Barbecued Pork Buns

Pork Buns_001

The food segment on NPR’s All Things Considered this evening got me thinking about one of my all-time favorite dishes. These YUMMY barbecued pork buns are a lot easier to make than you might imagine. This recipe comes from the Essential Kitchen Series: Dim Sum

Pork Buns_002Photographs by James Edward Mills

For Dough:
1 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1/4 cup superfine sugar
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup self-rising flour
3 teaspoons butter, melted
For Filling:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 teaspoons peeled and grated fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
3 teaspoons cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water
8 oz Chinese barbecue pork, finely chopped
6 scallions, finely chopped
DIRECTIONS

FOR DOUGH: In a small bowl combine yeast with 2 tablespoons warm water, 1 teaspoon sugar and 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour. Mix until well combined. Cover with a kitchen towel and let stand in a warm place until frothy, about 15 minutes.
Sift remaining all-purpose and self-rising flour into a large bowl. Add remaining sugar, yeast mixture, remaining warm water, and melted butter. Using a wooden spoon, mix to form a soft dough. Turn out onto a floured work surface and knead until smooth and elastic, 3-5 minutes. Place dough in a large oiled bowl, cover and let stand in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
FOR FILLING: Heat oil in a wok or frying pan over medium heat and fry ginger and garlic until aromatic, about 1 minute. Add hoisin sauce, oyster sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add the cornstarch and water mixture, bring to a boil and stir until sauce thickens, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in pork and scallions. Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely.
Punch down dough. Turn out onto a floured work surface and knead until smooth, about 5 minutes. Divide dough into 16 pieces and roll or press out each piece to form a 21/4-inch (6-cm) circle. Cover dough with a damp kitchen towel. Working with one round of dough at a time, spoon 2 teaspoons of filling into the center. Gather edges together, twist to seal and cover with a kitchen towel. Repeat with remaining dough.
Cut out 16 squares of parchment (baking paper) and place buns, sealed side down, on paper. Half fill a medium wok with water (steamer should not touch water) and bring to a boil. Working in batches, arrange buns in steamer, cover and place steamer over boiling water. Steam for 15 minutes, adding more boiling water to wok when necessary. Lift steamer off wok and carefully remove buns. Using scissors, snip the top of each bun twice, to resemble a star. Serve warm with soy sauce and hoisin sauce.
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Author:James

I'm a freelance journalist that specializes in telling stories about outdoor recreation, environmental conservation, acts of charitable giving and practices of sustainable living.

6 Responses to “Barbecued Pork Buns”

  1. November 3, 2009 at 6:53 pm #

    I'm going to try these!

  2. November 3, 2009 at 6:53 pm #

    I'm going to try these!

  3. Jerry Bank
    November 4, 2009 at 2:00 am #

    I am puzzled. I always thought of steamed buns as being made from a yeast dough, which this isn't. Is my memory off, or have the recipes changed since the sixties.

    • November 4, 2009 at 3:07 am #

      You're right Jerry. Yeast is the first ingredient in the dough…

  4. Jerry Bank
    November 4, 2009 at 2:00 am #

    I am puzzled. I always thought of steamed buns as being made from a yeast dough, which this isn't. Is my memory off, or have the recipes changed since the sixties.

    • November 4, 2009 at 3:07 am #

      You're right Jerry. Yeast is the first ingredient in the dough…

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