Surviving Chicago Snow

Reports are coming in from survivors of the recent snowstorm in Chicago. Joy Trip Project friend, fan and now correspondent Geoff Burton sent this writer’s notebook.

It’s been twenty hours since the Storm of the Millennium targeted and devastated the once mighty city of Chicago.

Rations are few as all grocery stores were ravaged yesterday afternoon. My own supplies are nearly depleted – I only have two bags of jelly beans and three 1-pound bags of Boston Baked Beans left. Fortunately essential supply outlets managed somehow to stay open: Dunkin Donuts, McDonalds and Starbucks. It is rumored that Chipotle Grill will open soon.

It is much worse here than you can possibly imagine. In the course of the frozen holocaust, mother nature’s wrath dumped 8.5 inches of measurable snow on the metropolis; with drifts towering as high as 18 inches! Ungodly! How can we survive. This will surely be a test of intestinal fortitude.

I’ve only seen one or two people on the streets, I can only assume the rest have perished. There is a front loader filling a dumpster – I can only guess it is filling it with snow-covered corpses.

Looking out the window of this Duncan Donuts I can see two of many encroaching wild coyotes fighting over a leg bone.

Oh, check that, it’s a Labrador and Golden playing with a doggy toy!

Still, with only a few people left, I can only assume I must set out and begin to repopulate the city – I’ll need to find the right mates for the arduous task.

Okay, I’ve finished my Starbucks Caramel Macchiato (I don’t like Dunkin Donuts coffee – love the donuts!) – it’s time for me to go forth in this frozen tundra and survive. I must survive!

Geoff Burton is a freelance writer and film critic based in Chicago. Find him online at http://www.cinematrek.4t.com/

Share : Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on GooglePlusShare on LinkedinShare on Pinterest

Comments

Share your questions comments and criticisms

Powered by Facebook Comments

Author:James

I'm a freelance journalist that specializes in telling stories about outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving and practices of sustainable living.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on GooglePlusShare on LinkedinShare on Pinterest