Jerry’s 704-ft world record highline

Jerry's record highline

Perhaps one of the most critical questions that most any adventurer will ask themselves is, why? Once you get past the ego and obsession to achieve glory for having accomplished some amazing feat of athletic skill or daring everyone who risks the fortunes of life at some point will have to reconcile within their hearts and minds the purpose for which they dedicated even the least significant moments of their time on Earth and put everything on the line. In this short from Highliners Film http://www.highlinersfilm.com we get a brief illustration of one man’s journey not seek excitement or a rush of adrenaline but instead to discover the quiet silence of his own anxious mind.

In walking the longest highline ever recorded Jerry Miszewski learns that his thoughts and actions are directly reflected in the world around him. When reduced to a linear path 704 feet long and only 2 inches wide he comes to realize that it’s not until he removes the conflict and turmoil of his thoughts and his body that the journey before him becomes smooth and easy to travel. His purpose in achieving this accomplishment was to learn a valuable lesson how best to walk through life.

“What you do affects where you are and what is about you,” Jerry says. “What you’re doing is affecting where you’re at. So be aware of yourself. Highlining teaches you that, it teaches you how to be aware.”

 

Jerry’s 704 ft world record highline from grantimus prime on Vimeo.

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Author:James

I'm a freelance journalist that specializes in telling stories about outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving and practices of sustainable living.

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