventure. And his book, The Raven’s Gift he explores the power of risk and vulnerability as a way for travelers to experience magic.
The Raven’s Gift is published by St. Martins Press
 
 
Music this week by Chad Farran
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of our sponsor Patagonia

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Shelton Johnson speaks to the Conservation Alliance - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/shelton-johnson-address-to-the-conservation-alliance/ Wed, 10 Aug 2011 12:46:45 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5725 http://joytripproject.com/2011/shelton-johnson-address-to-the-conservation-alliance/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/shelton-johnson-address-to-the-conservation-alliance/feed/ 2 For those of us who spend a great deal of time outdoors it’s hard to believe that there are many of those who don’t. Especially when it comes to our national parks there is an entire segment of the United States population, natural born citizens who seldom if ever visit. This is particularly true among […] For those of us who spend a great deal of time outdoors it’s hard to believe that there are many of those who don’t. Especially when it comes to our national parks there is an entire segment of the United States population,
For those of us who spend a great deal of time outdoors it’s hard to believe that there are many of those who don’t. Especially when it comes to our national parks there is an entire segment of the United States population, natural born citizens who seldom if ever visit. This is particularly true among people of color. African-Americans, Hispanics and other ethnic minorities spend far less time in nature than their white counterparts. And in a shifting demographic where minorities will soon become the majority there’s rising concern throughout the conservation movement that one day in the not so distant future most U.S. citizens will have no personal relationship with or affinity for the natural world.
This concern is expressed most eloquently by National Park Ranger Shelton Johnson. The only permanent African-American ranger at Yosemite National Park his mission is to share with audiences, black and white, lessons of stewardship that illustrate the bond with nature that is every U.S. citizen’s birth rite. An interpretive ranger that tells the story of the Buffalo Soldiers, African-American cavalrymen who projected Yosemite at the turn of last century, Johnson puts into context the importance of wilderness not merely as a point of national pride but an intrinsic value of what it mean to be human.
At the biannual meeting of the Conservation Alliance at the 2011 Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Salt Lake City Utah, Shelton Johnson was the keynote speaker. Best known for his prominent role in the Ken Burns documentary “The National Parks, America’s Best Idea,” he was also instrumental in bringing Yosemite Valley to the attention of leading black talk show host Oprah Winfrey. In a nationally televised visit to the park in 2010 Winfrey used her media clout to invite millions of minorities across the country to explore the great outdoors.
In this unabridged audio recording Johnson is welcomed to the podium by Conservation Alliance executive director John Sterling. For 40 minutes Ranger Johnson inspired a rapt crowd with a message to encourage all people, regardless of race, to embrace the wonders of nature and to claim their inheritance of our national treasures
 Music this week by the band Hot Buttered Rum

The Joy Trip Project is brought with the support of our sponsor Patagonia.
 
Coverage of the 2011 Outdoor Retailer Summer Market was supported by Knupp, Watson & Wallman

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Alex Honnold the reluctant free-soloist - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/alex-honnold-the-reluctant-free-soloist/ Sun, 17 Jul 2011 23:01:19 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5492 http://joytripproject.com/2011/alex-honnold-the-reluctant-free-soloist/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/alex-honnold-the-reluctant-free-soloist/feed/ 0 <p style="float: right; margin: 0 0 10px 15px; width:240px; height: auto;"> <img src="https://i1.wp.com/joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/AlexHonnold211.jpg?fit=553%2C347" width="240" style="max-width: 100%; height: auto;" /> </p>  Many of us have a deep fascination with rock climbers. Big wall climbers in particular captivate our wonder and attention as we marvel that their daring feats of courage. And in the movie Alone on the Wall from Sender Films fans are introduced to a new breed of climber and the most breathtaking alpine […]   Many of us have a deep fascination with rock climbers. Big wall climbers in particular captivate our wonder and attention as we marvel that their daring feats of courage. And in the movie Alone on the Wall from Sender Films fans are introduced to a n... Many of us have a deep fascination with rock climbers. Big wall climbers in particular captivate our wonder and attention as we marvel that their daring feats of courage. And in the movie Alone on the Wall from Sender Films fans are introduced to a new breed of climber and the most breathtaking alpine style of all.
Alex Honnold is one of those guys who has distinguished himself as a climber doing amazing things. Climbing the Yosemite big wall of Half Dome without a rope is what he’s best known for but he says there’s more to him than that.
“I hate to be defined as a free soloist,” he said. “I spend like 99 percent of my time climbing with a rope, climbing with climbing with my friends. So it’s kind of annoying to be pegged as THE free-soloist, because that’s just a small part of what I do.”
 
At the 2010 Banff Mountain Film Festival I had the chance to talk to Alex about his life in climbing and what makes this reluctant free-soloist tick.

You check out Alex Honnold and his life in climbing the movie Alone on The Wall part of the First Ascent  series now DVD at Sender Films.com.
Music this week by Chad Farran
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

 
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Happy ~ a new film by Roko Belic - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-happy-a-new-film-by-roko-belic/ Sat, 09 Jul 2011 03:21:15 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5456 http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-happy-a-new-film-by-roko-belic/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-happy-a-new-film-by-roko-belic/feed/ 1   If you haven’t figured it out yet, a big part of this program is trying to figure out what makes people happy. Personally I believe happiness isn’t just something that happens. I think we all try to create things in our lives that bring us joy. But as Benjamin Frankly once said The Constitution […]   If you haven’t figured it out yet, a big part of this program is trying to figure out what makes people happy. Personally I believe happiness isn’t just something that happens. I think we all try to create things in our lives that bring us joy. If you haven’t figured it out yet, a big part of this program is trying to figure out what makes people happy. Personally I believe happiness isn’t just something that happens. I think we all try to create things in our lives that bring us joy. But as Benjamin Frankly once said The Constitution guarantees all Americans the right to pursue happiness but it’s up to each of us catch it. I learned that quote from my friend Los Angeles filmmaker Roko Belic. At the 2011 Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado he shared with me his latest project a movie he calls Happy.


 
“The way that I got into making Happy is very simple,” Belic said. “A friend of mine named Tom Shadyack called me and said that he had read an article in the New York Times that compares countries in terms of happiness. And this article said that although America is one of the richest countries it’s nowhere near the happiest. And Tom said ‘you know this is something I’ve been thinking about because I live in Hollywood and I’m surrounded by very successful wealthy, talented people who’ve essentially achieved an exaggerated version of the American dream and yet many of them are not happy. So we should get to the bottom of this and explore happiness in a documentary film.’
And I said Absolutely. Sounds amazing!”
So Belic spent more than four years traveling the world to explore many different cultures and communities. Along the way asked several leading experts in the science of human behavior exactly what it means to happy. And through the making of this film he discovered for himself and those of us in the audience a few simple answers to one of life’s most complicated questions.

The film Happy by Roko Belic isnow  in festival and special screening distribution. For more information visit www.thehappymovie.com.
Music this week by Jake Shimabukur

The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

 
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With My Own Two Wheels - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-with-my-own-two-wheels/ Sat, 25 Jun 2011 12:34:27 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5406 http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-with-my-own-two-wheels/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/adventure-media-with-my-own-two-wheels/feed/ 0 The transformational power of bicycles is the subject of a new film by brothers Jacob & Isaac Seigel-Boettner. “With My Own Two Wheels” takes us on a ride through the developing world to see how these simple mechanical devices are changing peoples’ lives. Though here in the U.S. we take for granted the ease of […] The transformational power of bicycles is the subject of a new film by brothers Jacob & Isaac Seigel-Boettner. “With My Own Two Wheels” takes us on a ride through the developing world to see how these simple mechanical devices are changing peoples’ liv... The transformational power of bicycles is the subject of a new film by brothers Jacob & Isaac Seigel-Boettner. “With My Own Two Wheels” takes us on a ride through the developing world to see how these simple mechanical devices are changing peoples’ lives. Though here in the U.S. we take for granted the ease of going from place to place by car, the filmmakers demonstrate that bicycles offer for many living in poverty a way out.
Co-director Jacob Seigel-Boettner said his project was an opportunity to connect with real people around the world with real stories about their bikes.
“We were incredibly lucky to find all of these not only great characters,” he said “but people who were willing to let us follow them around with a camera wherever and however long we wanted to.”
With a recent showing at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride and now in private screening distribution, the 44-minute film depicts the stories of five individuals, each with a different spin on how bikes empower them.

[vimeo]16567383[/vimeo]
“We started with World Bicycle Relief,” said Jacob Seigel-Boettner . “With work I had done in the bike industry, I knew they were not only the largest but the most sustainable bike development organization in terms of distributing bikes, and training mechanics and making sure that it was done right.”
So the directors built a story around five people for whom bicycles made a big difference. Fred is a caregiver from Zambia who rides from village to village visiting aids patients. Carlos is the inventor of pedal-powered device called the bicimaniquina that offers a small-scale industrial alternative to diesel-fueled machines. Sharkey in Santa Barbara California avoids life in gangs working in a neighborhood bike shop called Bici Centro. In India a young girl named Bharati gets an education thanks to a local program called Ashta No Kai that provides bicycles for her and her friends to ride to school. And Mirriam is a polio-stricken bike mechanic in Ghana.
“I know that her life is changed by it. I know that she now sees herself in the world as an influential person,” said David Branigan of Bikes Not Bombs. “She sees herself as having skills that other people don’t have that are a value to her community and even to the world.”
After a run on the festival circuit the filmmakers plan to provide young people with teaching materials to learn how bicycles can benefit society.
“We believe the bicycle is something that kids cannot only learn from but they all get at that age,” said Seigel-Boettner . “And it’s not a really complicated development intervention that takes a lot of explaining. It’s something that’s very tangible and the film makes sense to them. So we feel through the film we really want kids when they’re getting car keys to really think about the bike in a different way and realize how it can impact their lives and impact their peers around the world.”
For more information visit www.withmyowntwowheels.org.
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

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A walk in the park with John Muir - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/a-walk-in-the-park-with-john-muir/ Tue, 19 Apr 2011 15:35:23 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5132 http://joytripproject.com/2011/a-walk-in-the-park-with-john-muir/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/a-walk-in-the-park-with-john-muir/feed/ 0 01 Lee Stetson 1 Yosemite Valley California, president day: I’m walking with my recorder along a wooded path with a long bearded man wearing period clothing circa 1890, a tweed coat, a wool vest with a red pocket square and wide brimmed hat. Ahead of us is Yosemite Falls, a massive flowage of water running white […] 01 Lee Stetson 1 Yosemite Valley California, president day: I’m walking with my recorder along a wooded path with a long bearded man wearing period clothing circa 1890, a tweed coat, a wool vest with a red pocket square and wide brimmed hat. 01 Lee Stetson 1
Yosemite Valley California, president day: I’m walking with my recorder along a wooded path with a long bearded man wearing period clothing circa 1890, a tweed coat, a wool vest with a red pocket square and wide brimmed hat. Ahead of us is Yosemite Falls, a massive flowage of water running white and fast, churning with melted snow from the high country upstream. The man describes a fanciful vision of what we see.
“Can you imagine? Can you imagine if in the midst of its headlong descent with all this whirling fairy springtime spray and those rushing comet tails that the fall was suddenly frozen solid and then carried bodily out into the middle of the valley that we might go around it and see it from all sides in the sunshine,” he says. “Oh was a show it would make. This colossal white pillar half a mile tall adorned with airy flowing drapery as if chiseled out of white marble.”
Who better with whom to tour one of America’s greatest National Parks than the man himself John Muir. As if transported back in time I had the rare opportunity to get his impressions on Yosemite today.
“Look at these high granite walls lying about 5,000 feet above sea level. With all the plant people and fellow mortals this good planet provides in this particular place makes it a very sacred place indeed,” he says. “It’s a true temple, a temple I think people would need to thrive in. And those who visit it now-a-days will have an opportunity to because it’s been persevered for so long and so carefully by so many. It is a great pleasure indeed to have it remain for all of us for our own health and vigor.”
Our National Parks began as idea. They are monuments to the notion that all people no matter their degree of wealth, social status, race or ethnicity have a fundamental right to commune with natural world and receive the life affirming benefits of wild and scenic places. Today we visit Yosemite and talk to historian and actor Lee Stetson who in voice of John Muir explains why our National Parks are indeed America’s best idea.
Stetson appears as the voice and image of John Muir the PBS television documentary film series “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea” by Ken Burns. To find out when the series will air in your community visit PBS.org/kenburns.
 
Music this week by the Conductive Alliance

The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks to support of our sponsor Patagonia.



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The Freedom Riders - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-freedom-riders/ Fri, 15 Apr 2011 17:36:27 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=5100 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-freedom-riders/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-freedom-riders/feed/ 0 Now that spring is in the air it’s time to start thinking about that next great road trip. In the coming weeks I’ll pack up the Jetta and head out on a tour of the adventure media and film festivals. Looking for stories that celebrate the active lifestyle and environmental conservation I’ll be reporting from […] Now that spring is in the air it’s time to start thinking about that next great road trip. In the coming weeks I’ll pack up the Jetta and head out on a tour of the adventure media and film festivals. Looking for stories that celebrate the active lifest... Now that spring is in the air it’s time to start thinking about that next great road trip. In the coming weeks I’ll pack up the Jetta and head out on a tour of the adventure media and film festivals. Looking for stories that celebrate the active lifestyle and environmental conservation I’ll be reporting from the 5Points Festival in Carbondale Colorado and then the Mountainfilm Festival in Telluride. But as I’m making my plans I can’t help but think about how much our nation has changed over the past half century. Last year at Mountain Film I met a man who helped me put the freedom of road travel into a different perspective.
Earnest “Rip” Patton is from Nashville, Tennessee. He’s considered an historian and a civil rights activist of the last 50s and early 60s.  Fifty years ago Rip was among first wave of student activists who road on buses into the Southern United States in the spring of 1961. Called the Freedom Rides the plan was to organize demonstrations in protest of racial segregation.
“We were at the time when the Freedom Rides were first started by CORE Congress of Racial Equality on May 4th 1961 we were trying to desegregate the movie theaters downtown,” Rip said.
The protesters came south to challenge the laws that prevented blacks and whites from using common public facilities like lunch counters, swimming pools and yes movie theaters. That bus trip through the south was met with hostility and violence. Most of the Freedom Riders were put jail, many were badly beaten and several of them were killed. Ironically Rip is telling me his story at a festival where a film depicting events of his life called the Freedom Riders had just premiered. Fifty years earlier he and his friends struggled through the spring of 1961 simply for the right to even be in the audience.
Last year at Mountain Film in Telluride I talked to Rip about his experience as a Freedom Rider. At this celebration of adventure culture it seemed all too appropriate to showcase a film based our recent history where travel played such an important role. I also connected with German-American artist Charlotta Janssen who had on display an amazing gallery show of paintings based on the mug shots of the arrested protesters. Despite great opposition Rip and the Freedom Riders held their ground. Through non-violent protests they successfully lead the charge to desegregate the south and inspire a new generation to demand their civil rights. It’s only because of the sacrifices they made that any of us can enjoy the freedom to travel that we do today.
 
Music this week  by blues guitarist Big Bill Broonzy
The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks to the support of our sponsor Patagonia
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Three Cups of Tea- The Play - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/three-cups-of-tea-the-play/ Sun, 20 Mar 2011 19:46:45 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4924 http://joytripproject.com/2011/three-cups-of-tea-the-play/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/three-cups-of-tea-the-play/feed/ 1 Millions of people around the world have read the bestselling book Three Cups of Tea. Written by David Oliver Relin and Greg Mortenson it’s the amazing true story of one man’s journey to turn a failed attempt to climb K2 into an international movement for peace. Working to build schools in the most remote regions […] Millions of people around the world have read the bestselling book Three Cups of Tea. Written by David Oliver Relin and Greg Mortenson it’s the amazing true story of one man’s journey to turn a failed attempt to climb K2 into an international movement ... Millions of people around the world have read the bestselling book Three Cups of Tea. Written by David Oliver Relin and Greg Mortenson it’s the amazing true story of one man’s journey to turn a failed attempt to climb K2 into an international movement for peace. Working to build schools in the most remote regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan Greg Mortenson has inspired the production of a one-man play about his life starring Curtis Nielson.
A Literature to Life production of The American Place Theater This stage adaptation of the popular book brings to life the spirit of exploration that delves to find the common threads of humanity that bind us all together. Three Cups of Tea is playing to captivated audiences across North America. This one-man show is a dramatic and heartwarming reenactment of the book. But Curtis Nielson’s portrayal of Greg Mortenson is a story in itself. In this interview recorded at the Banff Mountain Film Festival in Alberta, Canada Curtis tells us how his journey as actor has led him to discover many wonderful gifts on the stage of life.

Music this week by the Ahn Trio and Jake Shimabukuro

The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

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Alison Gannett saving snow - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/alison-gannett-saving-snow/ Mon, 31 Jan 2011 16:03:45 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4543 http://joytripproject.com/2011/alison-gannett-saving-snow/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2011/alison-gannett-saving-snow/feed/ 1 There are plenty of people out there talking about climate change. But how many are actually doing something about it. Even those of us who spend a lot of time outdoors can be guilty of contributing to the destruction of the natural environment we love. We fly in jets from place to place for the […] There are plenty of people out there talking about climate change. But how many are actually doing something about it. Even those of us who spend a lot of time outdoors can be guilty of contributing to the destruction of the natural environment we love... Alison Gannett.

“I went to school for climate change and majored in education for environmental issues. And then I went to school for solar design for alternative home building,”

she said. “At the same time I had a professional skiing career, doing crazy things like the X-Games and jumping off cliffs for a living.”

But while she had two careers running parallel to one another Gannett suffered a devastating crash at the X-Game. Because she was badly injured and unable to compete several of her sponsors immediately dropped her. And that got Gannett to thinking. “I realized how shallow a lot of my ski industry sponsors were,” she said. “I decided wouldn’t it be cool to partner with companies that have more at stake and care more about than just selling clothing.”

Though many of the competitors and colleagues though she was crazy for chasing the more lucrative sponsorship deals Gannett changed her professional priorities to work instead with companies who share her environmentally conscious values.

“I want to chase ethics,” she said. “I want to work with companies that have the same beliefs that I do.”
It turns out that there are plenty of sponsors out there willing to support Gannett’s mission to raise awareness for the ongoing crisis of climate change. Blending her interests in sustainable living and an active lifestyle, she’s proven to be a very effective spokesperson for both.

“As an athlete getting older I’d have to say that I have better sponsor relationships now than I ever did,” she said. “And now working with the Save Our Snow Foundation and working with schools, working with Congress, working with the White House I’m saving our snow, saving our planet and making the world a better place.”

Allison Gannett is the kind of adventure athlete that walks her talk. While still leading an exciting life as a professional skier she’s making a big difference in educating the general public on the realities of climate change. And Through her work at the Save Our Snow Foundation and on her own organic farm in Colorado she’s showing us what we each can to do to slow it down.
Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

Special thanks to The Outdoor Retailer Winter Market


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The Extreme Ice Survey - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-extreme-ice-survey/ Mon, 10 Jan 2011 12:58:43 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4498 http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-extreme-ice-survey/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2011/the-extreme-ice-survey/feed/ 0 Any photographer will tell you, seeing is believing. But when it comes to climate change, a long slow process that occurs over time, its difficult to capture a single image that demonstrates the sheer magnitude of this global crisis. Even though the most obvious and apparent result of our warming planet is the recession of […] Any photographer will tell you, seeing is believing. But when it comes to climate change, a long slow process that occurs over time, its difficult to capture a single image that demonstrates the sheer magnitude of this global crisis. Any photographer will tell you, seeing is believing. But when it comes to climate change, a long slow process that occurs over time, its difficult to capture a single image that demonstrates the sheer magnitude of this global crisis. Even though the most obvious and apparent result of our warming planet is the recession of glacial ice, in some of the most remote places in the world it’s hard to truly show how relatively quickly and dramatically that ice is melting. So photographer James Balog came up with a plan to record the progress of climate change by taking a series of pictures from specific locations near glaciers over the course of several months.
“We have time-lapse cameras installed permanently at these various glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Montana, Alaska and soon to be around Mount Everest,” Balog said. “And these cameras shoot every half hour around the clock as long as it’s daylight and they’re looking down on these glaciers that are changing and we make this visual record of the landscape in flux.”
Called the Extreme Ice Survey these images around the world shot on tripods show the cascade of glacial ice as it forms and then melts. The passage of time is quickly sped up to show the pace of change and its apparent progress.
“These cameras shoot all year long and we sometimes don’t get back for a year or more to download the images,” Balog said. “But once we get the pictures we run them through video post production and turn them into a film clip showing the landscape as it changed over that previous period of time.
In these film clips glacial ice melts at a rate consistent with the human perception of time. Weeks and then months literally pass in the blink of an eye. As Balog’s cameras watch around the clock his images are making an enduring record of melting glaciers that are amazing and a bit frightening to behold. The images that James Balog and his team continue to capture through the Extreme Ice Survey offer compelling proof of receding glaciers around world. This evidence on a global scale is clear to see and even the most skeptical deniers of climate change may come to believe.

Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro
The Joy Trip Project is made possible with the support of sponsor Patagonia

Special thanks to The Outdoor Retailer Winter Market


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Mountain 2 Mountain - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/mountain-2-mountain/ Wed, 29 Dec 2010 13:23:04 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4462 http://joytripproject.com/2010/mountain-2-mountain/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/mountain-2-mountain/feed/ 3   An interview with executive director Shannon Galpin In her travels through Afghanistan the locals call Shannon Galpin the blond, blue-eyed infidel. At 36 this mountain bike racer from Breckenridge, Colorado makes her way through active war zones waging peace. As the executive director of her own non-governmental organization called Mountain 2 Mountain Shannon works […]   An interview with executive director Shannon Galpin In her travels through Afghanistan the locals call Shannon Galpin the blond, blue-eyed infidel. At 36 this mountain bike racer from Breckenridge, Colorado makes her way through active war zones wagi... An interview with executive director Shannon Galpin

In her travels through Afghanistan the locals call Shannon Galpin the blond, blue-eyed infidel. At 36 this mountain bike racer from Breckenridge, Colorado makes her way through active war zones waging peace. As the executive director of her own non-governmental organization called Mountain 2 Mountain Shannon works on behalf of vulnerable women and children caught in the crossfire.
“Our focus is to look at women in Afghanistan as beyond the victims but as the solutions and as the agents of change, “ Shannon said “and that these women that we are trying to work with through education and training are truly the solutions for the country.”
Afghanistan has been a place of violent conflict for more than 40 years and with U.S. Troops on the ground now for almost a decade ordinary people, with no special training like Shannon are getting involved trying to find a peaceful solution.
“I started traveling over there two or three years ago. I have spent time living in the middle east,” Shannon said. “I lived in Lebanon and traveled throughout the Middle East for a couple of years and I have always connected with the regions that have the worst human rights, that have the worst gender equity rights.”
A single mother with a daughter at home Shannon is like many American women frustrated with the plight of people here at home and half a world away who suffer largely because of their gender.
“What I realized was that I was ranting a lot and I was upset about it, and it was old adage of be the change that you want to see in the world,” Shannon said, and instead of complaining I should just get off my ass and do it.”

So Shannon took action. No kidding. She sold her house and started a non-profit that goes directly to serve women and children in Afghanistan. Mountain 2 Mountain provides education and pre-natal opportunities that empower women to take control of their lives. And with stable households where children, boys and girls, are encouraged to go to school how much more likely are the prospects of peace in the future?
“I want to see ripple effects in Afghanistan that effect the ability of women to have control over their destiny,” Shannon said.
You can’t help but be inspired by Shannon’s story. Hers is the kind of narrative that makes this program so much fun and really an honor to produce. But while I was piecing together the sound clips for today’s episode I came across a piece of information that we didn’t discuss in our interview. So I had to get Shannon on the phone and have her take me back to something that happened almost 20 years ago.
“When I was 17 I had moved to Minneapolis right after high school graduation,” Shannon said. “And I decided that I was going to pursue a career as a dancer and was basically working and living in downtown Minneapolis.”
She had left her home in North Dakota to begin a life dramatically different than the one she leads today. But something happened in Minneapolis that changed the course of her destiny.
“I was working late one night and instead of taking the bus that I should have taken I took an earlier bus, which dropped me off on the far side of a park,” she said. “And through a series of, looking back now bad choices or bad decisions I walked through the park and I was attacked.”
To put it bluntly Shannon was raped. A stranger wearing a ski mask caring a knife brutally assaulted her and left her for dead. Though she survived and reassembled the shattered piece of her, Shannon would come to realize that even though she put that chapter of her life in the past her journey through it was far from over.
Music this week by new contributing artist Cheryl B. Englehardt
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Robert Egger - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/robert-egger/ Sat, 18 Dec 2010 21:07:57 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4417 http://joytripproject.com/2010/robert-egger/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/robert-egger/feed/ 1 An interview with the founder of the D.C. Central Kitchen In the spirit of charitable giving Robert Egger is leading the charge in America to show that philanthropy and looking out for the best interest of others can be business as usual. Dedicated to feeding the homeless and providing job training for the formerly incarcerated […] An interview with the founder of the D.C. Central Kitchen In the spirit of charitable giving Robert Egger is leading the charge in America to show that philanthropy and looking out for the best interest of others can be business as usual. the D.C. Central Kitchen

In the spirit of charitable giving Robert Egger is leading the charge in America to show that philanthropy and looking out for the best interest of others can be business as usual. Dedicated to feeding the homeless and providing job training for the formerly incarcerated Egger’s work at the D.C. Central Kitchen serves the poor in our nation’s capital.
In cooperation with restaurants and catering business, the D.C. Kitchen collects more than 3,000 pounds of surplus food each day. The non-profit makes 4,500 meals that are distributed to over 100 shelters, transitional housing facilities and rehabilitation centers throughout the Washington D.C. area. And Robert Egger travels the country giving talks on the value of philanthropic giving as an engine for social change. At the D.C. Central Kitchen Egger is using food to build stronger communities, combating hunger while creating opportunities.
The Joy Trip Project is made possible through the generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. Check out their latest new media projects and conservation initiatives at their blog the cleanest line.com.

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Karina Hollekim - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/karina-hollekim/ Sun, 12 Dec 2010 22:45:25 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4390 http://joytripproject.com/2010/karina-hollekim/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/karina-hollekim/feed/ 1 After a long career as a professional skier and BASE jumper Karina Hollekim was living her dream. In 2006 at the paragliding world cup in Switzerland she and a group of friends were invited to do an exhibition jump. It was just going to be a routine flight in wing suits sailing away from an […] After a long career as a professional skier and BASE jumper Karina Hollekim was living her dream. In 2006 at the paragliding world cup in Switzerland she and a group of friends were invited to do an exhibition jump. After a long career as a professional skier and BASE jumper Karina Hollekim was living her dream. In 2006 at the paragliding world cup in Switzerland she and a group of friends were invited to do an exhibition jump. It was just going to be a routine flight in wing suits sailing away from an airplane to entertain a crowd of thousands below. Flying high overhead Karina couldn’t have been more happy.
“I was there with friends I was having fun and everything was just perfect,” she said.
Karina made the jump from a small plane and carved  turns through the sky in her wing suit. As she flew  she filmed the others with a camera mounted on her helmet.
“I could see the smile on the face of my friend and everything was great. I was suppose to open the parachute and land on the grassy field in front of the spectators. I could hear the clapping and roaring from the thousands of spectators underneath,” she said. “And then a split second later I realized that something had gone wrong. And 15 seconds later my life was changed forever.”
When Karina pulled the ripcord her parachute deployed, but there was a malfunction.
“I had what we call a line-over and when you have this it’s impossible to control the canopy and it starts spinning,” she said. “I spun uncontrollably toward the ground at more than 100 kilometers an hour.”
With no way to break her fall she hit the ground, her body sprawled across a huge boulder.
“And normally I think big rocks are something you don’t want to hit. But I think actually this particular rock saved my life. Because by hitting this rock it crushed everything that I had from my hips on down. I had four fractures in my left leg, left femur. I had broken knees. I had 21 open fractures in my right thigh. But it saved by back and it saved my head and therefore I was still alive.
Despite these devastating injuries Karina Hollekim survived. And in the years that followed she forged an incredible journey to not only recover physically, but reclaim much of the life she loved while going on to inspire others.

Music this week by new contributing artist Cheryl B. Englehardt
The Joy Trip Project is made possible through the generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. Check out their latest new media projects and conservation initiatives at their blog the cleanest line.com.

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Stones Into Schools - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/stones-into-schools/ Fri, 19 Nov 2010 20:59:06 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4280 http://joytripproject.com/2010/stones-into-schools/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/stones-into-schools/feed/ 0 An interview with the author Greg Mortenson It’s been on the New York Times bestseller list for 197 weeks. The book Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin continues to engage and inspire millions of people around world. This story of one man’s journey to build schools for children in the […] An interview with the author Greg Mortenson It’s been on the New York Times bestseller list for 197 weeks. The book Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin continues to engage and inspire millions of people around world.
It’s been on the New York Times bestseller list for 197 weeks. The book Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin continues to engage and inspire millions of people around world. This story of one man’s journey to build schools for children in the most remote regions Pakistan and Afghanistan has helped to forge a better understanding of how to encourage peace and cooperation where there has been only war and armed conflict for decades. But when I met with Mortenson at the MountainFilm Festival in Telluride Colorado he shared with me his latest project.
“The second book I wrote, Stones Into Schools, is more about Afghanistan,” he said in an interview. “It’s also about the lessons I learned in Three Cups of Tea about empowering the people, listening to the elders, about really letting the people themselves do the work. So I tried in the to really show that people themselves can be empowered.”

Stones Into Schools isn’t just a sequel to a popular piece of non-fiction. It’s a testament to the impact one person can make in the lives of others. By providing the people of Afghanistan with the tools they need to help themselves, Mortenson is doing more than building schools. He’s paving a long road toward a world that lives in peace.
A short documentary called Stones Into Schools based on the new book is currently part of the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour.

Stones into Schools

– Watch more Videos at Vodpod.
Music this week by Chad Farran
The Joy Trip Project is made possible through the generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. Check out their latest new media projects and conservation initiatives at their blog the cleanest line.com.

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Point of no return - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/point-of-no-return/ Fri, 12 Nov 2010 14:00:11 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=4221 http://joytripproject.com/2010/point-of-no-return/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/point-of-no-return/feed/ 0 An interview with Sender Films producers Nick Rosen and Peter Mortimer I just got back from the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Held every year in November at the Banff Center in Alberta, Canada this celebration of alpine culture marks the end of one adventure season and the beginning of the next. After putting in time […] An interview with Sender Films producers Nick Rosen and Peter Mortimer I just got back from the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Held every year in November at the Banff Center in Alberta, Canada this celebration of alpine culture marks the end of one adv... Sender Films producers Nick Rosen and Peter Mortimer



I just got back from the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Held every year in November at the Banff Center in Alberta, Canada this celebration of alpine culture marks the end of one adventure season and the beginning of the next. After putting in time at the MountainFilm Festival Telluride and few other events throughout the year I’ve had the chance to see a lot of movies about athletes and explorers pushing the boundaries of the human experience. But one film in particular hits really close home. Called Point of No Return this movie for television produced by Sender Films depicts of lives of guys I once knew who died tragically in the pursuit of a dream.
Climbers Jonny Copp and Micah Dash with cameraman Wade Johnson were killed in the making of this film. While making their retreat from a failed attempt to climb Mount Edgar in western China, a devastating avalanche swept through the region to claim their lives.  With footage recovered with their bodies the movie Point of No Return is a tribute to three men who paid the ultimate price to follow their passion for adventure. I had the opportunity to talk to producers Peter Mortimer and Nick Rosen to discuss both the risks and the consequences of a lifestyle that is often fraught with danger. Is it worth it living life on the edge?

Point of No Return – First Ascent from Mountainfilm in Telluride on Vimeo.
The film Point of No Return is part of the First Ascent Series produced by Sender Films in Cooperation with National Geographic. You get The Six Episode DVD Box Set on line at www.Senderfilms.com
Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro
The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks the generous support of sponsor Patagonia. Check out their latest new media  projects and conservation initiatives at their blog www.thecleanestline.com.
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The Dom & Ernie Project - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-dom-ernie-project-2/ Mon, 13 Sep 2010 11:00:30 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3903 http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-dom-ernie-project-2/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-dom-ernie-project-2/feed/ 0 An all inclusive adventure for the disabled only I’m packing my bags and taking this show on the road. And you’re wondering, so what’s new? James you travel all the time. That’s right. I do. The Joy Trip Project is all about venturing out into the wide world and finding those stories about people who […] An all inclusive adventure for the disabled only I’m packing my bags and taking this show on the road. And you’re wondering, so what’s new? James you travel all the time. That’s right. I do. The Joy Trip Project is all about venturing out into the wide... I’m packing my bags and taking this show on the road. And you’re wondering, so what’s new? James you travel all the time. That’s right. I do. The Joy Trip Project is all about venturing out into the wide world and finding those stories about people who are doing what they can to make a difference, to make the world a better place. But this time, it’s just a bit different. This time, I’m going to Africa.
You’ll find out why exactly I’m going intercontinental in an upcoming edition. So stay tuned. But yesterday, and I mean while I’m sorting my socks and underwear I get a text message from my friend adventure filmmaker and a true Joy Tripper Dominic Gill. You’ve met him on the show before. Dom’s from the United Kingdom, the UK. He’s riding his bike across the country from LA to New York on a trip he calls The Dom & Ernie Project. And on my iPhone it says: James we just crossed into Wisconsin. We’ll be in Madison tonight.
Believe it or not, I dropped everything. Cleared my schedule and made plans, because Dom and I just had to visit. And for you my loyal listeners I just had to bring you his story. Because Dom’s not just riding across the country, that’s been done to death. Just like before in the last story he’s riding a tandem bicycle and all along the way he’s picking up people, random strangers to come along on the ride. Before when he road 20,000 miles from Alaska to Argentina he’d pick up just about anyone. But this time he’s only bringing along people with a disability.
“We had Ryan with traumatic brain injury. Then we had Carlos who is visually impaired. The after that we had two brothers, Warren and Chad Woodbury who had muscular dystrophy,” Dominic said. “And then 59-year-old Kelly Lane who has Parkinson’s disease, he jumped on. And then he switched out with Rachel who has Cerebral Palsy and she’s just cycled 250-miles from Minneapolis where she lives to here.”
These are people with profound disabilities, people who under normal circumstances would never have the opportunity to take part in such an amazing adventure. And yet thanks to the Dom & Ernie Project Dominic and his crew Alonzo and Nadia, these disabled cyclists are getting out and experiencing the world. They’re traveling hundreds of miles in a way they may have never dreamed of before.

Listen to the first Dominic Gill interview on the Joy Trip Project: Take A Seat
Music by Chad Farran and The Ahn Trio

The Joy Trip Project is bought to you thanks to  sponsors  Patagonia, Osprey, Clik Elite and Mountain Hardwear. Their generous support makes this latest series of stories possible. Support us by supporting them


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The Last Man on the Mountain - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-last-man-on-the-mountain/ Fri, 27 Aug 2010 00:02:41 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3680 http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-last-man-on-the-mountain/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-last-man-on-the-mountain/feed/ 1 An interview with author Jennifer Jordan In 1939 Dudley Wolfe was on one of the earliest expeditions to reach the summit of K2. An adventurer and one of the wealthiest men in the world he was left for dead with a rescue team of Sherpa after a devastating avalanche. Some say he was the victim […] An interview with author Jennifer Jordan In 1939 Dudley Wolfe was on one of the earliest expeditions to reach the summit of K2. An adventurer and one of the wealthiest men in the world he was left for dead with a rescue team of Sherpa after a devastati... In 1939 Dudley Wolfe was on one of the earliest expeditions to reach the summit of K2. An adventurer and one of the wealthiest men in the world he was left for dead with a rescue team of Sherpa after a devastating avalanche. Some say he was the victim of his own foolishness, others say he was abandoned by the members of his climbing party as they fled the mountain to save their own lives. And even though his body has been found there remains a great deal of controversy around Wolfe’s death that continues to this day. In her book “The Last Man on the Mountain” Jennifer Jordan gives us a close look into life of an American adventurer and the first to die on K2.

This interview with the Jennifer Jordan was recorded on location at the Mountainfilm Festival in Telluride, Colorado. The book Last Man on the Mountain is now out in hardcover. You can find more information online, visit jenniferjordan.net.




Music this week by the Dave Mathews Band.



This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.



Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories. share your passion for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friends. Until next time take care.
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Let Me Down Easy - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/let-me-down-easy/ Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:37:05 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3635 http://joytripproject.com/2010/let-me-down-easy/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/let-me-down-easy/feed/ 1 I know. It’s been a long time since the last audio edition of The Joy Trip Project. But if you’ve been following the blog and the Facebook page you’ll know that I’ve been traveling on an extend Joy Trip. I just got back. Over the past several weeks of summer I’ve been conducting interviews and […] I know. It’s been a long time since the last audio edition of The Joy Trip Project. But if you’ve been following the blog and the Facebook page you’ll know that I’ve been traveling on an extend Joy Trip. I just got back. I know. It’s been a long time since the last audio edition of The Joy Trip Project. But if you’ve been following the blog and the Facebook page you’ll know that I’ve been traveling on an extend Joy Trip. I just got back. Over the past several weeks of summer I’ve been conducting interviews and collecting stories about people and institutions hard at work making the world a better place.
I know that sounds like hyperbole or so vague that it sounds almost meaningless. But there’s really no other way for me to describe the athletes, artist and activists who find their way on this show. Yeah I know we talk a lot about climbing mountains or making movies about people who climb mountains or base jumping or kayaking or whatever, the point is these people work at protecting the planet and improving the lives of others by being actively engaged in the world in which they live. Through their stories about their adventures they stand as an example of how each of us can make a difference in the course our own lives and perhaps do some good.
A few weeks ago I was at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride. And if you’ve ever been you’ll know this annual celebration of adventure culture through cinema is about a lot more than high altitude thrill rides and adrenaline induced mayhem. The collected speakers, authors, and filmmakers give us a look from their perspective into the many complex questions of life. One of the presenters and judge in the film competition was the actress Anna Deavere Smith. And while she’s not a climber or a skier or any type of outdoor professional through the power of storytelling she has the ability show us a glimpse into the lives others who ponder these same questions.
As part of her research to develop characters for Let Me Down Easy Ms. Smith interviewed a 340 people at the Yale School of Medicine facing their own mortality as they navigate their way through the American healthcare system. This isn’t the kind of story I usually do on the Project. But I felt this presentation is important because those of us who lead healthy, down right vigorous active lives probably never think about how people in our community, probably people you know deal with chronic illness. And I’m sure few enough of us realize how much courage it takes to stare death in the face when retreat is not an option.
This edition of the Joy Trip Project is dedicated to the memory of Public Radio Producer Carolyn Jensen Chadwick who passed away as this piece was in production. She and her husband Alex Chadwick, the producers of National Geographic Radio Expeditions on NPR, inspired the creation of this program. And for that we will always be grateful.
Music this week by Chad Farran and Chris Isaak.
The Joy Trip Project is brought to thanks to the generous support of our sponsor Patagonia makers fine outdoor clothing. I’m thrilled to report that they’ve signed on for another year. So again Thank you! Find them online at Patagonia.com.

This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.



Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on  clean 14:51 3635
The Cove - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-cove/ Wed, 07 Jul 2010 16:51:55 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3478 http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-cove/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-cove/feed/ 3 An interview with director Louie Psihoyos The truths discovered in documentary films often reveal far more than meet the eye. In his Oscar winning movie “the Cove” photojournalist Louie Psihoyos takes us on an adventure that perhaps shows us more than we want to see. “I lead an elite team of activists to penetrate a […] An interview with director Louie Psihoyos The truths discovered in documentary films often reveal far more than meet the eye. In his Oscar winning movie “the Cove” photojournalist Louie Psihoyos takes us on an adventure that perhaps shows us more than ...
The truths discovered in documentary films often reveal far more than meet the eye. In his Oscar winning movie “
the Cove” photojournalist Louie Psihoyos takes us on an adventure that perhaps shows us more than we want to see.
“I lead an elite team of activists to penetrate a secret cove in Japan to reveal a dark secret,” Psihoyos said.
The Cove, part action thriller, part nature film is the exciting story behind a covert operation to document one of the most horrific atrocities of the 21st century, the systematic slaughter of dolphins.
“They kill more dolphins than anywhere on the planet right there at this cove, which incidentally is in a Japanese national park, a marine sanctuary,” Psihoyos said. That’s the irony of this whole thing. But it’s also the scene of the captive dolphin trade. Most of the captive dolphins in the world come from this little cove.”
Ever since I was a kid I’ve loved dolphins. These smiling marine mammals are the very image of fun and freedom. Growing up in Southern California I used love to see the dolphin and killer whale shows at ocean theme parks like Marine Land and Sea World. But I never really gave any thought to where these animals came from. The captive dolphin industry was started more than 50 years ago by a man named Rick O’Barry.
“Rick O’Barry is the guy who captured and trained the four dolphins who collectively played the part of Flipper, the popular 1960s television series ‘Flipper’,” said Psihoyos. “And (he) spent about 10 years building that industry up and he’s sent the last 40 tearing it down. The turning point for him was when Cathy, the primary dolphin that played the part of Flipper committed suicide in his arms that he realized that they are more sentient, more intelligent than anyone realized including himself and really turned himself around after that, and he’s probably become the world’s best known dolphin advocate.”
One of the greatest ironies in nature is the dolphin’s smile. In captivity that characteristic grin masks a deep sorrow of intelligent creatures that are rounded up and put on display for our amusement. And in the Cove those less suited for the marine mammal sideshow are killed and butchered to be eaten.  But here’s the greatest irony. With high levels of mercury in the world’s oceans brought on by industrial pollution dolphin meat is toxic.
In this interview with Louie Psihoyos recorded at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride  the Joy Trip Project brings you this incredible story.
New music this week by Chad Farran from his album Another Ride. Find more of his work online at www.chadfarran.com.
This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsor Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.



Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or se...]]> James Edward Mills clean 17:48 3478 O-Dub Raps climbing in music - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/o-dub-raps-climbing-in-music/ Thu, 24 Jun 2010 16:21:53 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3442 http://joytripproject.com/2010/o-dub-raps-climbing-in-music/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/o-dub-raps-climbing-in-music/feed/ 1 One of the great pleasure of putting together this podcast every week is finding those amazing individuals whose work bring art and culture together to tell the story of adventure. Unfortunately it’s not often that I can make a more direct connection to the active lifestyle through the performing art of music. But more two […] One of the great pleasure of putting together this podcast every week is finding those amazing individuals whose work bring art and culture together to tell the story of adventure. Unfortunately it’s not often that I can make a more direct connection t... O-Dub. His name was derived while a blending his love for music with his passion for climbing wide cracks on rock walls commonly called off-widths.
“I was recording songs in a studio in a bad neighborhood in Cincinnati. I was the only white that recorded in the studio,” O-Dub said. “And I came out of the booth one day to record a song…the song “Off-Widths.” And these thugged-out guys with white T-Shirts down to their knees are all staring at me like I’m an idiot. Like what is this guy talking about?
“They understood the spirit of the song, but they didn’t have a clue what I was talking about. So they caught onto the word off-width and started using it like ‘off the hook’ or ‘off the chain’ like ‘Man! That was off-width.’ So they used it all week while I was in there recording. And they started calling me off-width and then someone shortened it to O-Dub and it just went from there.”
With topical lyrics and bouncy jams authentic to his own experience Kris O-Dub Hampton brings the art of song writing to the sport of climbing. Through his rap songs he’s creating new anthems to both inspire and chronicle the life of adventure but with a modern twist that still’s reminiscent of the poets and ballad writers in the classic style of the mountaineering tradition.
The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thanks to our  sponsor Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them. Find a link to their web sites on ours at JoyTripProject.com

Special social media coverage of the New River Rendezvous comes courtesy of Osprey, Prana, Trango, Sterling Rope, Evolv, Chaco, the New River Alliance of Climbers and Waterstone Outdoors.

Social media is a vibrant exchange of ideas.  Join the conversation by becoming engaged.  Send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com. Or find us on Facebook or Twitter

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Chris Sharma - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/chris-sharma/ Wed, 16 Jun 2010 17:01:58 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3375 http://joytripproject.com/2010/chris-sharma/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/chris-sharma/feed/ 6 Once you reach a certain point in your career it’s great to be able to sit back and reflect upon what you’ve accomplished. It’s gratifying to see in hindsight how far you’ve come and this vantage point you can also look forward to what you have yet to achieve in the future. At the age […] Once you reach a certain point in your career it’s great to be able to sit back and reflect upon what you’ve accomplished. It’s gratifying to see in hindsight how far you’ve come and this vantage point you can also look forward to what you have yet to ... Chris Sharma is in a good position to see the route his life has taken so far and start making plans to a forge a new line, a course of travel into the years that lie ahead.
Known as one of the strongest sport climbers in world today, Chris Sharma continues to set the curve for aspiring and professional rock monkeys alike. Appearing in several feature films he first came to my attention back in 2007 during a pre-release screening of the movie King Lines. In this production from Sender Films Sharma introduced audiences to the emerging discipline of deep water soloing where climbers scale incredibly hard routes on rock faces high above ocean pools. In King Lines he works a particularly difficult problem whose crux is a 7-foot dyno to be stuck or risk a 60-foot fall to sea below.
Combining athleticism and a profound appreciation for the natural world Chris Sharma is a climber of both strength and grace that defines the lifestyle and passion of a man comfortable in the profession he loves.


See Chris Sharma in  Sender Film’s “First Ascent: The Series” available on DVD and online download in September
Music by Chad Farran and new contributing artist Erich Lenk


The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thanks to our  sponsor Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them. Find a link to their web sites on ours at JoyTripProject.com

Special social media coverage of the New River Rendezvous comes courtesy of Osprey, Prana, Trango, Sterling Rope, Evolv, Chaco, the New River Alliance of Climbers and Waterstone Outdoors.

Social media is a vibrant exchange of ideas.  Join the conversation by becoming engaged.  Send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com. Or find us on Facebook or clean 3375
New River Bridge BASE Jump - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/new-river-bridge-base-jump/ Mon, 24 May 2010 15:54:24 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3287 http://joytripproject.com/2010/new-river-bridge-base-jump/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/new-river-bridge-base-jump/feed/ 0 If your friend jumps off a bridge does that mean you should too? Moms’ old admonition doesn’t mean what it used to as BASE jumpers, friends of my mine, are leaping from high dangerous spots all over the world. Sorry mom. I can’t wait to try it. About a week ago I watched for the […] If your friend jumps off a bridge does that mean you should too? Moms’ old admonition doesn’t mean what it used to as BASE jumpers, friends of my mine, are leaping from high dangerous spots all over the world. Sorry mom. I can’t wait to try it.

About a week ago I watched for the first time as a friend hurled himself off the bridge that spans the
New River Gorge in Fayetteville, West Virginia. I’ll refer to him only as my friend because a jump from this 876-foot structure is illegal. And though he landed safely with the aid of a parachute, twice in fact, I don’t want to see him get into trouble.
Certainly my friend risked his own life and potentially put others in danger (but that’s a stretch). As a legal matter BASE-jumping, in my opinion, is a victimless crime that, rather than prosecution, deserves recognition as a legitimate sport and regulation by a body of experts to assure its safety.
Not unlike any hazardous sport BASE-jumping offers many inherent risks. But these risks are mitigated with training and experience. The two jumps depicted in this short film were the latest of more than 65 successful dives from an Antenna, a Span or the Earth.
“I’m only an ASE-jumper,” my friend said. “I haven’t jumped from a building yet.”
Prior to hurdling himself off landed structures, my friend first received instruction in skydiving, jumping from airplanes. He learned to pack his own shoot and properly maintain his equipment. Safety among BASE-jumpers is their first concern. Should I take up the sport and can assure you that I’ll take every precaution and learn important skills before I even attempt a jump from a great height. And though many people have died while BASE-jumping despite their advance preparation, as in any risky venture, those who do it accept the danger as an intrinsic aspect of the sport they love.
What remains to be considered is the crime of trespass, when BASE-jumpers like my friend seek and acquire unlawful access to private or public property to ply their skills. While there are many legal places from which to plummet these guarded and prohibited spots bring with them a different kind of risk that’s also quite alluring. That begs the question: should illegal BASE-jumpers who land successfully be prosecuted if they are caught? As long as they do not damage property or cause harm to others should they be fined or incarcerated?
I for one believe they should not. What do you think? Greater risk would likely ensue should BASE-jumpers try to flee from authorities, taking flight desperate not to get caught. But there would also be the risk of chaotic lawlessness should BASE-jumpers of varying degrees of experience and expertise attempt leaps without the fear of legal ramifications. What’s to stop them?
It’s human nature to explore and push the boundaries of our natural environment, our comfort zone. Adventure is the acceptance of risk in the hope of an ecstatic experience that will affirm the very life we put on the line. The alternative is a life without passion or purpose tethered to the Earth chained down in an existence of mediocrity. The law and safety not withstanding there will always be an intense appeal to those of adventurous spirit with the utter audacity to presume that they can fly.
Happy landings.   -JEM
Special social media coverage of the New River Rendezvous comes courtesy of Osprey, Prana, Trango, Sterling Rope, Evolv, clean 3287 Lynn Hill - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/lynn-hill/ Wed, 12 May 2010 13:40:30 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3184 http://joytripproject.com/2010/lynn-hill/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/lynn-hill/feed/ 2 I just got a  new set of tires from my Volkswagen Jetta. Got an oil change and I’m packing my gear for the next Joy Trip. I’ll be heading east for the first time to report from The New River Rendezvous in Fayetteville, West Virginia. The three-day event is another one of those terrific gatherings […] I just got a  new set of tires from my Volkswagen Jetta. Got an oil change and I’m packing my gear for the next Joy Trip. I’ll be heading east for the first time to report from The New River Rendezvous in Fayetteville, West Virginia. The New River Rendezvous in Fayetteville, West Virginia. The three-day event is another one of those terrific gatherings of our tribe, we who find adventure in play at climbing, mountain biking, kayaking, trail running. Maybe one day I’ll try BASE Jumping. In the heart of the New River Gorge there’ll be parties, clinics, a climbing comp, slide shows there’s even going to be a contest to see who can wear the most obnoxious, sexy or outrageous lycra tights. Should be a great time.
But you know the thing I love most about a trip like this is having the opportunity connect with old friends, folks I haven’t seen a while. Festivals like the New River Rendezvous bring together some amazing people, climbers mainly, men and women who’ve traveled all over the world and do daring things most of us only dream about.
Someone who I look forward to seeing over the weekend is Lynn Hill. In a career that spans more than 30 years, her contributions to the sport of climbing have been both groundbreaking and inspirational. One of the first female climbers to reach a position of prominence Lynn made a name for herself in 1979. She was the first woman to establish a 5.13 route called Ophir Broke in Ophir, Colorado. She’s perhaps best known for being the first person, man or woman, to free climb the Nose route on El Capitan in 1993 with legendary climber John Long. In 1994 she did it again with her partner Brooke Sandahl. Then she was the first to make the climb in a 24-hour period.
I had the opportunity speak with Lynn back in Bend, Oregon during the annual meeting of the American Alpine Club. This interview was originally recorded and produced in 2007 for the outdoor industry online trade magazine specialty news also know as SNEWS. In anticipation of the New River Rendezvous we’re bringing you this Joy Trip Flashback, a conversation with climber Lynn Hill.

Music by Jake Shimabukro
The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thanks to our  sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them. Find links to their web sites on ours at JoyTripProject.com


Special social media coverage of the New River Rendezvous comes courtesy of Osprey, Prana, Trango, Sterling Rope, Evolv, Chaco, the New River Alliance of Climbers and clean 16:55 3184 Making The Crooked Straight - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/making-the-crooked-straight/ Wed, 05 May 2010 13:46:12 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3135 http://joytripproject.com/2010/making-the-crooked-straight/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/making-the-crooked-straight/feed/ 0 It says in the Talmud, the sacred text of Jewish law, “Save one life and you save world.” Dr. Rick Hodes has saved dozens of lives and his continuing work in service of the children has made the world a better place for us all. A pediatric oncologist who specializes in the treatment of heart […] It says in the Talmud, the sacred text of Jewish law, “Save one life and you save world.” Dr. Rick Hodes has saved dozens of lives and his continuing work in service of the children has made the world a better place for us all. Dr. Rick Hodes has saved dozens of lives and his continuing work in service of the children has made the world a better place for us all.
A pediatric oncologist who specializes in the treatment of heart disease, spine disease and cancer, Dr. Hodes compassionately practices medicine at Mother Theresa’s Mission in Ethiopia. Caring for sick and destitute children in one of the most impoverished regions of the world he’s also the subject of a new book and a film for HBO called “Making the Crooked Straight.”
I met Dr. Hodes last year at the 2009 Mountainfilm Festival in Telluride Colorado. At an event packed with adventure movies and travel logs from around the world “Making the Crooked Straight” was a stand out favorite taking the top prize for best film and a cash award of $5,000.
Immediately after the closing ceremonies Dr. Hodes shared with me his story and few pictures of the children whose lives he saved.

Making the Crooked Straight – MF09 Trailer from Mountainfilm in Telluride on Vimeo.
Music this week by the Ahn Trio and new contributing artist John Common & Blinding Flashes of Light.
This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories. share your passion for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friends. Until next time take care.
]]> James Edward Mills clean 12:54 3135 Obama Signs Great Outdoor Initiative - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/obama-signs-great-outdoor-initiative/ Fri, 16 Apr 2010 17:04:58 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3064 http://joytripproject.com/2010/obama-signs-great-outdoor-initiative/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/obama-signs-great-outdoor-initiative/feed/ 1 I got up this morning already with a full plate. I was at my computer typing away at 6AM trying to get a head start on several projects in hopes that I could enjoy a gorgeous weekend outside. With three looming deadlines, including the latest edition of this podcast, the last thing I planned to […] I got up this morning already with a full plate. I was at my computer typing away at 6AM trying to get a head start on several projects in hopes that I could enjoy a gorgeous weekend outside. With three looming deadlines, Legacy on the Land.” Frank and Audrey are working to raise awareness for the importance of outdoor recreation especially as it pertains to people of color and the urban poor. The two of them along with a few other friends and colleagues are gathered today in Washington DC to attend the White House Conference on the Great Outdoors. A few hundred dignitaries from around the country were meeting to discuss new initiatives to get more people off the coach and outside. Audrey wrote in her email that the conference would be televised live and included an address from president Barack Obama.
So naturally I dropped everything, set up the computer and plugged in my digital recorder. If you missed it, I’m pleased to bring you the president’s comments. I’m not sure what the White House or the FCC will have to say about broadcast his speech, but until I get busted I hope enjoy what he had to say.
Immediately after the president’s address he signed a memorandum acknowledging his adminstration’s support for a national movement to get more people outdoors and directly involved in environmental conservation. If you’re interested learning more about how you might get involved check first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative. The president and his family are working to help all Americans live a more active, healthy lifestyle. You can too. Visit www.letsmove.gov.
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Project Tandem - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/project-tandem-2/ Mon, 12 Apr 2010 13:00:44 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=3020 http://joytripproject.com/2010/project-tandem-2/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/project-tandem-2/feed/ 2 You might have heard that not everyone agrees when it comes to climate change. While living in New York City, after graduating from college photographer Alan Winslow and journalist Morrigan McCarthy came to realize that across the America people have a difference of opinion. “Because living in New York City you can kind of feel […] You might have heard that not everyone agrees when it comes to climate change. While living in New York City, after graduating from college photographer Alan Winslow and journalist Morrigan McCarthy came to realize that across the America people have a... “Because living in New York City you can kind of feel like you’re in a bubble. Maybe any city is like that,” Morrigan said. “But that everyone around you has the same opinion and is in the same boat, especially when it comes to the environment. You know we should be recycling, we should be taking care of the planet.”
In a community full of liberals Morrigan and Alan believed that everyone would be eager to embrace sustainable practices and a lifestyle to mitigate the damaging effects of climate changes.
“But then we would see these poles and watch the news and it didn’t seem to be that way elsewhere, Morrigan said. “Otherwise every body would just be in the same boat and something would be happening. But we decided to take off and figure out what Americans were actually thinking. And Americans have all sorts of opinions.”
So the two started making plans to travel around the county taking pictures and asking questions. Through their journey, called Project Tandem Alan and Morrigan wanted to connect with everyday Americans across all walks of life to discover what they thought about the planet’s changing climate.
“So basically we decided to do it on bicycle, which almost started by default,” Morrigan said. “My father told me once about a friend he had in college who had biked across the country and we thought oh that’s so cool.”
Alan said it started with biking across the country. “And then we got to talking about it more and we figured how hard could it be to bike around the country and so it would give us the full diversity of America,” he said. “Because if we only went across the country we would only hit a certain thin band of America where we wanted to get as much of the population as we possibly could.”
Traveling just the two of them Alan and Morrigan peddled two bicycles 11,000 miles around the United States. Project Tandem aimed to illustrate the true opinions of the American people and what they truly believe when it comes to protecting the environment.

New music this week by Chad Farran from his album Another Ride. Find more of his work online at www.chadfarran.com.
This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories.]]>
James Edward Mills clean 16:58 3020
Vertical Ethiopia - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/vertical-ethiopia/ Wed, 24 Mar 2010 13:21:46 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2920 http://joytripproject.com/2010/vertical-ethiopia/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/vertical-ethiopia/feed/ 1 An interview with climber and writer Majka Burhardt If you’re a writer, there are few things better than to combine your passion for storytelling with something else that you truly love. For writer Majka Burhardt climbing has long been the subject of her many articles in adventure magazines. A certified rocking climbing instructor and a […] An interview with climber and writer Majka Burhardt If you’re a writer, there are few things better than to combine your passion for storytelling with something else that you truly love. For writer Majka Burhardt climbing has long been the subject of h...
If you’re a writer, there are few things better than to combine your passion for storytelling with something else that you truly love. For writer Majka Burhardt climbing has long been the subject of her many articles in adventure magazines. A certified rocking climbing instructor and a member of the American Mountain Guides Association Burhardt blends her love for the outdoors with vivid descriptions of scenic landscapes and literary portraits of the many interesting people she encounters.
But it was on a trip to Africa a few years ago that she discovered a unique opportunity to add one more passion to the mix. On a journey to explore the industry and culture of Ethiopia coffee, Burhardt found that when you least expect it you can find adventure in the most unlikely places.
“Well interestingly enough I saw a lot of crumbly basalt on that first trip,” Burhardt said. “But I realized that there was just so much potential in Ethiopia that was really unknown to rest of the world, mainly because we all associate with it drought, famine and war, and instead I’m in this bucolic countryside searching for wild coffee and I looked at these basalt faces and said, O.K. there’s got to be more because the topography is amazing.” You have things from the third highest peak in Africa all the way to one of the lowest points on earth. So there’s got to be climbing.”
So Burhardt put together to small team of her best climbing buddies all of them women, and one photographer, guy named Gabe Rogel, and headed back to Africa climb a few first ascents on mountain spires in the cradle of our most ancient civilizations. Her book Vertical Ethiopia tells the story in words and pictures behind this expedition to explore a world of new possibilities.

Check out Majka’s new film on climbing in Africa called Waypoint Namibia



Music this week by the band Khumbula

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories. share your passion for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friends. Until next time take care.
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James Edward Mills clean 2920
Planet Walker - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/planet-walker/ Mon, 08 Mar 2010 14:00:09 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2638 http://joytripproject.com/2010/planet-walker/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/planet-walker/feed/ 6 An interview with author John Francis In 1971 John Francis witnessed a catastrophic oil spill in San Francisco Bay. The greasy black sludge that coated resident sea life and stained nearby beaches left an indelible impression him as well. As a young man at the dawn of the environmental movement he felt compelled to act. […] An interview with author John Francis In 1971 John Francis witnessed a catastrophic oil spill in San Francisco Bay. The greasy black sludge that coated resident sea life and stained nearby beaches left an indelible impression him as well.
In 1971 John Francis witnessed a catastrophic oil spill in San Francisco Bay. The greasy black sludge that coated resident sea life and stained nearby beaches left an indelible impression him as well. As a young man at the dawn of the environmental movement he felt compelled to act. But what can one person do to change a society bent on its own destruction?
Left with little do that would make a difference in world Francis abandoned all forms of motorized transport. He started walking. But still hoping to make an impact on his community and himself Francis took his devotion a step future and swore a vow of silence. For 17 years he did not utter a word. And yet he still managed to earn college and graduate degrees in science and environmental studies.
Dr. John Francis went on to become the United Nation’s goodwill ambassador to the world’s grassroots communities and the U.S. Government hired him to help establish policies for the management of oil spills.
Music this week comes from singer/song writer Sean Michael Dargan and the band Rani Arbo & Daisy Mayhem


Special thanks to our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories. share your passion for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friends. Until next time take care.
]]>
James Edward Mills clean 15:08 2638
Love Hope Strength - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/love-hope-strength/ Sun, 28 Feb 2010 13:42:16 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2748 http://joytripproject.com/2010/love-hope-strength/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/love-hope-strength/feed/ 0 An interview with Love Hope Strength executive director Shannon Foley A couple of weeks ago I got an email from my friend Maitri. A friend of hers was in serious trouble and she wanted my help. “I’d seen her the day before and everything was fine. And she said, ‘I think my husband has leukemia‘.” […] An interview with Love Hope Strength executive director Shannon Foley A couple of weeks ago I got an email from my friend Maitri. A friend of hers was in serious trouble and she wanted my help. “I’d seen her the day before and everything was fine. An interview with Love Hope Strength executive director Shannon Foley
A couple of weeks ago I got an email from my friend Maitri. A friend of hers was in serious trouble and she wanted my help.
“I’d seen her the day before and everything was fine. And she said, ‘I think my husband has leukemia‘.” Maitri said. “And they’ve checked him into the UW cancer ward.”
Here in Madison the University of Wisconsin is home to one of top research facilities in the county the Carbone Cancer Center. With very little notice Maitri’s friend was immediately admitted to the affiliated community hospital.
“I was most surprised with how quickly it happened and how urgently the medical profession had to respond,” Maitri said. “Sunday I was at church with her. She went home after church. Her husband said ‘I have some pain in my legs. I think I’ll go to the doctor tomorrow.’ And she said ‘Let’s give the nurse on call a quick phone call and just make sure this is fine.’ The nurse said you need to go to the emergency room now. We went and they were ready to check him into the hospital that afternoon. So one minute fine, leg cramp, next minute checked into the UW Hospital ward.”
“With leukemia,”I said.
“Correct,” she said.
I’m no doctor. So from me it was not medical assistance she was looking for at least not directly. What Maitri wanted was my bone marrow. You see the best chance anyone suffering from Leukemia has is to receive a bone marrow transplant. And while there are more than 8 million bone marrow donors registered in the United State it’s nowhere near enough. With very specific genetic requirements an exact match for a bone marrow donor is very hard to come by.
“It’s easiest to find a genetic match with someone who’s related to you and secondarily of the same ethnic background, etc,” Maitri said. “And 70 percent of people cannot find a match within their own family. So they need to find an unrelated donor and unfortunately only about 4 out 10 people that are looking for an unrelated donor actually do.”
Hearing this it didn’t take much to convince me that it would be worth it to register as a bone marrow donor. And though I was not a good match for Maitri’s friend someone somewhere out there may one day need my help. Fortunately her friend’s husband found a match. He’s undergoing treatment. But the plight others who might not be so lucky got me thinking.
Less than a week after signing up for the national bone marrow donor registry, I reconnected with another friend named Shannon Foley. She’s the executive director of an organization called Love Hope Strength.
“Tell us what your organization is and what it does,” I asked Shannon in an interview.
“We are I guess the one and only, therefore the largest, rock n roll cancer foundation,” she said. “And we started about 3 and half years ago. And we travel the world, putting on concerts in order to raise money to build cancer centers in regions of the world that have no access to cancer care. And here in the United States, we go to concerts and we find matches for people in need of bone marrow transplants. So we swab peoples’ cheeks It’s a very simple process. We wave to processing fee, which is normally $65. And we get you registered to see if you can be the match to a patient with leukemia, sickle-cell anemia, any kind of blood disorders, blood cancers.”
In the summer of 2009 Shannon and her team at Love Hope Strength managed to register 4,000 new bone marrow donors to the national database. So far this year they’ve matched 30 cancer patie...]]>
James Edward Mills clean 14:34 2748
The Open Road - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-open-road/ Wed, 17 Feb 2010 18:40:17 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2614 http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-open-road/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-open-road/feed/ 0 An interview with Time Magazine reporter and author Pico Iyer From a very young age  Pico Iyer has had a close personal relationship with one of the worlds great spiritual and political leaders. In 1960 his father a professor of philosophy and a student of world religions was among first westerners to seek an audience […] An interview with Time Magazine reporter and author Pico Iyer From a very young age  Pico Iyer has had a close personal relationship with one of the worlds great spiritual and political leaders. In 1960 his father a professor of philosophy and a studen... From a very young age  Pico Iyer has had a close personal relationship with one of the worlds great spiritual and political leaders. In 1960 his father a professor of philosophy and a student of world religions was among first westerners to seek an audience with the Dalai Lama.  Traveling from his home in England Iyer’s father journeyed  back to his native India to meet the Dalai Lama then around the age of 24.  In their conversations the Tibetan Buddhist ruler in exile and Iyer’s father discussed ancient mystic wisdom that had been unavailable to the outside world for centuries. And with the exchange of a single simple gift, they also established a connection between the Dalai Lama and Iyer that now spans almost 50 years.

“At the end of his conversation with the Dalai Lama in 1960 he said ‘I have this little three year-old boy back in England and he was already quite interested in the story of your dramatic flight from Tibet into India’,” Iyer said.  “And so the Dalai Lama, with his great gift for the perfect gesture found a photo of himself when he was 5 years old and sent it to me. And so from the time I was three I had this photo of this little boy, 5 years old, already ruling 6 million people. I didn’t understand who or what the Dalai Lama was. But I could make a contact with this little boy sitting in this place. And I could see all the responsibility he had. So in that sense I grew up with the image of the Dalai Lama and stories of the Dalai Lama from the time I was a little boy.”
From the gift of that photograph to their first meeting years later Iyer and the Dalai Lama have been become good friends. And through the course of his career as a journalist Iyer has cultivated a deep insight to the philosophy that has guided the Dalai Lama toward a peaceful resolution of the conflict between China and Tibet. In his new book The Open Road: The Global Journey of the 14th Dalai Lama Iyer shares his view of the spiritual and political path we all take to find peace in our lives and the world in which we live.

Music by Jake Shimabukru
This recording from season 1 of the Joy Trip Project was originally brought to you thank to a generous grant from KEEN Footwear. Also thanks to our current sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them. Find links to their web sites on ours at JoyTripProject.com


Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to  clean 2614
Take A Seat - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/take-a-seat-2/ Tue, 16 Feb 2010 14:00:14 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2587 http://joytripproject.com/2010/take-a-seat-2/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/take-a-seat-2/feed/ 0 An interview with adventure filmmaker Dominic Gill I don’t know about you. But I’ve got a hard time getting motivated, especially when it comes to doing something hard, something that might take a lot of time, cost a bit of money or might even be a little scary. Life’s journey can be tough enough just […] An interview with adventure filmmaker Dominic Gill I don’t know about you. But I’ve got a hard time getting motivated, especially when it comes to doing something hard, something that might take a lot of time, I don’t know about you. But I’ve got a hard time getting motivated, especially when it comes to doing something hard, something that might take a lot of time, cost a bit of money or might even be a little scary. Life’s journey can be tough enough just trying to get by making it from day to the next. But every once in a while, someone comes along that prompts you to action. They get you psyched up and excited because you can see they’re going places and the next thing you know you get swept up in the momentum and just like your own life’s journey heads in a whole new direction. You follow that person right down a new road of adventure. Last fall I met a guy just like that.
Dominic Gill was one a one of a few dozen movie producers I met during the 2009 Banff Film Festival. His documentary called Take A Seat follows his two-year journey by tandem bicycle over 20,000 mile of open road. Asking total strangers to pedal behind him on what his calls the stoker seat his travels brought a fresh sense of adventure into hearts and minds of everyone he met or who tagged along for the ride.


Music this week by the band Trees On Fire

Special thanks to the New Belgium Brewing Company for underwriting travel expenses to Banff that made this podcast possible. Also thanks to our sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to info@Joy Trip Project.com.
Share your stories. share your passion for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friends. Until next time take care.
]]> James Edward Mills clean 2587 Winter Biking - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/winter-biking/ Fri, 12 Feb 2010 14:00:55 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2569 http://joytripproject.com/2010/winter-biking/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/winter-biking/feed/ 2 Even though temperatures across the country are still well below freezing there are still plenty of people out there riding their bikes through the winter. On this blustery day in Madison Wisconsin a small class of avid bikers have gathered together to learn the finer points of riding around town in some pretty rough road […] Even though temperatures across the country are still well below freezing there are still plenty of people out there riding their bikes through the winter. On this blustery day in Madison Wisconsin a small class of avid bikers have gathered together to... Even though temperatures across the country are still well below freezing there are still plenty of people out there riding their bikes through the winter. On this blustery day in Madison Wisconsin a small class of avid bikers have gathered together to learn the finer points of riding around town in some pretty rough road conditions

Dwyer:
So on one of the hills practice unweighting your seat a little bit and see if you can pedal standing up a little bit, maybe practice how that feels to change it up. So lighten your seat, you might feel the rear wheel. Yeah that it! Great! Just to get the feel for that.
James_002
The students practice making tight turns in a circle. All bundled up in cold weather clothing they plow their bicycles through snow some would hate to drive a car. Angie Lauersdorf is a stay-at-home mom who wants to ride her bike year-round.
Lauersdorf _001
I normally road bike. I started about two years go. And I just really enjoy it. I used to do it pretty much every day and I was missing biking. So I wanted to get out in the winter and do it in snow.
James_003
But before Lauersdorf set out on her bike into the snow. She and the other members of  Viola and Allie Dwyer offer specialized classes in bike maintenance through a training program called We All Mechanics. But on this day Viola said the class is all about bike safety while riding through the winter.
Viloa_001>>
It seems that a lot of people like the idea of winter biking, but don’t now how to start. And so our classes try to have an access point for people with the mechanical side of things, while clinics like this are an access point for people just with general biking skills. So if you’ve never biked out in the winter, but always thought it would be a fun thing to do, this is a really supported way to do it.
James_004>>
The clinic provided handy tips on winter riding. The students learned bike maintenance, the importance proper lubrication of the chain and gear mechanisms, the inspection of brakes.
Viloa_003>
And then temperature regulation can be hard. It’s easy to over heat and get cold and over heat and get cold and so figuring out what types of layers you can wear so you can peel some off along the way. Or do you have to start off cold? That kind of thing. Just getting comfortable with the elements and getting used to the range of normal comfort and what you just have to sort of put up with.
James-005>
Some might suggest that there’s nothing normal about winter biking. Viola’s co-instructor Allie Dwyer let’s her students know that riding through ice and snow is about a lot more than just staying warm
Dwyer_001>>
A big, big deal is having ice tires. So whether or not you feel like investing in both maybe just one, the front ice tire is very important. It’s got studs in it so it makes it very easy to go across ice.
James_006>
And of course there are other vehicles to consider.
Dwyer_002>>
Another big important thing is being visible.  So lot of lights, a rear light and a front light for sure.  Lots of reflective clothing is really going to let you be seen by other cyclists and motorists if you’re out on the same roads that motorists are driving on.
Fade up sound of vehicles:
Even though the price of gasoline has come down dramatically since the beginning of winter, there will always be those like Angie Lauersdorf who prefer bikes to cars.
Lauersdorf _002
For me it’s fun. I mean I really enjoy being out and I…just being outside. You know the wind when you’re biking in your face and just nature kind of. Just being out there is the big thing about biking or the thing I enjoy most.
For the Joy Trip Project this is James Mills.
Thanks to our sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc,  clean 2569
Environmental Justice - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/environmental-justice/ Tue, 09 Feb 2010 13:18:01 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2551 http://joytripproject.com/2010/environmental-justice/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2010/environmental-justice/feed/ 0 An interview with Peggy Shepard executive director of West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. Racism is a word that seldom comes up in a discussion of environmental protection. Clean air, water and soil are universal human values that transcend ethnic identity or the color of one’s skin. But in metropolitan centers around the United States minority […] An interview with Peggy Shepard executive director of West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. Racism is a word that seldom comes up in a discussion of environmental protection. Clean air, water and soil are universal human values that transcend ethnic id...
Racism is a word that seldom comes up in a discussion of environmental protection. Clean air, water and soil are universal human values that transcend ethnic identity or the color of one’s skin. But in metropolitan centers around the United States minority communities are being inundated with a disproportionate burden of pollution. Industrial waste, municipal garbage and sewage treatment plants are routinely deposited in areas predominately populated by low income African Americans and Hispanics.
In 1988 a community organizer named Peggy Shepard was asked to help address concerns around the creation of one such sewage treatment plant. A facility built in the New York City burrow of Harlem.
” It’s interesting how you can walk by things everyday or they can be in your community and it just never registers what they are,” Shepard said. “And so we began to organize around getting people jobs there because we thought that was the issue. But once it fully began operating we realized that emissions and odors were making people sick. And we began an eight-year organizing campaign to get the city to fix the plant and we were successful.”
By bringing people in the community together Shepherd’s organization compelled the City of New York to commit $55 million to clean up the facility. They were also successful in creating environmental safety policies that would prevent further contamination at this and other sites in the future. With a lawsuit settlement of $1.1million Shepherd create a new organization called West Harlem Environmental Action Inc. And today known as WEACT the group fights to prevent minority communities from suffering illness and premature death due to acts of environmental injustice.
“When we look at the glaring health disparities that we have between communities you’ve got to wonder about the contributing factors to that illness and excess mortality,” Shepard said. “And we believe that it’s housing conditions and the desperate burden of pollution.”
For those of us who care deeply about protecting the environment we should take a real close around at the world in which live. Clean air, water and soil aren’t only at risk in the distant wild and scenic places of our national parks, but in the spaces where we work, play and make our homes. And in these places segments of our society, often still segregated by race are being unfairly targeted with more than their share of our pollution. We’re not just talking about environmental protection. The issue now is environmental justice. In this edition of the Joy Trip Project we talk to Peggy Shepard the executive director of West Harlem Environmental Action Inc.
Music this week by Brett Dennen

Thanks to our sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.


Thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast help spread the word by posting a link to it on your Facebook page. Or send it as a tweet to your followers on Twitter. Social media is vibrant exchange of ideas join the conversation by becoming engage. Post your comments the Joy Trip Project blog or send us an email to  clean 16:21 2551 The Season - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-season/ Mon, 01 Feb 2010 06:00:09 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2483 http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-season/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2010/the-season/feed/ 3 An interview with adventure filmmaker Bryan Smith It’s been more than a month since the last podcast. Thanks to everyone for all the emails and Facebook messages asking for the next edition. After an action packed first season of production, the realities of life came crashing down like a devastating wave. The recession of 2009 […] An interview with adventure filmmaker Bryan Smith It’s been more than a month since the last podcast. Thanks to everyone for all the emails and Facebook messages asking for the next edition. After an action packed first season of production,
It’s been more than a month since the last podcast. Thanks to everyone for all the emails and Facebook messages asking for the next edition. After an action packed first season of production, the realities of life came crashing down like a devastating wave. The recession of 2009 made times a bit tough. Simply put the project was placed indefinite hold while I scrambled together a few odd writing jobs through the end of December and all of January. I had to work to make enough cash to pay our property tax bill. I’m happy to say that I recently wrote a fat check to city of Madison and now the project is back on track.
I’ve learned a lot through that first season. With the collapse of traditional media, as newspapers and magazine continue to fold up under the weight of an antiquated model of communication, I’ve discovered that this form of storytelling, sharing music, art and adventure online is the wave of the future. With many creative souls out there building new high quality content for Internet there’s no shortage of great stories to tell. If you’ve been following along on the blog and on Facebook, you’ll know that I’ve been more than a little busy still traveling and finding new subjects to share with you. And in the process I’ve become thoroughly inspired by the work of many others who are pushing the boundaries of creative expression as they explore the heights and depths of the human spirit.
You’ve heard me mention my friend
Fitz Cahall. He’s the creator of my favorite podcast The Dirtbag Diaries. Fitz has new project that recently posted the Internet, a series of short films that depict the lives of adventurers chasing their passion through course of a year, a season.
I connected with Fitz toward the end of last year during the Banff Mountain Film Festival. There I saw the premiere edition of the 22 part film series The Season. It’s an exciting yet, moderately paced thoughtful contemplation on what motivates ordinary people who do exceptional things in the outdoors. At the Banff Centre for mountain culture, in Alberta Canada, I also met Fitz’s partner co-producer and director of the Season Bryan Smith.
Produced exclusively for distribution online, the Season brings Internet adventure storytelling to a new level. Directed by Bryan Smith this new film series illustrates the narrative behind the lives of people like each of us who aspire to lead a rich live in adventure.

The Season Trailer from Fitz Cahall on Vimeo.

The Season produced by Bryan Smith and Fitz Cahall premieres online at www.theseasontv.com.
Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro.
Special thanks to the New Belgium Brewing Company for underwriting travel expenses to Banff that made this podcast possible. Also thanks to our sponsors, Recreational Equipment Inc, REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.
clean 13:59 2483 Dog Sledding the U.P. - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/dog-sledding-the-u-p/ Fri, 18 Dec 2009 18:00:04 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2225 http://joytripproject.com/2009/dog-sledding-the-u-p/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/dog-sledding-the-u-p/feed/ 6 Now that winter is here it’s a good opportunity to discover that despite the cold there were many opportunities to enjoy your time outside. Hopefully you get out to ski or ice climb or skate or make angles in the snow.  By far one of the coolest moments I had last winter was the better […] Now that winter is here it’s a good opportunity to discover that despite the cold there were many opportunities to enjoy your time outside. Hopefully you get out to ski or ice climb or skate or make angles in the snow. Now that winter is here it’s a good opportunity to discover that despite the cold there were many opportunities to enjoy your time outside. Hopefully you get out to ski or ice climb or skate or make angles in the snow.  By far one of the coolest moments I had last winter was the better part of a morning I spent riding through the woods of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan on a dog sled. I’m not sure what I expected but I can tell you that it was nothing like anything I could have imagined.



It was one of those days in winter when the overcast sky ironically blocks out the sun’s rays but still traps the ambient heat of the air. There was no wind. So the temperature was a pure 20 degrees. Everything, the sky, the leafless trees, the ground packed in ice and snow seemed cast in monochromatic shades of black, gray and white. Most every aspect of the landscape was utterly still.



But piercing the silence came the sound of barking dogs. Not the least bit disturbing, the noise the dogs made seemed a natural part of this particular environment, like a pack of wolves answer the call the of wild.
Each of the dogs yipped and yelped their excitement because as I came to discover pulling a sled in flashes of fangs, claws and muscle along these frozen trails is exactly what they were born to do. I would find that riding a dog sled is as thrilling and natural an experience as you can have.
Music this week provided
The Conductive Alliance



This podcast is brought to you thanks to the generous support of Travel Michigan who provided transportation and lodging assistance to make this joy trip possible. Learn more about other travel opportunities throughout the mitten state at www.Michigan.org
]]> James Edward Mills clean 12:27 2225 Majora Carter - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/majora-carter/ Fri, 11 Dec 2009 18:00:35 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2167 http://joytripproject.com/2009/majora-carter/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/majora-carter/feed/ 4 An interview with urban revitalization strategist Majora Carter JTP: Delegates from about 190 countries are gathering over the next two weeks at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Although this is a landmark event, the largest meeting ever to discuss the environmental future of our planet. I’m a little concerned that we may […] An interview with urban revitalization strategist Majora Carter JTP: Delegates from about 190 countries are gathering over the next two weeks at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Although this is a landmark event, An interview with urban
revitalization strategist Majora Carter
JTP:
Delegates from about 190 countries are gathering over the next two weeks at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. Although this is a landmark event, the largest meeting ever to discuss the environmental future of our planet. I’m a little concerned that we may not be talking about the most important issues.
The other night on NPR David Kestenbaum reported on the first day of the conference. In his report on All Things Considered he said everyone pretty much agrees that we have to do something about climate change. But how I see it where the problem lies is that the delegates also seem to share the same disagreements
NPR:
In fact most of the disagreements, they’re all about money. Developing countries like Bolivia are arguing “Hey The global warming problem? you in the developed world made it. So to solve it you’re going to have to give us money to adapt and to keep our emissions down as we grow.
JTP:
The industrial growth that caused the climate change crisis in the first place will apparently continue. You see it seems that the Copenhagen delegates are really only arguing about who gets to continue to pollute the atmosphere with carbon gas emissions and how much. The conversation so far seems to be relegated to trading carbon credits for cash so the developing world can continue to build factories and produce consumer goods. But at what cost? What about the environment? And what about millions of disenfranchised people in the U.S. and around the world that will be most directly impacted as our planet’s climate continues to change in the wake of human progress?
I won’t be attending the conference in Copenhagen. But a few weeks ago I did attend the Breaking the Color Barrier to the Great Outdoors conference in Atlanta. A few hundred African American Environmentalist gathered to talk among other things about the role people of color can play in protecting the natural world. There I met Majora Carter, the 2005 winner of the MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant. She received $500,000 to developed her ideas on creating sustainable urban communities. And while we didn’t talk about Copenhagen in particular Carter has a rather unique perspective how best to curb some of the social effects of Climate Change.
Carter:
The McArthur Foundation dubbed me an urban revitalization strategist. Which I love, because of the work that I did around pioneering one of the first green jobs training systems in the country, really doing community based, led project development in one of the poorest congressional districts in the country that’s also one of the most environmentally challenged. And the idea was that you can do development that met both the environmental as well as economic needs of a very poor communities and give them the tools they need to enjoy it and be a part of its development.
JTP:
The environmental issues that our planet faces aren’t limited to carbon emissions. Though green houses gases are indeed the primary cause of global warming it’s the institutions and practices of human behavior that create them. Carter believes that we need to develop community based initiatives that produce green jobs and allow ordinary people take an active part in the cessation carbon emitting industries.     In order to make lasting change in the fight again climate change we have to rethink how we develop and live in...]]>
James Edward Mills clean 13:01 2167
Jeremy Collins - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/jeremy-collins/ Fri, 04 Dec 2009 18:00:48 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2104 http://joytripproject.com/2009/jeremy-collins/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/jeremy-collins/feed/ 0 An interview with climber/artist Jeremy Collins There’s a point in the human experience when thought, emotion and action combine. It’s at that moment when we create a unique expression of utter and sublime beauty. Share it with others and it becomes art. In the world of adventure, on high mountain peaks or across vast tracts […] An interview with climber/artist Jeremy Collins There’s a point in the human experience when thought, emotion and action combine. It’s at that moment when we create a unique expression of utter and sublime beauty. There’s a point in the human experience when thought, emotion and action combine. It’s at that moment when we create a unique expression of utter and sublime beauty. Share it with others and it becomes art. In the world of adventure, on high mountain peaks or across vast tracts of rocky desert, art takes the form of photography, filmmaking, poetry and literature.
But in the hands of Jeremy Collins, a self-described climber artist, the thoughts, emotions and actions of climbing combine to become breathtaking paintings, drawing and illustrations. A rare and emerging talent in the world of adventure art, Jeremy is a frequent contributor to magazines and books. He also creates prints for commercial distribution. In this video edition of the Joy Trip Project Jeremy shares the story behind his passion for the outdoors and inspires those who see his work to follow along on the journey.

New music this weeks by Sufjan Stevens and Jake Shimabukro.
The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. and Patagonia. We don’t take many from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.
Thanks for listening. But y we want to hear from YOU! Please drops us message by email at info@joytripproject.com. Or find us on Facebook. Share your pictures, your stories, share your passions for outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving, and practices of sustainable living. You just might inspire our next Joy Trip together. But most of all don’t forget to tell your friend! Until next time, take care.
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Freedom to Roam - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/freedom-to-roam/ Sat, 28 Nov 2009 01:36:48 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=2062 http://joytripproject.com/2009/freedom-to-roam/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/freedom-to-roam/feed/ 4 An interview with Rick Ridgeway In 1978 Rick Ridgeway was on the first American team to reach the summit of K2, the second highest mountain in the world. After a long career as a professional adventurer Ridgeway is now vice president of environmental initiatives at the outdoor clothing company Patagonia. Today he’s devoting his life […] An interview with Rick Ridgeway In 1978 Rick Ridgeway was on the first American team to reach the summit of K2, the second highest mountain in the world. After a long career as a professional adventurer Ridgeway is now vice president of environmental i... In 1978 Rick Ridgeway was on the first American team to reach the summit of K2, the second highest mountain in the world. After a long career as a professional adventurer Ridgeway is now vice president of environmental initiatives at the outdoor clothing company Patagonia. Today he’s devoting his life to the preservation of wildlife corridors across North America. Working with a coalition of environmental protection groups and major corporations Ridgeway is helping to establish and maintain clear pathways that allow animal species to travel freely from one habitat to another. Called Freedom To Roam this program aims to raise awareness for the importance of wildlife protection by telling the stories of the animals themselves.
Like humans animals have the same inherent need to move from place to place. Species such as caribou, wolves, elk and mountain lions traverse the landscape traveling hundreds of miles between grounds used for breading, hunting or grazing. And in some cases just like humans, to simply live out their lives in the joyful pursuit of happiness. But in our rush to develop and civilize the natural world human beings are disrupting wildlife corridors through which these animals pass from one habitat to the next. And in the process we’re putting at risk our own future on the planet. In this edition of the Joy Trip Project environmental activist Rick Ridgeway shares the story behind his work to protect these passageways while defending our Freedom to Roam.

Music this week by Sly Joe and the Smooth Operators
The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take many from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

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James Edward Mills clean 15:51 2062
A life well lived - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/a-life-well-lived/ Wed, 18 Nov 2009 21:14:04 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1925 http://joytripproject.com/2009/a-life-well-lived/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/a-life-well-lived/feed/ 2 A Joy Trip Flashback: Remembering Todd Skinner I got an email from an old friend, Amy Skinner.We hadn’t connected in a while so it really good to hear from her. Her message read, “Thought you might get a kick out of my son’s third grade writing assignment. We’re going to have to have a little […] A Joy Trip Flashback: Remembering Todd Skinner I got an email from an old friend, Amy Skinner.We hadn’t connected in a while so it really good to hear from her. Her message read, “Thought you might get a kick out of my son’s third grade writing assignm... I got an email from an old friend, Amy Skinner.We hadn’t connected in a while so it really good to hear from her. Her message read, “Thought you might get a kick out of my son’s third grade writing assignment. We’re going to have to have a little talk about plagiarism, but it’s apparent that he has listened to your podcast many times.  I have it on my ipod and he loves to listen to it.”
In the body of the message Amy included a scanned image of her son Jake’s writing assignment. Written in pencil on wide ruled paper, the little boy liberally quoted without attribution from a story I produced in 2006. I have to say I didn’t mind at all. In fact I was touched to point where I was almost brought to tears, because Jake’s writing assignment quoted from the story I produced on his father’s memorial service.
They say that imitation is the sincerest from of flattery. Jake’s use of my words from this story let me know that in a small way I’ve helped him to remember his father. Todd Skinner was a good friend and three years after his death many people still remember him and what he meant to the outdoor community. And just so we don’t forget in this special edition of the podcast I’m bringing you a Joy Trip flashback, a celebration of a life well lived.

Music by the band Hot Buttered Rum and Jake Shimabukuro.

This podcast was originally produced in 2006 for the outdoor industry online trade magazine Specialty News, also know as SNEWS find them online at www.SNEWSnet.com

The Joy Trip Project is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take many from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.
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Secrets of Shangri-La - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/1837/ Sun, 15 Nov 2009 18:49:54 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1837 http://joytripproject.com/2009/1837/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/1837/feed/ 2 An interview with mountaineer Peter Athans We’ve explored much of the modern world. Today very little is left to tempt the imagination. We’ve succeeded in climbing the highest mountains. We’ve traveled to the depths of the ocean. There’s not much of our planet that we haven’t seen. It would seem then now that what remains […] An interview with mountaineer Peter Athans We’ve explored much of the modern world. Today very little is left to tempt the imagination. We’ve succeeded in climbing the highest mountains. We’ve traveled to the depths of the ocean.
We’ve explored much of the modern world. Today very little is left to tempt the imagination. We’ve succeeded in climbing the highest mountains. We’ve traveled to the depths of the ocean. There’s not much of our planet that we haven’t seen. It would seem then now that what remains of adventure, at least on earth, isn’t to discover where human beings have yet to go but instead where we’ve been.
A new film by produced in cooperation PBS and National Geographic takes a look at the discovery and exploration of an ancient civilization. The new film The Secrets of Shangri-La: Quest for Secret Caves premiered at the 2009 Banff Mountain Film Festival.  In this edition of The Joy Trip Project producer and professional mountain guide Peter Athans takes us on an amazing journey to reveal the great mysteries of a long-ago culture once forgotten.
New music this week by Chad Farran from his album Another Ride. Find his online at www.chadfarran.com.
This podcast is brought to you thank to generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. Special thanks to the New Belgium Brewing Company for underwriting in part travel expenses to Banff to make this edition possible. We don’t take money from just anyone. Sponsors of the Joy Trip Project support our mission of an active lifestyle through outdoor recreation and community involvement. Support us by supporting them.

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James Edward Mills clean 11:33 1837
Beyond the mountain - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/beyond-the-mountain/ Fri, 06 Nov 2009 22:15:05 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1704 http://joytripproject.com/2009/beyond-the-mountain/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/beyond-the-mountain/feed/ 0 An interview with Banff Mountain Literature Award winner Steve House Leading alpinist Reinhold Messner once called Steve House “the best high altitude climber in the world today.” That’s no small praise coming from the first man to solo the summit of Everest without oxygen. In his late 30s House has had a distinguished career ascending […] An interview with Banff Mountain Literature Award winner Steve House Leading alpinist Reinhold Messner once called Steve House “the best high altitude climber in the world today.” That’s no small praise coming from the first man to solo the summit of E... Steve House

Leading alpinist Reinhold Messner once called Steve House “the best high altitude climber in the world today.” That’s no small praise coming from the first man to solo the summit of Everest without oxygen.
In his late 30s House has had a distinguished career ascending the most challenging routes on many of the highest mountains in the world. Just after the release of his new memoir Beyond the Mountain House shared his thoughts on his earliest days in the sport.
“The real turning point for me in my climbing career, and I talk about this in the book, and I think it was an important moment for me,” House said. “I decided after high school to take a year and do a student exchange. And got sent to Yugoslavia.”
Originally House I had hoped to go to France. Instead he spent a year in the mountain region once known as Slovenia.
“I was there for a couple of months, super board! As a kid I didn’t understand the language having a really a hard time making friends. And climbing was my deliverance from all that,” he said. “You don’t need to communicate that much with language when you’re going climbing with somebody. I found and joined a climbing club there and I wound up dropping out of school and spent that whole summer climbing.”
House said that it was at this point when for him the hook for climbing was set. He’d go one to earn an ecology degree from Evergreen State University in Olympia Washington and from there he’d become a professional mountain guide, leading expeditions and climbing solo while pushing the boundaries of high altitude adventure.
In this edition of The Joy Trip Project Steve House tells the story behind his award winning book.
Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro from the album Dragon. Find him online at: www.jakeshimabukuro.com
The Joy Trip Project is brought to thanks to the generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Supporters of this podcast share our mission of better living through an active healthy lifestyle in balance with nature and the communities in which we live. Special thanks this week to New Belgium Brewing Company for underwriting travel expenses during The 2009 Banff Mountain Film Festival.


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James Edward Mills 11:41 1704
Chicks Rock - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/chicks-rock/ Fri, 30 Oct 2009 22:49:02 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1603 http://joytripproject.com/2009/chicks-rock/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/chicks-rock/feed/ 0 Empowered women like Kim Reynolds call themselves what they like. This Chick runs a business out of Colorado showing other women how to climb rock and ice called Chicks Rock. “It’s fun. I think sharing life experiences, climbing experiences, there’s a certain comradery,” Reynolds said. ” Someone might have the same challenges or same talents […] Empowered women like Kim Reynolds call themselves what they like. This Chick runs a business out of Colorado showing other women how to climb rock and ice called Chicks Rock. “It’s fun. I think sharing life experiences, climbing experiences, Empowered women like Kim Reynolds call themselves what they like. This Chick runs a business out of Colorado showing other women how to climb rock and ice called Chicks Rock.
“It’s fun. I think sharing life experiences, climbing experiences, there’s a certain comradery,” Reynolds said. ” Someone might have the same challenges or same talents or whatever as I as do and it’s nice to experience that with other women.”
A few weeks ago Kim, a certified mountain guide and life coach, lead a small group of women on a rock climbing trip to a local crag about 40 miles north of Madison, Wisconsin,  a spot called Devil’s Lake. I only came out for the day to take pictures and ask a few questions. Because on this trip there were no men allowed.
“I think men are fun. I don’t want to leave them out, but there’s also a trend toward more and more women’s trips I think,” Reynolds said. “And women wanting to do things with other women and learn from other women and have that opportunity.”
In the world of adventure women are busting out on their own. They’re leaving husbands, boyfriends and children at home to discover their strengths and celebrate the feminine side of the wild. Hear their story in this edition of The Joy Trip Project.
New music this week by:


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James Edward Mills clean 10:38 1603
350. org - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/350-org/ Sun, 25 Oct 2009 16:42:16 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1515 http://joytripproject.com/2009/350-org/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/350-org/feed/ 4 If you’ve been watching television or checking your favorite web sites lately, you’ve noticed one number keeps popping up. On October 24rd in particular people around the world have been plastering the number 350 on billboards, marching with it on signs and performing physical stunts to share this number with as many people as possible. […] If you’ve been watching television or checking your favorite web sites lately, you’ve noticed one number keeps popping up. On October 24rd in particular people around the world have been plastering the number 350 on billboards, If you’ve been watching television or checking your favorite web sites lately, you’ve noticed one number keeps popping up. On October 24rd in particular people around the world have been plastering the number 350 on billboards, marching with it on signs and performing physical stunts to share this number with as many people as possible. Groups numbering in the thousands have gathered across the U.S. and in many countries to spell out 350 on surfaces from grassy fields, to mountain summits, to the open ocean. Writer and environmental activist Bill McKibben says 350 is a number we all need to be aware of.
“It’s the most important number in the world. It’s the amount of carbon, that’s measured in parts per million, that the scientists now say is the most we can have in the atmosphere and maintain the civilization that we now enjoy,” McKibben said. “We’re past that number already. We need to get back to it. That’s why the stakes are so urgent.”

Back in 1988 McKibben made one of the earliest cases outlining the modern crisis known now as global warming. His book “The End of Nature,” chronicled the research that followed the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to human activity and the resulting temperature increase around the world. Today this climate change threatens life on our planet putting at risk every plant and animal species including human beings.
As CO2 levels exceed 350 parts per million McKibben warns that we have past the point where we can do nothing and not face dire consequences. Through a program called 350.org he aims to lead an international movement to raise awareness for the plight of global warming and what individuals, institutions and governments can do the stop it.
Music this week by The Ahn Trio from the album Lullaby For My Favorite Insomniac . Find their playlist and a schedule of upcoming shows online at www.AhnTrio.com.
The Joy Trip Project is brought to thanks to the generous support of our sponsors Recreational Equipment Inc. REI and Patagonia. We don’t take money from just anyone. Supporters of this podcast share our mission of better living through an active healthy lifestyle in balance with nature and the communities in which we live. You can support us by supporting them. Visit their websites:

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James Edward Mills clean 8:38 1515
Playful creativity - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/playful-creativity/ Thu, 15 Oct 2009 19:19:06 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1429 http://joytripproject.com/2009/playful-creativity/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/playful-creativity/feed/ 0 There’s a good chance that you’re one of those creative types. I’ll bet you’re the kind of person who derives a great deal of satisfaction from what you can make or do with your hands. You might play an instrument or you draw or maybe you like sing. And sometimes while you’re cooking I imagine […] There’s a good chance that you’re one of those creative types. I’ll bet you’re the kind of person who derives a great deal of satisfaction from what you can make or do with your hands. You might play an instrument or you draw or maybe you like sing. There’s a good chance that you’re one of those creative types. I’ll bet you’re the kind of person who derives a great deal of satisfaction from what you can make or do with your hands. You might play an instrument or you draw or maybe you like sing. And sometimes while you’re cooking I imagine you’ve been known to dance a little to the music on your CD player while you stir a pot of spaghetti sauce.
And if don’t have one those jobs where paint, design clothes or build models, or even if you do in spare time you probably like to hike or climb or maybe mountain bike. All these are the many things we do express ourselves, how we perform to show the world who we really are.
Knowing how to express yourself is an incredible gift and a talent Carr Hagerman learned to develop at early age.When he was 14 Carr started working as a street performer at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival. Using improvisational comedy and a host of characters he played off the energy of the crowds he entertained to create something special out of nothing but human interaction.
Today Hagerman is the creative director for Ontend Creative Partners, a corporate consultation firm, and he uses his experiences as street performer to change how people in the professional world think about the whimsical spirit of playful creativity. He’s also the co-author of the book “Top Performer: A bold approach to sales and service.” I had the pleasure of meeting Hagerman a few months ago at the Outdoor Retailers Summer Market in Salt Lake City Utah. In this interview he shares some pretty amazing ideas on the serious business of play.
Music this week by Cirque Du Soleil is from the album and show Alegria.
The Joy Trip Project is brought to thanks to generous support of our sponsors

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James Edward Mills clean 10:22 1429
Diane Van Deren - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/diane-van-deren/ Mon, 05 Oct 2009 15:03:38 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1383 http://joytripproject.com/2009/diane-van-deren/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/diane-van-deren/feed/ 1 An interview with ultra-distance runner Diane Van Deren It’s been my pleasure to interview some of the best endurance athletes in world. I’ve spoken to high altitude climbers like Conrad Anker and Ed Viesturs, extreme skiers like Scott Schimdt and ultra marathon runners like Tim Twietmeyer and Dean Karnazes. These men are incredibly tough individuals.  […] An interview with ultra-distance runner Diane Van Deren It’s been my pleasure to interview some of the best endurance athletes in world. I’ve spoken to high altitude climbers like Conrad Anker and Ed Viesturs, It’s been my pleasure to interview some of the best endurance athletes in world. I’ve spoken to high altitude climbers like Conrad Anker and Ed Viesturs, extreme skiers like Scott Schimdt and ultra marathon runners like Tim Twietmeyer and Dean Karnazes. These men are incredibly tough individuals.  And with humility and grace all have made their mark on the world by pushing their bodies past the breaking point to achieve amazing feats of strength against incredible odds. But I have to tell you that one of the most inspiring stories I’ve ever heard is that of a woman named Diane Van Deren.
Diane is consistently among the top finishers in some of the most rugged and challenging long distance trail running events in the world. She most recently completed the Yukon Arctic Ultra, a 430 mile unsupported race in Alaska along the dogsled route of the Iditarod. As she ran in temperatures 40 degrees below zero, Diane hauled over  50 pounds of food and equipment behind her in a sled.
But what’s more impressive to me is that this wife and mother of three accomplished this and most of her career highlights after a long and painful battle with epilepsy. This 2007 interview with Diane Van Deren first ran on the outdoor industry podcast SNEWS-Live. Two years later Diane is still going strong and is now traveling the country on a speaking tour. In advance of her appearance here in Madison, I’m rerunning our conversation to share with you her amazing journey.
Diane will be speaking in Madison, Wisconsin  on October 7th at the Orpheum Theater at 7PM. For Tickets visit: http://thenorthface.inticketing.com/events/45213/DIANE-VAN-DEREN-KARINA-HOLLEKIM–Beyond-the-Edge-Risk-R-
New music this week by Sly Joe & the Smooth Operators comes courtesy of the podsafe music network
For more information on the treatment of spinal cord and brain injuries at Craig Hospital visit www.craighospital.org.
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James Edward Mills clean 14:56 1383
The Buffalo Soldiers - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-buffalo-soldiers/ Sun, 27 Sep 2009 03:43:00 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1329 http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-buffalo-soldiers/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-buffalo-soldiers/feed/ 9 Back in January of 2009 I had the pleasure of speaking to Ken Burns. He sat with me for an interview about his documentary film “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea.” A program that first aired last year on PBS television stations nation wide this five-part series reveals in stunning detail some amazing historical facts. But […] Back in January of 2009 I had the pleasure of speaking to Ken Burns. He sat with me for an interview about his documentary film “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea.” A program that first aired last year on PBS television stations nation wide this ...

Back in January of 2009 I had the pleasure of speaking to Ken Burns. He sat with me for an interview about his documentary film “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea.” A program that first aired last year on PBS television stations nation wide this five-part series reveals in stunning detail some amazing historical facts. But what came out of that conversation was an awareness for the role people of color played in the creation of my favorite wild and scenic places.
At the turn of 20th century more than 400 members of the 9th and 10th Divisions of the U.S. Cavalry, African-Americans know as the Buffalo Soldiers, actively patrolled the newly designated National Parks of Yellowstone, Yosemite and Sequoia. These men performed many of the same duties tasked today to the National Park Service. The Buffalo Soldiers were in effect among the world’s first park rangers.
But over the last 100 years African-Americans and other minority groups have had few opportunities to visit the National Parks. Practices of racial discrimination and
institutional segregation restricted most people of color to cities across America. And even after the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s made it possible for minorities to roam freely throughout the county, persistent memory of past injustices and the loss of outdoor recreation traditions had made full integration of our National Parks difficult to this day.
How ironic it is that so few African-Americans visit the very parks their ancestors helped to create. This  piece produced for the Public Radio International program To The Best of Our Knowledge tell the history of the Buffalo Soldiers and shares the meaning behind their enduring legacy.

Many thanks to Recreational Equipment Inc. for their support in the production of this story.


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James Edward Mills clean 12:27 1329
2010 Wisconsin Ironman: Training Day One - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/2010-wisconsin-ironman-training-day-one/ Tue, 15 Sep 2009 16:42:55 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=1209 http://joytripproject.com/2009/2010-wisconsin-ironman-training-day-one/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/2010-wisconsin-ironman-training-day-one/feed/ 12 It’s eight hours after the conclusion of the Wisconsin Ironman Triathlon. And on the streets of Madison all that remains is a litter of paper cups and discarded plastic water bottles. <<Cross fade sound of leaf blower>> A city maintenance man sweeps up the clutter with a leaf blower in front of the State Capital […] It’s eight hours after the conclusion of the Wisconsin Ironman Triathlon. And on the streets of Madison all that remains is a litter of paper cups and discarded plastic water bottles. <<Cross fade sound of leaf blower>> A city maintenance man sweeps up... A city maintenance man sweeps up the clutter with a leaf blower in front of the State Capital building as the 2009 Triathlon season for many comes to an end. But 50 yards away at the Monona Terrace the 2010 Triathlon season is just beginning.
 
Jose Aguilar was the very person to get in line for next years’ Ironman. When did his triathlon training begin?
Aguilar_001
About 11PM last night
While many of this season’s triathletes were still crossing the finish line Aguilar and several others were getting into position for a spot in next year’s race. The Ironman training begins long before race day
Aguilar_002
The way it works, they let the volunteers register first. And then when they’re done, the general people register. And then when this process is done, they open registration online.
By 8AM the line to register is wrapped around the lower level of the Monona Terrace in two directions. Volunteers who helped the day before get first dibs on the coveted positions. Aguilar, a massage therapist from Chicago, camped out over night to better his chances.

Aguilar_003
I’m a little worried now. They said there were 3,000 volunteers yesterday. It almost looks like they’re all here.
The Wisconsin race is one of the popular triathlons in the Ironman series. Athletes from across the United States and around the world come each year to swim 2.4 miles on Lake Monona, ride 112 miles through the Dane County countryside and run 26.2 miles a full marathon along the streets of Madison 140.6 miles in all.
Aguilar_004
I’ve done several other Ironmen before and I hear a lot of good stories about this course, particularly the bike segment, how technical it is, how challenging it is. And also the crowd on the run, they’re pretty intense.

The exciting event inspires professional and amateur athletes alike to commit a lot of their time and energy to getting ready. Nathan Chandler also from Chicago was second in line behind Aguilar. He says Ironman isn’t just a one-day race.
Chandler_001
Half the battle of Ironman… it’s a physical battle obviously, but it’s also a mental battle. So you know if you can do the training you can probably do the race. But the training is the race.
So for everyone standing in line their Ironman training starts now. Beginning a year in advance their race-day preparations will be the end result of decisions they make today. But Chandler says it’s important to keep in perspective the cumulative 140.6 miles combined swim, bike and run is a process you have to take one day at a time.
Chandler_002
You can’t look too far in advance. You know I’ve learned you have to keep short-term goals. And meet those short term goals. So you’ve got to forget about the 140.6 and worry about the weekly training goals.
Fortunately Chandler has a solid training partner in his sister Kristin Reingruber. She says sharing the goal of an Ironman finish will keep them both on track.
Reingruber_001
It helps to have that extra person. You can call somebody to go on a bike ride. You don’t have to go out a ride 100 miles by yourself. It helps to have that training partner. So I think if we can do stuff together a little bit hear and there it will help us both, both of us stay motivated.
David Craig a Madison insurance salesman said training with a partner helped to get him through his first season to complete a shorter race.
David Craig_001
When I finished my half Ironman. I decided this Ironman thing was possible.
Motivated now to do the full race in 2010 Craig put his time in this year as a volunteer to secure his spot for next September.
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Ken Burns on “The National Parks” - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/ken-burns-on-the-national-parks/ Thu, 20 Aug 2009 13:34:38 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=940 http://joytripproject.com/2009/ken-burns-on-the-national-parks/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/ken-burns-on-the-national-parks/feed/ 6 For more than 30 years documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has revealed many of the great mysteries of our uniquely American culture. Like an archaeologist he uncovers layers of time to show us through his films the artifacts of our not so distant past that shed light on the course events that has brought us to […] For more than 30 years documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has revealed many of the great mysteries of our uniquely American culture. Like an archaeologist he uncovers layers of time to show us through his films the artifacts of our not so distant past tha... For more than 30 years documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has revealed many of the great mysteries of our uniquely American culture. Like an archaeologist he uncovers layers of time to show us through his films the artifacts of our not so distant past that shed light on the course events that has brought us to where we are today.
In his latest film, The National Parks: America’s Best which airs on PBS stations nationwide on September 27th Burns demonstrates that the preservation and protection of our wild and scenic places embody the most cherished ideals our American heritage and the legacy of our future.
In this podcast edition of the Joy Trip Project Burns shares the story behind this inspiring new documentary film.
 

Music provided by the Conductive Alliance
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The Ballad of Mount Gitchigumi - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-ballad-of-mount-gitchigumi/ Wed, 12 Aug 2009 00:45:33 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=790 http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-ballad-of-mount-gitchigumi/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/the-ballad-of-mount-gitchigumi/feed/ 12 A lot of businesses are starting to explore their creative side. Expressions of art have begun to creep into the culture of many companies. In boardrooms and at seminars across America the stage is set for performing artists    like corporate poet Gordon Boudreau. “I write poems for whatever organization will invite me to do that,” […] A lot of businesses are starting to explore their creative side. Expressions of art have begun to creep into the culture of many companies. In boardrooms and at seminars across America the stage is set for performing artists    like corporate poet Gord... A lot of businesses are starting to explore their creative side. Expressions of art have begun to creep into the culture of many companies. In boardrooms and at seminars across America the stage is set for performing artists    like corporate poet Gordon Boudreau.
“I write poems for whatever organization will invite me to do that,” Boudreau said. “And I use their raw materials the specifics of their culture to craft these very intimate specific poems that entertain and hopefully instruct a bit.”
Boudreau is one of several former street performers who are showing senior executives how to have fun in the world of business. Lead by Carr Hagerman, the group known as OnTend Creative Partners is developing new strategies to raise the chuckle quotient among their clients’ employees and customers.


“We worked as consultants for Hampton Inn. It was the first time I had ever done such work,” Boudreau said.” And early on when we were in sort of the planning phases we were out at a bar with our contact a woman named Gina Valente and I had played a poet at this renaissance festival. Carr said to Gina, you should hear one of  his poems that he’s written. So I recited a poem and Gina’s eye lit up and she said “Oh my Gosh! Could you write an ode to Hampton and present it at these 19 cities? That we were going to tour with them. Do I did. And beyond any anticipation that I had, it was a huge hit people and they wanted copies of it. They wanted it filmed which they did. And then Hampton came to me ask me to write more poems.”
The tradition of commercial poetry goes back long before the day of Shakespeare. And as companies  try to define their corporate culture in different ways Boudreau says that poetry offers a unique alternate to business as usual.
“I think really at the very bottom of it all it’s a departure from powerpoint presentations,” he said. “And nothing against that, but I think people are a little tired of seeing the same graphs and charts.”
Gordy Boudreau and his fellow OnTend performers were to keynote speakers at the Outdoor Industry Association breakfast during Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2009 in Salt Lake City Utah. In an amazing poem called the Ballad of Mount Gitchigumi, Boudreau summed up the culture and business of outdoor recreation.
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Soil, It’s more than just dirt - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/soil-its-more-than-just-dirt/ Mon, 03 Aug 2009 12:46:52 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=585 http://joytripproject.com/2009/soil-its-more-than-just-dirt/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/soil-its-more-than-just-dirt/feed/ 0 Out here on the Midwestern prairies of Wisconsin were surrounded by acres of farmland. This time of year as we ride road bikes along the creamy smooth highways of Dane County. From one township to the next it’s vast fields of tall green corn plants as far as the eye can see. Averaging between 14 […] Out here on the Midwestern prairies of Wisconsin were surrounded by acres of farmland. This time of year as we ride road bikes along the creamy smooth highways of Dane County. From one township to the next it’s vast fields of tall green corn plants as ... Averaging between 14 and 17 mile per hour, we whiz past one corn field after the next. With ours heads tucked in the draft stream keeping pace with the summer training schedule the last thing anyone’s thinking about is the soil beneath our spinning tires.

It’s not just dirt you know. Earlier this summer during the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado I met a guy, a scientist who succeeded in changing how I’ll think about soil forever.

Glover_001

My name is Jerry Glover. I’m a soil scientist/agro ecologist at the Land Institute in Selina, KS.
Glover was one of the many presenters at day-long symposium on food and where it comes for. He taught me a thing or two about why soil is so important to sustaining human life.
Glover_002

All you have to do really to think about how important soil is, is pinch yourself. Because our flesh and bones are made up of elements: nitrogen, carbon Oxygen, hydrogen, Those comprise 97 percent of our body.
We’re also made up of other elements alike phosphorous, calcium, and magnesium
Glover_003

These elements have to come from somewhere. It’s not like we take a breath we know suddenly transform a breath into bones and flesh and skin. It’s from the food we eat. And of course then we need to ask, where does the plants that feed us or feeds the animals that we eat come from? They get it from soil.
Unfortunately, Glover says there’s problem. Modern farming techniques are eroding the planet’s soil and robbing it of the vital nutrients we desperately need to survive.

Glover_005

As soils erode wash away or degrade our abilities as humans to grow the food that we need to sustain our nice secure civilizations is degraded. And we see evidence throughout history. The Mediterranean civilizations that eroded and lost their soil, their civilizations collapsed. Likewise around the world, where people don’t have enough topsoil to produce abundant foods, they suffer political, they suffer social and economic crises, often resulting in wars, famines and you know a lot of serious problems that we don’t want to hand down to our children and our grand children.
Despite the lush green farm fields of our agricultural landscape Glover says the soil beneath is in serious trouble.
Click here to listen>> Soil
For more information on soil read the September 2008 issue of National Geographic Magazine:
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/09/soil/mann-text
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Tappening tells lies about bottled water - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/tappening-tells-lies-about-bottled-water/ Wed, 29 Jul 2009 15:00:56 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=532 http://joytripproject.com/2009/tappening-tells-lies-about-bottled-water/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/tappening-tells-lies-about-bottled-water/feed/ 4 This item came aross the desk this morning from the folks at Wend Magazine. The creative minds of Tappening, an intiative to encourage the consuption of tap water over bottled water, is spreading rummors. Adman Eric Yaverbaum is prompting consumers to make up falsehoods about the industry that delivers municiple tap water in plastic bottles. […] This item came aross the desk this morning from the folks at Wend Magazine. The creative minds of Tappening, an intiative to encourage the consuption of tap water over bottled water, is spreading rummors. Adman Eric Yaverbaum is prompting consumers to ... Wend Magazine. The creative minds of Tappening, an intiative to encourage the consuption of tap water over bottled water, is spreading rummors. Adman Eric Yaverbaum is prompting consumers to make up falsehoods about the industry that delivers municiple tap water in plastic bottles. Check it out at www.Startalie.com. You can also listen to an interview with Yaverbaum posted to the SNEWS Live Podcast in April 2008. Click here for the link: http://cache.snewsnet.com/snews/podcast/Tappening.mp3
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Simply Ming - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/simply-ming/ Mon, 06 Jul 2009 16:25:31 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=381 http://joytripproject.com/2009/simply-ming/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/simply-ming/feed/ 0 Ming Tsai is the chef and owner of Blue Ginger Restaurant in Wellesley Massachusetts. He’s also the national spokesman for the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network and works with the Obesity Center at Harvard University. You might have seen him on his PBS cooking show Simply Ming. Tsai understands better than most that it’s harder […] Ming Tsai is the chef and owner of Blue Ginger Restaurant in Wellesley Massachusetts. He’s also the national spokesman for the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network and works with the Obesity Center at Harvard University. Blue Ginger Restaurant in Wellesley Massachusetts. He’s also the national spokesman for the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network and works with the Obesity Center at Harvard University. You might have seen him on his PBS cooking show Simply Ming. Tsai understands better than most that it’s harder than ever for working families and individuals to prepare healthy meals.

Tsai was the master of ceremonies during a day-long symposium on food during the Mountain Film Festival earlier this summer in Telluride, Colorado. In this interview he discusses some of our most basic issues that people in the United States face when making food choices at home, in school and at their local restaurants.
Click here to listen>>Simply Ming
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Slow Food - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/slow-food/ Mon, 22 Jun 2009 01:09:48 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=301 http://joytripproject.com/2009/slow-food/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/slow-food/feed/ 0 If we slow down long enough to think about our food we just might come to realize there’s more to it than filling that nagging void in our bellies. We’re so pressed for time that we fail to think about the nutritional value of what we eat. Racing through the drive-thru window of fast food […] If we slow down long enough to think about our food we just might come to realize there’s more to it than filling that nagging void in our bellies. We’re so pressed for time that we fail to think about the nutritional value of what we eat.



If we slow down long enough to think about our food we just might come to realize there’s more to it than filling that nagging void in our bellies. We’re so pressed for time that we fail to think about the nutritional value of what we eat. Racing through the drive-thru window of fast food restaurants we pack faces with hamburgers and tacos loaded with fat, salt and empty carbohydrates. And worse than that, we really have no idea where this food came from, how it’s prepared or whether or not the people who made it are treated well and paid a living wage. And it’s not just the folks that flip those burgers and pack those tacos. There’s a complete food chain people who planted and picked the tomatoes, the lettuce and the cucumbers that become our pickles. What about them?

Josh Viertel is the president of Slow Food USA. It’s his job to help all of us slow down and make better food choices.

“As I see it, my job is to help Slow Food basically change the food system so that everyone can eat food that’s good for them, that’s good for land that’s good for the people who produce it and pick it,” he said.

Josh Viertel was one of several presenters at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride, Colorado. This year the conversation was all about food and how we eat. Viertel suggests that every meal best served slowly.
Click here to listen>>Slow Food
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“National Parks” still photographer Quang-Tuan Luong - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-still-photographer-quang-tuan-luong/ Mon, 15 Jun 2009 13:49:05 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=229 http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-still-photographer-quang-tuan-luong/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-still-photographer-quang-tuan-luong/feed/ 0 In most films by Ken Burns like the Brooklyn Bridge, Jazz, The Civil War or Baseball he uses historical archive photographs that show us snap shots of time long past. And though there are plenty of old photos in his latest film “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” Burns also uses modern images taken by […] In most films by Ken Burns like the Brooklyn Bridge, Jazz, The Civil War or Baseball he uses historical archive photographs that show us snap shots of time long past. And though there are plenty of old photos in his latest film “The National Parks: Ame...
Luong’s images feature prominently in Burns’ National Parks film series due to premiere on PBS station nation wide in late September. Having visited all 58 National Parks at least three times each Luong’s photographs help to tell their story and show us clearly what they look like today. I had the pleasure of meeting Luong in San Francisco during a symposium on diversity hosted by the National Park Service called Parks For All. We met again at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado a few later where I recorded this interview.
Click Here to Listen>>Quang-Tuan Luong

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“Pay It Forward” Summit Credit Union makes new philanthropists $10 at a time - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/pay-it-forward-summit-credit-union-makes-new-philanthropists-10-at-a-time/ Tue, 09 Jun 2009 12:03:48 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=114 http://joytripproject.com/2009/pay-it-forward-summit-credit-union-makes-new-philanthropists-10-at-a-time/#comments http://joytripproject.com/2009/pay-it-forward-summit-credit-union-makes-new-philanthropists-10-at-a-time/feed/ 2 This story aired June 9, 2009 on Wisconsin Public Radio James_001>> Several weeks ago David Overlin was given a $10 bill. He was one of few thousand people in Southern Wisconsin asked by Summit Credit Union to pay the money forward. In other words, Overlin was tasked with giving the cash away to someone who […] This story aired June 9, 2009 on Wisconsin Public Radio James_001>> Several weeks ago David Overlin was given a $10 bill. He was one of few thousand people in Southern Wisconsin asked by Summit Credit Union to pay the money forward. In other words, Wisconsin Public Radio
James_001>>
Several weeks ago David Overlin was given a $10 bill. He was one of few thousand people in Southern Wisconsin asked by Summit Credit Union to pay the money forward. In other words, Overlin was tasked with giving the cash away to someone who could use it more than he could.
Overlin_001>
This is wonderful. This is quite a surprise for my day.
James>> So you just got $10. What are you going to do with it?
Overlin>> I’m going to give it to the United Way. That’s what they gave it to me for.”
James_002>>
At select branches, anyone who came into the credit union at A particular day and time was given a crisp $10 bill to give away. But coming from a bank charity, that doesn’t sound like a lot of money.
Overlin_002>
It doesn’t, but hopefully they’ll give away a lot of $10s to people. Hopefully everybody gives it away so that would be nice.”
James_003>
Actually Summit Credit Union aims to give away much more than that. Called Pay It Forward, the program aspires to stimulate the spirit of philanthropic giving among ordinary people. Campaign coordinator Alexis Endicott says they plan to do this at each of Summit’s 20 locations.
Endicott_001>>
It’s $1000 per branch so it’s $20,000. It could affect 5 or 6 different markets that we’re in and have an impact on schools or charities or just promote goodwill around each of those communities.
James_004>>
Summit Credit Union’s offices include ones IN Madison, Beaver Dam, Baraboo, Lake Mills and Portage. And for some, these seemingly small contributions will go far beyond their local communities. Kari Myarland is among three residents in the town of Fitchburg who decided to support an overseas relief organization.
Myarland_001>>
We decided to pool our money and invest in Heifer International. It’s a philanthropic organization where you can actually buy animals and other things that you can pledge to other communities or countries. We’re buying a goat in Honduras so that we can provide a sustainable donation rather than something that’s consumable.”
James_006>>
Sharing in the goat donation Karen Gaustad says the money offered up by Summit Credit Union helped her continue and expand her current levels of charitable giving.
Karen Gaustad  _001>
Well when I find the right source for giving, I always try to do something like that. This was easy to do. It that made it relatively painless accept for the video.
James_007>
Oh yeah, there’s one other catch.
Everyone who received a $10 bill was asked to make a short video declaration of how they plan to pay it forward. Posted on the Summit Credit Union web site each video can be viewed online by friends, family and interested observers…then voted on.
AGAIN, coordinator Alexis Endicott:
Endicott_003
It’s a rating system similar to You-Tube. The top rated video will win $500 for themselves and $500 for a charity of their choice.”
James_008>
Jeanan Yasiri, Executive Director of the UW Center for Nonprofits, said the Pay it Forward program is a good community gesture to promote individual charitable giving in tough economic times.
Yasiri_002>>
The other thing that summit is doing that’s pretty important is they’re handing $10 to someone. But it’s then going to cause that individual to think about, “Oh, where can I give this?” And then, “Do I have the capacity to maybe match that with my own $10.” All of the sudden the gift is doubled. And the amount is really relative. It just engages that person in thinking about how they want to gift.
James_00>>
You can vote for your favorite Pay It Forward video...]]>
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“National Parks” Writer Dayton Duncan - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-writer-dayton-duncan/ Wed, 03 Jun 2009 12:29:33 +0000 http://joytripproject.wordpress.com/?p=37 http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-writer-dayton-duncan/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/national-parks-writer-dayton-duncan/feed/ 0 The new PBS film series “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” enjoyed its world premiere at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado.  Festival attendees had the opportunity to see all 6 episodes of this 12-hour Ken Burns documentary on the big screen. Not at all once but over three days. As you can imagine […] The new PBS film series “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” enjoyed its world premiere at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado.  Festival attendees had the opportunity to see all 6 episodes of this 12-hour Ken Burns documentary on th... The National Parks: America’s Best Idea,” enjoyed its world premiere at the Mountain Film Festival in Telluride Colorado.  Festival attendees had the opportunity to see all 6 episodes of this 12-hour Ken Burns documentary on the big screen. Not at all once but over three days. As you can imagine the film lived up to expectations. The most beautiful landscapes of North America were the perfect backdrop to portray the history of our wonderful National Parks.
Though Ken Burns’ reputation as a filmmaker is well known, little do most realize his documentary film franchise has a literary silent partner. Dayton Duncan is the writer and co-producer of The National Parks film series. And while Burns shows us images of these wild and scenic places it’s Duncan who tells us their stories.
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Three Cups of Tea - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/three-cups-of-tea/ Sat, 10 Jan 2009 00:47:46 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=820 http://joytripproject.com/2009/three-cups-of-tea/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/three-cups-of-tea/feed/ 0 Greg Mortenson was eager to make a difference. It didn’t matter that he was just one guy working alone. He got it into his head that he was going to build a school for the children of a remote village in the high mountains of Pakistan. But what Mortenson didn’t realize was that even with the […] Greg Mortenson was eager to make a difference. It didn’t matter that he was just one guy working alone. He got it into his head that he was going to build a school for the children of a remote village in the high mountains of Pakistan.
Greg Mortenson was eager to make a difference. It didn’t matter that he was just one guy working alone. He got it into his head that he was going to build a school for the children of a remote village in the high mountains of Pakistan.
But what Mortenson didn’t realize was that even with the best of intentions his well meaning plans to selflessly help others would meet only with frustration and failure. It wasn’t until he discovered the collective power of cooperation that he would meet and exceed his goals.
“It takes three cups of tea,” Mortenson said. “The first cup you’re a stranger. The second cup a friend. And the third cup you become family. And for family we’re prepared to do anything, even die.”

In adopting the customs of the people he hoped to serve, the simple gesture of sharing tea, Mortenson realized a philosophy of peace and understanding that may inspire a spirit of cooperation to ease even violent conflicts throughout our troubled world. Greg Mortenson is the subject and co-author of the best selling book Three Cups of Tea.







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Finding Beauty in a Broken World - The Joy Trip Project http://joytripproject.com/2009/finding-beauty-in-a-broken-world/ Thu, 01 Jan 2009 23:45:57 +0000 http://joytripproject.org/?p=809 http://joytripproject.com/2009/finding-beauty-in-a-broken-world/#respond http://joytripproject.com/2009/finding-beauty-in-a-broken-world/feed/ 0 Shattered. The broken pieces of a world torn apart by war and a planet devastated by greed and corruption lie scattered at our feet. In her new book, “Finding Beauty in a Broken World” poet and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams brings together the tattered fragments of our times into a literary mosaic of peace and […] Shattered. The broken pieces of a world torn apart by war and a planet devastated by greed and corruption lie scattered at our feet. In her new book, “Finding Beauty in a Broken World” poet and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams brings together the tatt...
Shattered. The broken pieces of a world torn apart by war and a planet devastated by greed and corruption lie scattered at our feet. In her new book, “Finding Beauty in a Broken World” poet and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams brings together the tattered fragments of our times into a literary mosaic of peace and reconciliation. From the charred ruins of the Twin Towers and the Pentagon on 9/11, to endangered prairie dogs of Utah, to the creation of a memorial to the 10s of thousands who died in the Rwandan genocide, Williams constructs an image of hope for a brighter future, a journey toward a time when human beings and the world they inhabit coexist with love and compassion.


This podcast is brought to you thanks to a generous grant from KEEN Footwear makers of shoes, bags and socks designed to take you wherever your Hybrid Life leads. visit www.keenfootwear.com

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