The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com Reporting on the business art and culture of the sustainable active lifestyle Fri, 01 Jun 2018 15:23:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 https://joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/cropped-JTPLogoWEB-32x32.jpg The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com 32 32 Reporting on the Business, Art & Culture of the Sustainable Active Lifestyle James Edward Mills clean James Edward Mills info@joytripproject.com info@joytripproject.com (James Edward Mills) ©The Joy Trip Project 2018 Reporting on the Business Art & Culture of the Sustainable Active Lifestyle The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/JTPSeason10C.jpg https://joytripproject.com TV-G Madison, WI 144835816 Girl Trek ~ Morgan Dixon Aspires to Get One Million Black Women Walking https://joytripproject.com/girl-trek-morgan-dixon-aspires-to-get-one-million-black-women-walking/ Mon, 16 Apr 2018 11:00:18 +0000 https://joytripproject.com/?p=2064801 https://joytripproject.com/girl-trek-morgan-dixon-aspires-to-get-one-million-black-women-walking/#comments https://joytripproject.com/girl-trek-morgan-dixon-aspires-to-get-one-million-black-women-walking/feed/ 1    Hey everybody! Yeah I know it’s been way too long since the last edition of the Joy Trip Project podcast. As it happens I’ve been crazy busy traveling, writing and yes conducting interviews. But most of the audio I’ve been recording over the last several months has been going toward a series of profiles for Outside Magazine. Check out the May 2018 cover story, which I wrote, called “The New Faces of Adventure”. This wonderful spread edited by Michael Roberts with photographs by Joao Canziani features 12...    Hey everybody! Yeah I know it’s been way too long since the last edition of the Joy Trip Project podcast. As it happens I’ve been crazy busy traveling, writing and yes conducting interviews. But most of the audio I’ve been recording over the last se...  
 Hey everybody! Yeah I know it’s been way too long since the last edition of the Joy Trip Project podcast. As it happens I’ve been crazy busy traveling, writing and yes conducting interviews. But most of the audio I’ve been recording over the last several months has been going toward a series of profiles for Outside Magazine. Check out the May 2018 cover story, which I wrote, called “The New Faces of Adventure”. This wonderful spread edited by Michael Roberts with photographs by Joao Canziani features 12 emerging athletes and activists who in their own words share the stories of their efforts to make outdoor adventure more diverse equitable and inclusive. The May issue of Outside Magazine is  on newsstands now so go out and get a copy. Or hang tight watch for the online edition available on April 20, 2018 at outsideonline.com
But getting back to the podcast, I was recently inspired by a remarkable post on Facebook from my friend Vanessa Garrison. She and another friend Morgan Dixon appeared at the 2018 TED Conference. As the creators of a women’s empowerment initiative called Girl Trek and they were introduced virtually to the TED stage my non other than Oprah Winfry 
Oprah: Hi all! I hope you’re having a great TED Conference. I wanted to chime in virtually here to introduce you to two women that I think are doing some of the most transformational work on our planet. It’s big. I mean it’s really big. And it’s wise because it’s based on the wisdom of nature, that cataclysmic shifts start with just a tiny seed. These two women understand that the world is changed when nations are changed and nations are changed when cities are changed. Cities get changed when communities are changed. And communities are changed when individuals are changed. And when we look at history we know that some of the most potent change makers are, let’s be real people, Black women. So let’s start with them. Get these movers and shakers, get them talking. Get them dreaming and plotting and oh wow. Oh wow. Wow imagine what’s going to come of that. I’d like to introduce you to the seed planners and the co-founders of Girl Trek Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison! 
So I’m watch this video and Vanessa and Morgan step  out onto the stage. Morgan gives a nod to Oprah and then there’s Vanessa.
Vanessa Garrison: Now many of you may know us. We Are the co-founders of Girl Trek the largest health organization for black women in America. Our mission is simple: ask black women, 80 percent of whom are over a healthy body weight, to walk outside of their front door every day to establish a life saving habit of walking. In doing so ignite a radical movement in which black women reverse the devastating impacts of chronic disease, reclaim the streets of their neighborhoods, create a new culture of help for their families and stand on the front lines for justice. Today all across America more than a hundred thousand black women are wearing this Girl Trek blue shirt as they move through their communities. A heroic force. 
JEM: Right out of the gate Venessa lays out the basic strategy that Girl Trek recommends to its leaders and follower how they can make positive changes their lives and the communities in which they live.
VG: One: to have a bold idea, bigger than anyone is comfortable with. Two: Root d in the cultural traditions of your community and lean heavily on what has come before. Three: Name it.]]>
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Alice's Garden – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/ Fri, 20 Oct 2017 13:00:37 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064487 https://joytripproject.com/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/#respond https://joytripproject.com/alices-garden-community-sustainable-agriculture-in-downtown-milwaukee/feed/ 0 It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world. Modern agriculture is such a big deal, because things like soil health and water quality directly impact the nutrition, physical health and wellbeing of people all over the world.  But farms no matter how big or small also have a profound effect on the... It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world.
It was the summer of 2017 and I was just coming off a major reporting project. I’d spent the better part of a year working on series of stories about the private land owners, farmers and ranchers and their relationship with the natural world. Modern agriculture is such a big deal, because things like soil health and water quality directly impact the nutrition, physical health and wellbeing of people all over the world.  But farms no matter how big or small also have a profound effect on the overall safety and security of nearby  rivers and lakes.

Across North America watersheds that span hundred, even thousand of miles connect our forests upstream to densely populated cities where urban people depend upon the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables, sustainably raised meat and dairy products and of course safe drinking water. So agriculture was pretty heavy in my thoughts when I reached out to my friend Amy Kober. She’s the director of communications at the nonprofit American Rivers and I was really just checking in to see what kind of initiatives they might be working on in relation to watersheds and farming.

“Well, it just so happens ,”she said “we’re about to release a new film we produced on the Milwaukee River.” Amy sent me a link to a film called Alice’s Garden. There I could stream it online in advance and I was pretty blown away in the first two minutes of watching it. Milwaukee is about an hour and half from my front door and I had never heard of Alice’s Garden. Located in the heart of downtown this green patch of land is surrounded the urban core. With systems in place to retain rainwater and restore the capacity of the soil to support growing things, Alice’s Garden helps people who live in the neighborhood to experience nature in meaningful ways through the cultivation of fresh vegetables. But what really struck me most was the environmental justice angle of this very cool short film.

“If we’re going to be honest, the river of Milwaukee and Lake Michigan are places that have been refashioned more for white people with means than for the community I serve on a daily basis,” said Venice Williams, an African-American woman who is the executive director of Alice’s Garden. “I personally love going downtown and I love the riverwalk, but when I look up, there are very few people who look like me. So I think the rivers in this city, if we’re going to be honest, have been some of those places of segregation and divide.”

It didn’t take long for me to realize that I wanted to learn more about this remarkable place in one of the most urbanized cities in North America. So I made the drive cross-state to have a conversation with Venice Williams at Fondy Farmers Market in heart of the African-American community in Downtown Milwaukee. There just a few blocks away where she and members of her community grow their own vegetables she told me all  about Alice’s Garden.

Alice’s Garden from American Rivers on Vimeo.



 

 

 

Music this week provided by Low Tree or Ziv Moran You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, 2064487
Ranger Betty Reid Soskin – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/ Wed, 12 Jul 2017 12:00:41 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064330 https://joytripproject.com/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/#respond https://joytripproject.com/ranger-betty-reid-soskin/feed/ 0   At 95 years young National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during one of the most turbulent periods in time. Drawing on her personal experience through the 1940s she offers a compelling look into the past that helps us to understand who we are today and chart a course toward a brighter tomorrow. As an African-American woman who endured and...   At 95 years young National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during ...
 

At 95 years young
National Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin is a national treasure. Stationed at the Rosie The Riveter/World War II Homefront National Historic Park in Richmond, California she interprets the cultural narrative of life in America during one of the most turbulent periods in time. Drawing on her personal experience through the 1940s she offers a compelling look into the past that helps us to understand who we are today and chart a course toward a brighter tomorrow. As an African-American woman who endured and survived the racially motivated oppression of previous generations, Ranger Soskin offers young people of color especially the hope and motivation to become leaders and role models themselves in the future.



Ranger Soskin addressed a gathering of more than 200 young people of color at an event called the PGM ONE Summit in Berkeley, California. PGM stands for People of the Global Majority, an emerging new generation of black and brown people around the world who are mobilizing to achieve lasting social change. Much like those of her generation who rallied to confront the   threat of foreign armies during World War II Soskin wants the young people of today to stand up against the rising challenges of the 21st century.

“I’ve live now for almost 96 years. And what I have learn in those 96 years is the fact that ever since 1776 my nation has experienced an upward spiral, ciclical periods of chaos,” Soskin said. “And it’s in those periods of chaos that democracy is redefined. We’re in another one of those now. Those periods provide opportunities to reset the buttons, allows us to redefine what demoncracy means. And to get on with the project of forming that more perfect union.”

After so many years of life experience in this country Ranger Soskin understands that the great experiment of democracy is an ongoing process. Like ascending a spiral staircase we wind our way round and round, getting higher and higher though we seem to find ourselves in the same place time and time again. And here we are back to once more test and redefine the integrity of American democracy. We’ve here before.

Right after her talk in Berkeley Ranger Soskin shared with me her thoughts on our history and the roles each us may play to protect the legacy of our future.
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Music in this episode by Oren Tsor and Muted 

]]> James Edward Mills clean 2064330 The Delicious Wind – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:00:12 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064286 https://joytripproject.com/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/#respond https://joytripproject.com/the-delicious-wind-an-interview-with-writer-rahawa-haile/feed/ 0 Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2,179 miles from Georgia to Maine under the power of her own two feet over several months in 2016. In her fascinating story, one passage in particular stood out. “Throughout my youth, my grandmother and I took walks in Miami, where I’d hear her say the words tuum nifas,” Haile wrote. “It meant a delicious wind, a... Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2,
Outside Magazine recently featured a wonderful essay by the writer Rahawa Haile. This young woman from Miami, Florida had successfully through-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Walking solo, she made the journey of 2,179 miles from Georgia to Maine under the power of her own two feet over several months in 2016. In her fascinating story, one passage in particular stood out.

“Throughout my youth, my grandmother and I took walks in Miami, where I’d hear her say the words tuum nifas,” Haile wrote. “It meant a delicious wind, a nourishing wind. These experiences shaped how I viewed movement throughout the natural world. How I view it still. The elements, I thought, could end my hunger.”



Transformational experiences in nature are perhaps the single most compelling reason that anyone would devote months of their lives and thousands of miles walking the great National Scenic trails of North America. Every year trails like the Appalachian, the Continental Divide or the Pacific Crest draw hikers from across the country and around the world to sample the delicious, nourishing winds of the world outside. Many spend these long hikes in quiet reflection of their lives, while others use this time to heal the emotional wounds of their past. In that regard Rahawa Haile was no different. But during the intensely divisive and politically polarizing climate of the 2016 Presidential election she felt the added burdens of race and gender identity in a natural environment populated predominantly by white men.

The disparities of participation among those who spend time in nature and those who don’t still fall dramatically along the same distinctions of race, gender and class that divide much of our country today. But on her long journey Haile was pleased to discover that she was welcomed and encouraged to become part of the Appalachian Trail community despite hiking while bisexual, female and black.

This interview with writer and Appalachian Trail through-hiker Rahawa Haile was recorded in a coffee shop in Oakland, California. Sorry about all the ambient noise, but this conversation was definitely worth sharing. Look for a feature story on Haile and the delicious winds of the outdoors in the next issue of the journal Appalachia.



Music this week by Jake Shimabukuro. Check out his latest album Travels now available on iTunes or at Jake Shimabukuro.com


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To Be Brave ~ An interview with Royal Robbins – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/to-be-brave/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 18:37:19 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064237 https://joytripproject.com/to-be-brave/#respond https://joytripproject.com/to-be-brave/feed/ 0   On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of Yosemite’s Half Dome and in 1961 he completed an ascent of the Salathé Wall on El Capitan. In a long career that included the founding of a global sports apparel brand that bears his name Royal Robbins was a leader in the...   On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of ...
 

On Tuesday March 14, 2017 climbing pioneer Royal Robbins died of natural causes at his home in Modesto California. He was 82 years old. A leader in the world of mountaineering he completed the first class VI climb in America on the Northwest Face of Yosemite’s Half Dome and in 1961 he completed an ascent of the Salathé Wall on El Capitan. In a long career that included the founding of a global sports apparel brand that bears his name Royal Robbins was a leader in the outdoor industry and a philanthropic supporter of many organizations that encouraged environmental conservation and getting youth outside.

In 2009 at the Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival in Alberta, Canada I had the pleasure of meeting Robbins for the first time. He very graciously agreed to an interview on his book To Be Brave, the first in a series of memoirs that recounted his remarkable life of adventure. In this flashback edition of the podcast I am proud to share for the first time this archived conversation with Royal Robbins.

Music in this edition of the Joy Trip Project by the Ahn Trio 
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Campfire Stories ~ An interview with authors Dave & Ilyssa Kyu – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/campfire-stories/ Mon, 23 Jan 2017 14:55:23 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064174 https://joytripproject.com/campfire-stories/#respond https://joytripproject.com/campfire-stories/feed/ 0 [dropcap]I[/dropcap]n 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments. I know I personally made stops at Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon and Yosemite. It was during this centennial summer that I had the chance to meet two truly amazing people. Dave and Ilyssa Kyu are graphic artists based in Philadelphia. Through the magic of social media I connected with them in a series of Facebook posts and a... [dropcap]I[/dropcap]n 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments. [dropcap]I[/dropcap]n 2016 the National Park Service celebrated its 100th anniversary. Throughout the year millions of people from around the world traveled across the United States to visit our historic parks and monuments. I know I personally made stops at Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon and Yosemite. It was during this centennial summer that I had the chance to meet two truly amazing people. Dave and Ilyssa Kyu are graphic artists based in Philadelphia. Through the magic of social media I connected with them in a series of Facebook posts and a remarkable project they had funded through Kickstarter. As they were traveling home after a long journey they just happen to make a stop near my home in Madison, Wisconsin. There we met for breakfast at an outdoor café to hear about more about their recent travels.

“We are just wrapping up a three and half-month trip across the U.S. travel to six national parks,” Ilyssa said. ” We went to Acadia, Smokey Mountains, Rocky Mountains, Zion, to Yosemite and to Yellowstone. We went to each of these national parks to interview all different types of people to help us with the research for our book Campfire Stories.

Anytime you mix the national parks with storytelling you’re definitely going to pique my interest. Dave and Ilyssa’s project sparked a wonderful discussion on the importance identity and a sense of place in the continuing efforts to protect and preserve our public lands for future generations.

“We only started going outdoors as adults,” Dave said. “And we where always curious to learn more about these outdoor places where we were starting to spend so much of our vacation time in. We were looking around for a book of campfire stories from these national parks and didn’t find it so we thought, why don’t we make it!”

Inspired by camping excursions near their home in Philadelphia these two artists ventured out to find others in their tribe of enthusiasts to share their tales of the wild. From the rocky beaches of Acadia National Park in Maine to the granite cliffs of Yosemite Valley in California they drove thousands of miles in search of stories that profoundly express our collective passion for the majestic beauty of the world outdoors. In the tradition of sharing tales of adventure  around a roaring fire while camped out under the stars or huddled under blankets in a rustic lodge Dave and Ilyssa have gathered together a series of exciting narratives in a new book they call Campfire Stories.

The new book Campfire Stories will be out soon. Dave and Ilyssa are taking a bit of break from writing as they embark on another great adventure. They recently welcomed the arrival of a baby daughter named Lula June. You can learn more about their project and even pre-order a copy online at http://campfirestoriesbook.com
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This Moment ~ A conversation with Dr. Carolyn Finney – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/0808-2/ Mon, 08 Aug 2016 14:00:45 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2064002 https://joytripproject.com/0808-2/#respond https://joytripproject.com/0808-2/feed/ 0 In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the natural spaces of the United States for future generations. As our National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary the group aims to make it possible for those in our society least likely to spend time in the outdoors to become passionate stewards of... In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the...
In March 2016 a group of environmental activists came together to share a vision. Gathered from across the country this eclectic mix of men and women came to Washington D.C. in order to  collaborate on the creation of a plan to protect and preserve the natural spaces of the United States for future generations. As our National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary the group aims to make it possible for those in our society least likely to spend time in the outdoors to become passionate stewards of our public land well into the 21st century and beyond. Called the Next 100 Coalition this dynamic assembly of leaders is telling the stories of African-American, Latino, Asian and Native American people of color who have long enjoyed a history and legacy of conservation.

As a member of the Next 100 Coalition, Dr. Carolyn Finney is helping to define a new vision of conservation that will carry us into the future. In the sincere belief that sustainable land management requires the cooperation and participation of all the American people Dr. Finney has crafted a compelling narrative that details the rich cultural heritage of our past while celebrating the great opportunities we enjoy today to build a brighter tomorrow. In this moment she wants us to realize that now is the time to set aside all that had divided us in the past in order to make a better world for the millions of children who will one day inherit the land we leave behind.

I had the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Finney recently in Washington D.C. and she shared with me her wonderful vision of the future in an essay called This Moment. Addressing the potential lives of children born eight years ago at the begining of the administration of President Barack Obama, Finney details a series of challenges and opportunities to make proactive change in the decades which still lie before us.
“What we can do in this moment is work to change the nature of the next moment. What

we can do in this moment is to remember, learn, fight, stand and expand who we are and

who we might become,” she said. “In 2008, 4,247,694 babies were born (in the U.S.). And no matter the color of their hands, they will be reaching for grass, dirt and dreams and we will need all their love and fight and possibility.”

Dr. Finney is the author of the book Black Faces White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. She is a professor geography at the University of Kentucky and you can follow her work online at CarloynFinney.com



This edition of the Joy Trip Project Podcast is part of the New Century Vision Project and is made possible with the support of our partner Choose Outdoors. Find out how you can get connected to our public lands through outdoor recreation at ChooseOutdoors.org. #inclusivevision4next100


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José In The Arctic – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/jose-in-the-arctic/ Fri, 22 Jul 2016 15:44:38 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063928 https://joytripproject.com/jose-in-the-arctic/#respond https://joytripproject.com/jose-in-the-arctic/feed/ 0 Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we live work and play. One such place is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In a region of Alaska so remote that it is only accessible by small charter airplane the Arctic Refuge is perhaps the most geographically isolated wilderness area in the continental United States. Very few people will ever... Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we li...
Sometimes, when we’re talking about environmental conservation it’s difficult to know or even imagine exactly what really mean. That’s especially true when we’re asked care, I mean really care about remote areas thousands of miles away from where we live work and play. One such place is the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In a region of Alaska so remote that it is only accessible by small charter airplane the Arctic Refuge is perhaps the most geographically isolated wilderness area in the continental United States. Very few people will ever visit there, but as the home many different plant and animal species including caribou and grizzly bears this remarkable ecosystem on the shores of the Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Ocean is at the forefront of the modern conservation movement. And as a bellwether of the global impacts of climate change the protection of the Arctic Refuge is a major priority for conservation groups like the Sierra Club and many other environmentally focused community outreach organizations.

José Gonzalez is the founder of Latino Outdoors. His group aims to help members of the Latino community to become engaged in efforts to protect the natural environment. Along with a leader from Outdoor Afro, a group dedicated to helping African American families forge a bond with the natural world,  José and I had the rare opportunity to travel through the Arctic Refuge. Over the span of seven days we paddled more than 50 miles  along the course of the HulaHula river to experience for ourselves the unique beauty of this vast yet fragile natural habitat. In the hopes raising awareness for the importance of this and other distant wilderness areas this trip was organized to help make a connection with emerging communities of color who will one day be called upon to save them.
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The purpose of this trip was to help define a new vision of environmental protection, one that includes the participation of all the American people. That means people of color. As the National Park Service celebrates it’s 100th anniversary in 2016 we look forward to a new century of conservation that is more diverse and inclusive. You can get involved. Just follow the hashtag inclusivevision4next100 on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.



This edition of the Joy Trip Project Podcast is part of the New Century Vision Project and was made possible with the support of our partner Choose Outdoors. Find out how you can get connected to our public lands through outdoor recreation at ChooseOutdoors.org. #inclusivevision4next100



And special thanks to the Sierra Club for making this Joy Trip possible. Learn more about the 2063928
Forget Me Not ~ An interview with Jennifer Lowe-Anker – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/ Wed, 04 May 2016 17:42:41 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063773 https://joytripproject.com/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/#respond https://joytripproject.com/forget-me-not-an-interview-with-jennifer-lowe-anker/feed/ 0 If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the base of Mt Shishapangma. After 17 years the legacy of Alex Lowe is continues through the lives his surviving climbing parnter Conrad Anker, his wife Jennifer and his sons Max, Sam and Issac. In his name the Alex Lowe Foundation works support and improve the lives of indigenous... If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the ba...
If you’ve been following the news recently you probably heard that there was a startling discovery in the mountains of Tibet. The bodies of climber Alex Lowe and filmmaker David Bridges were discovered near the sight of a tragic 1999 avalanch at the base of
Mt Shishapangma. After 17 years the legacy of Alex Lowe is continues through the lives his surviving climbing parnter Conrad Anker, his wife Jennifer and his sons Max, Sam and Issac. In his name the Alex Lowe Foundation works support and improve the lives of indigenous people throughout the Himalayan region as well as raise awareness for the importance of avalanche safety and prevention.

In memory of Alex Lowe the Joy Trip Project is reposting an interview with Jennifer Lowe-Anker recorded in 2009. Her memoir  Forget Me Not shares the intimate details of her life after having tragically lost her husband, a climber, only to fall in love all over again with another one.

Have you have ever thought about why you love the things you love most? And not just things, what about people? How do we come to discover those with whom we fall in love? Through the course of our lives I believe we drawn without even realizing it to things, places and people that are important to us, that make us happy. We bring them into our lives and with them comes great joy. But sometimes, actually more often than not, the thing that you love most is what keeps you apart.

Jenny:

I think from the beginning I knew Alex was one of those guys that was kind of like a wild bird that you might entice to hold in your hand but you could never really hold on to him. And that was part of his appeal to me.

JTP:

Jennifer Lowe-Anker was in love with professional climber Alex Lowe. Each with a passion for the outdoors and the wild scenic places of the world, they built a life together of adventure and travel. But with separate careers, Jenny as fine artist, there were many times when the two were apart for long stretches of time while Alex explored

Jenny:

Interestingly enough that’s what I thought of book from the very beginning. I thought this was not going to be the average climbing story. And I’m not going to be doing a biography but what I really wanted was to show people the person that they loved from the most intimate perspective that I could give away of him because there was such an outpouring of grief and love for Alex at his death.

Jenny:

Very soon after we got married I decided to leave him and go off in pursuit of a better job because I didn’t like the fact that I wasn’t making good money and I felt like I was spinning my wheels. It was just a situation we were in and I kind of learned from him that time was precious and I wanting to make good use of my time and thinking when we’re together we could do something fun once we made our money and earned it. So I took off and chose to spend a couple of months apart from him working so that we could have a different dream.

JTP:

Do you have any idea what it was like for him without you?

Jenny:

I certainly do through his letters. He missed me. We missed each other. And we wrote each other a lot. And some of those letters you get to read. He wrote very avidly. I literally have over a thousand letter from Alex through the time we were together.

Jenny:

We were together through our letters a lot. He sat down and wrote me nearly every night when were apart. And sometime it was in a journal form and he would spend me like 5 sheets you know over a period of a week or two weeks and little bits of writing that he did everyday to tell me little pieces of what he lived that day and share th...]]> James Edward Mills clean 13:55 2063773 Life Or Limb ~ Recovering From The Traumatic Injuries of War – The Joy Trip Project https://joytripproject.com/0415-2/ Fri, 15 Apr 2016 18:14:28 +0000 http://joytripproject.com/?p=2063733 https://joytripproject.com/0415-2/#respond https://joytripproject.com/0415-2/feed/ 0 One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickstarter campaigns as well as provide financial support to folks in need through Indie-Go-Go. And it was just such a request that reminded me of a story I did in 2008 when I met my good friend Chad Jukes. He’s currently... One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickst...
One of the things I love most about this podcast is the ability to tell amazing stories. And in the process I also help to raise awareness for some very important causes. With your support the Joy Trip Project has been able to back more than few Kickstarter campaigns as well as provide financial support to folks in need through Indie-Go-Go. And it was just such a request that reminded me of a story I did in 2008 when I met my good friend Chad Jukes. He’s currently looking for support to climb the highest mountainin the world Mount Everest.

“I’m a staff sergeant in the army,” Jukes had told me. “Back in 2006 I was running convoy security operations over in Iraq and my truck hit an anti-tank mine and ended up shattering my heel bone and breaking my femur.”

Recorded at during the time of the Irag War this interview aimed to explore how soldiers like Jukes were dealing with the aftermath of devasting injuries received in combat.

“After a few months I ended up contracting an infection a fairly serious infection in my heel,” Jukes said. “And when they went in to repair that they discovered that the infection had done a lot of damage to the bone. At that point they gave me a few options. And one of them was amputation.”

At the time Jukes was only 22-years-old and he was faced with one of hardest decisions anyone would ever have to make. Should he abandon the hope of recovering his damaged foot or allow the doctors to remove his leg from below the knee?

At that point I went online and started doing some research and ended up finding a web site called the adaptive climbers organization.com,” Jukes said. “And I went in there and posted on the forums with my situation. Within the day I received responses from Malcolm Daly, Pete Davis, Craig DeMartino and a number of others with advice for me, and just telling me what I could expect if I chose the amputee route.”

The guys who responded to Jukes’ post were all climbers, including my old boss and long-time friend Malcolm Daly. Each of them had opted for amputation rather than preserve a damaged foot or leg. In the hopes of continuing their lives in the most active ways possible these injured athletes provide inspiring role models for wounded soldiers to recover from the tragic circumstance of war to ascend to unimaginable heights. And in this flashback edition of the podcast we’re revisiting the process Jukes endured to put him on track toward an Everest summit.

Our theme music is by Jake Shimabukuro. The Joy Trip Project is made possible thanks to fans like you on Patreon. For as little as a dollar month you can support this podcast and many adventure media initiatives covered here. For details visit patreon.com/joytripproject.



Thanks for listening, but as always I want to hear from you. So please write to me with your questions comments and criticisms to info@joytriproproject.com
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